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  1. #1
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    Cutting weight on wife's bike (5' 105lbs)

    The more my wife rides, the more I ride. So I am trying to make it as enjoyable as possible. My strategy so far has to always give her bike better stuff than I'm riding. I just bought a really nice, two actually, bikes so it is time to work on her's.
    Since she is only 105 and far from aggressive, I figure that there are a lot more options for her to really lighten up without crazy money. Looking for some advice on what parts to put at the top of the list to swap out and what is out there that fits the criteria for this rider. Think I added a pic. First post so prolly messed it up.
    -d

    It is an xs Trek Fuel 90, early 2000's.
    Fork SID sl,
    XT rear deraileur
    LX front deraileur
    XTR shifter/brake (cable)
    BB7 brakes
    FSA carbon seatpost
    Bontrager Cranks
    XTR pedals
    DT Swiss 370 hubs
    DT Swiss E540 rims
    Kenda Small Block 8 tires (tubed)
    Bontrager Stem and Bar

    Cutting weight on wife's bike (5' 105lbs)-photo-6-.jpg

    Thanks for your thoughts.

  2. #2
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    Well crap, thought I put this in the weight weenies forum. Freakin noob.

  3. #3
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    Are you sure she wants new parts, or will even notice or care? I did the same thing to my ex's bike, and she wouldnt notice if the bike was on fire, much less care that I put a better crank/wheels/bars/shifters etc on it. A lot of other guys doing the same (upgrades without them really asking) report the same... buut,

    She doesnt need 540g rims for sure. Shes light enough she could run basically anything. Pacentis are on sale for 58 bucks right now. 320g of rim weight gone is pretty big. Bike will feel snappier.

    I highly dislike BB7's so Id personally change those but thats subjective. Everything else is good stuff.
    Last edited by One Pivot; 03-14-2013 at 05:54 PM.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the advice Pivot! The strategy does work with my wife though.
    I didn't realize that # on the rim was the weight. That is a big difference on those rims you mentioned. Not sure rebuilding her wheels is an option for me. Any wheelsets I should keep an eye out for?
    Perhaps this was the right sub forum after all.
    -d

  5. #5
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    I was going to suggest lighter rims and hubs, as well.

    Don't forget pedals, since they represent rotational weight, too. XTR's (310+ grams) are good but still heavy. If she is willing to learn a new pedal system, Eggbeaters or Bebops will save 150+ grams of push/pull weight every pedal cycle.

    Bebop chromoly w/aftermarket ti spindles: ~144 grams
    Eggbeater3 w/aftermarket ti spindles: ~220 grams

    In fact, I am thinking about the same upgrade, myself.

    Pj
    Phoenix, AZ
    Last edited by pdinphx; 03-17-2013 at 08:53 AM. Reason: added weights ...

  6. #6
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    I was going to say wheels as well.

    Tires, what size are those SB8's? If she's that light and you guys don't (or she doesn't) ride too knarly stuff, you can probably loose a good amount of weight in the tires.

    Also, those BB7's are heavy compared to most hydraulics. Most woman (especially smaller ones) have smaller, weaker hands. This could also be an advantage as she'll be able to easier pull the brake levers with less fatigue.

    Does she ride with gloves? She can probably get by with lighter (much lighter) grips, especially those foam or cork or even road bike tape. Again, with the lighter grips, they're often smaller in diameter, might be good for her.

    Can her seat post be cut down?

    I would advise against going tubeless just in case she's riding with others (not you) and she gets a flat, tubes are a lot easier to deal with.

    One final, do you guys do a lot of road riding with the bike? Often, woman don't like a lot of speed, if you do not need the big ring, loose it and go 2x. Additional benefit will be added ground clearance.

    Good luck with that, hope you're able to loose some of the weight, post up the improvements.

  7. #7
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    I agree that wheels and tires are the best place to start. A Shimano MT65 wheelset can be bought on e-bay for less than $250 shipped to your door. While not superlight at 1800 grams, they are 3/4 of a pound lighter than what you have (2135 grams) and UST compatible. Not sure if the SB8's you have are wire bead or not so can't comment on weight loss there. The Michelin Wild Grippr 2 Advanced and Wild Racer tires are both light and good performing tires that can be had for a reasonable price (I recommend the 2.25). Combined with the Shimano rims they can be run tubeless (or you can run tubes if you are worried about dealing with tubeless). Pick the tires based on your riding conditions.

    The next place I would go would be the brakes. You can get a good set of hydro brakes for less than $200 for the pair and they will drop 1/2-1 pound off the bike. I would also check what bottom bracket the cranks have, sometimes the factory bottom brackets are very heavy and can be upgraded inexpensively. Also check the cassette, it is a place where manufactures will cheap out and can often be a place to loose 100+ grams easily.

