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  1. #1
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    Custom Race Wheels

    I'm thinking of building a set of XC race wheels for the 09 season. Heres what I have in mind.
    Rim-Mavic 717XC Discs
    Front/Rear Hubs-Hope Pro II or Shimano XTR or XT's (to save money) not decided here yet
    Spokes-DT Swiss Revolution
    What does everyone think?

    I'm on the fence about the hubs, as I am on a budget. Any other suggestions? Does going tubeless save a lot of weight? Thanks.
    -J

  2. #2
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
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    If you're on a budget then XT are your hub. They're a reasonable hub and the price is ok. Just type '717' into the seach function of our forum sponsor and you'll come up with all this. Third set down is a 717/XT set but with Comp spokes. Revs are a bit lost on a wheelset like this but maybe they spec Revs on one of the other sets if you look around. I think their 819 rims are tubeless. Put 819 in the search.
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

  3. #3
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    Wow. Thanks for that website. It's not worth building a wheel set like I had in mind. Thanks again. Do you know anything about the XCR Pure hubs? I have never heard of them before? -J

  4. #4
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    "Does going tubeless save a lot of weight?"

    Usually not. It depends on how you go tubeless. Going full UST tubeless, i.e. UST rims and tires, you end up breaking about even weight wise with a standard tubed set up. This is because most UST rims are a bit heavier than a comparable tubed rim, and UST tires run heavier by an average of about 80 to 100g than their tubed counter parts. That pretty much negates the weight savings of elimnating the tube and rim strip.

    You can go with a conversion like Stans on a regular rim and run regular non-UST tires and save a fairl respectable amount of weight. But you give up the durability of the UST trie when you run a regular tire tubeless. Light weight racing tires usually have very thin side walls that are more prone to tears and abrassion than other tires. This becomes even more of a factor if you attempt to run them tubeless. Without the tube supporting the sidewall they become even more vulnerable.

    The best compromise is running a regular tire on a UST rim. You are still giving up a certain amount of durability as the tires are still more lightly constructed than a true UST tire. You can also run into bead compatability issues. Some regular tires just don't like to be run tubeless due to bead construction. "Tubles Ready" tires work well in this instance. They have a UST compatable bead but use a "regular" carcass for the tire which is lighter than a UST tire. But they do have to be run with sealant.

    The bottom line is, going tubeless is not so much about saving weight as it is gaining durability and reliability. Running a full on UST set up (wheels and tires) with a good sealant installed, dramatically reduces the chances of a puncture flat, and virtually elimates pinch flats. Which is a big deal when you consider that a good 80 to 90% of the flats that you see on the race course are pinch flats. A side benefit (not the primary though) is the ability to run lower pressures for a given tire (within reason of course) and gain traction performance. Going tubeless and running compatable and reasonably durable tires will likely only net you around a 50g weight reduction per wheel, if that. But it will gain you quite a bit of flat resistance. Like I said, you'd most likely break even in the weight department when you compare the overall weight of the tubed and UST systems, i.e. weight of tires, wheels and tubes vs. tires, wheels and sealant. But from a perfomance and durability aspect is well may be worth it even if you gain a few grams.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  5. #5
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by elf28p
    Wow. Thanks for that website. It's not worth building a wheel set like I had in mind. Thanks again. Do you know anything about the XCR Pure hubs? I have never heard of them before? -J
    A few people around here have them and say they look great but that tells us nothing of their reliability and repairability of course. Only time will tell us that. They're too new to the market to have a track record.

    You've never heard of them because they are the house brand hubs of the BWW company and made offshore (Taiwan I assume) for BWW. That's not a negative as much of our stuff is made the same way - take Ritchey, FSA, Cane Creek, Neuvation and many other bike parts companies for instance.

    I've got two BWW wheelsets on order - a mtb set for myself and a light road set for a (winning) masters lady racer I mechanic for.

    The BWW Pure hubs will have sealed bearings that you could source from almost any automotive or machining parts house in town. The freewheel (ratcheting pawl) system will be home servicable I imagine - and quite easily too. Parts should be available from BWW as long as they're in business - and we can say that about every company we buy from.
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

  6. #6
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    I got a set of American Classics off of Ebay for $400. Brand new 2008 American Classic rims/hubs, Sapim C-XRay spokes, Ceramic Bearings, and Titanium Q-releases. 1405g!
    Last edited by Flat Ark; 12-11-2008 at 12:29 PM.

  7. #7
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    I run a set of 819s with CK hubs and the Revolution Spokes. They are not really race wheels, as I don't race. I'm a fairly big guy, 175lb, and I ride pretty rock stuff. The spokes may be a bit light and flexy. My LBS has done some research and most folks would recommend that you don't put those spoke onto a mountain wheel. With that in mind, I love the wheels and have never had any issues with the spokes.

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