    Finally, you should check the weight for the stem and bars, depending on the ones you have, you may find another place you can loose weight easily.

    For $450-600 you should be able to easily drop 1.5-3 pounds off the bike while improving the riding experience.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  8. #8
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    Thank you all for the advice. The SB8s are folding bead. The seatpost could lose a couple inches but I have no experience cutting CF. I have a lathe, a band saw, and a mill so probably have the right tool somewhere.

    I've got a set of Mavic Crossrides on my Yeti, unless someone here has the weight info difference between the DTs and the Crossride Discs (or pro/con advice there), I'll weigh them this evening to see if I can make that switch until I figure out what wheelset to get her. So I guess a sub question to this post would be: What do you guys/gals think of those DT Swiss wheels vs. Crossrides on a 575 for a 180lb rider who likes to take the fun lines? Hijacking my own thread... but at least an appropriate question for this forum.

    Back to the Trek. If I replace the brakes, I would need to get new shifters since the XTR brakes are brake/shift combos. Not thinking that is going to be the most cost effective in this case.

    I'll have to look at the cassette, can't remember if I put the sram with an aluminum spider on there or an all steel shimano. Too many bikes.

    Will dig into the bb later to see what is hiding in there.

    She really likes the pedals and has not had any "incidents" with them so that would need to be a conversation with her.

    I should probably do a before and after weight of the whole bike too.
    -d

  9. #9
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    Re: Cutting weight on wife's bike (5' 105lbs)

    My suggestion isn't necessarily a weight saver but (in my opinion) definitely a performance enhancer. Swap out the tires for something more all mountain-ish. I think the increase in fun that comes from a confidence-inspiring tire will have a better payback than shedding 1/4 lb of weight. Fast-rolling race tires have a place, but in my opinion that place is not on the bike of someone who isn't racing.

    Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk 2

  10. #10
    Braille Riding Instructor
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    Agree with the others: easiest place to shave ounces off a bike are the wheels and tires. It's not necessarily the best place, however, depending on what you ride and how you ride.

    Assuming they are a recent model, those Crossride Discs will weigh about 1900 grams, excluding skewers. I believe the 2013 version is essentially UST ready and you wouldn't need to use rim tape to run tubeless. Previous models will require tape.

    What does wifey's bike currently weigh? Given the parts you listed, it seems like it's already fairly light, those burly rims notwithstanding.

  11. #11
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    Bike weight is 27.00 lbs as shown in picture.
    The BB is a square taper, didn't pull it to check the model. Sure it is not top end or light.
    The cassette is all steel, no aluminum spider.
    Should be able to drop 1/2 a pound by switching the dt's to crossrides with no $. I'll have to look through my parts to see where that other cassette went. Going to drill into this sub forum to figure out what wheels and tires for later.

  12. #12
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    Update:

    Wheels are now Stan's, 3.30 hubs, Crest rims, and revolution spokes.
    Added some weight with more aggresive tires, Ardent 2.2 front and Specialized something rear. The SB8's were both only slightly over 500g, the Ardent was 710 (I think) and the Spec was 610. Dropped 1.49 pounds with just the new wheels and tires (tubeless of course).

    Wanted some more so changed out the UN52 hub to a UN73 ($12 at Jenson), Carbon bar, new stem, foam Ritchy grips. Dropped another 141 grams.

    Haven't weighed the bike as a whole, just the parts I took off and put on. Should be down to 25.2 now. The cassette was only 310g so not sure there is much gain there. The Bontrager Comp crank weighed 739g with rings and bolts, the new bb was 262g (old bb was 320 something). Will need to keep my eye out for some short cranks on eBay and CL to break into the 25 mark. The rear triangle on her xs frame is VERY close to the bb so I am not sure an external bb would work.

  13. #13
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    I was reading as my wife I just got her back into it a bit since January, got her a FS marin bike and its on the heavier side about 32lbs, but so is she right now (LOL, good thing she doesn't read this forum!!). She was like, "YOUR bike is so much lighter.." when loading. I told her to keep up riding and we can see about upgrades.

    Agree with some of the posters, some women are like "huh? you changed something on my bike?" so you would be wasting money and time if that is her. My wife is like that with a lot of stuff, but does notice bike stuff like "wow those brakes are great" or "its shifting a lot better" and "my riding position is comfortable now". My idea was to get her into my hobby...

  14. #14
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    get some I-9's. They'll lighten the bike substantially and she can pick whatever her heart desires. It's one upgrade that she will notice and actually appreciate! deore hydro disc brakes would be another inexpensive but largely beneficial upgrade over those bb7's.
    Here's a pack of matches, go play in the street

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