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  1. #1
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    Chris King Alloy Drive Shell

    I'm looking for opinions on the Chris King allow drive shell.

    I live in Vancouver, BC (Canada) and plan on riding everything from the North Shore freeride trails to some x-country. Weight is not a concern to me. I do _not_ go big when riding the North Shore. I'm a chicken! ;-) Even still, just riding the North Shore can be tough on parts.

    I want to know if the alloy drive shells will hold up, or whether the stainless steel ones are needed? I know the alloy shells can be scored by the cassette. Does that make removing the cassette troublesome?

    Has anyone ever had problems with their alloy ones? Would the problem have been fixed by having a stainless steel drive shell?

    Anyone have their alloy drive shell fail all together? If so, how did it fail?

    For those who had problems or failures, what kind of riding do you do?

    Opinions and comments welcome.

    Many thanks,
    Dave

  2. #2
    Code Burr
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave_l
    I want to know if the alloy drive shells will hold up, or whether the stainless steel ones are needed? I know the alloy shells can be scored by the cassette. Does that make removing the cassette troublesome?

    Has anyone ever had problems with their alloy ones? Would the problem have been fixed by having a stainless steel drive shell?

    Anyone have their alloy drive shell fail all together? If so, how did it fail?

    For those who had problems or failures, what kind of riding do you do?

    Opinions and comments welcome.

    Many thanks,
    Dave
    Ideally, you dont want steel gouging into soft aluminum hub body, so either get the stainless hub or get a better cassette with an aluminum(xtr) or composite(sram) spider.
    I think the extra $15 for the SS fw is cheaper than a new cassette.....

  3. #3
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    I Switched to the Steel Shell...

    about 9 months ago. I had been running a standard Shimano 11-32 cassette and the five lower cogs, the ones not attached by a spider, did indeed score the sheel enough after about 2 years of use (and frequent maintenance) that it was noticeable removing the cassette. When I decided to go with a Ti cassette from Cycle Dynamics, one with no spider and nine seperate cogs, i decided to go with the steel shell. Ordered one for $20-30 and used my CK tool to swap out. Very happy with the results. Is it noticeable when riding, of course not, do I know that the cogs will not score the SS shell, I do indeed and thats worth the small amount of work, money and the 48grams!!! Love King and wouldnever use another hub!!!!!

  4. #4
    Do It Yourself
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    Unless you are using a cassette with individual cogs, the alloy won't be a problem. I've had mine for 5 years with no troubles. The smaller cogs that are loose don't have near the torque of the bigger cogs that are on the carrier.

  5. #5
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    Good job! Alloy is fine, but....

    I'll chime in. If you're using spider cogs, the alloy driveshell is not really a problem. If you're using all loose cogs then you might want to consider a SS driveshell.

    I'm using an XTR spider cog and the alloy drive shell scored a bit initally in the area of small, loose cogs only. With the scoring, I never had a problem removing my XTR cassette from the driveshell. I only had a problem when I serviced the driveshell for the first time. I couldn't get the CK driveshell tool fit on the driveshell due to the scoring. The tolerences are so tight between the tool face and the driveshell that any slight imperfection on the driveshell spines prevented the tool from sliding onto the shell. I had to purchase some hobby files to gently work the splines back into shape.... then the tool fit perfectly... and its been perfect ever since... no more scoring has taken place since the initial break in.

    Good luck.... you will not regret the purchase.

    BTW... I'd recommend that you get yourself the CK hub service tool and some ring drive lube. The maintaince is so easy on these hubs that I'd feel like a fool paying someone else to do the work.
    My advice and $3 will buy you nothing more than a tunafish sandwich.

  6. #6
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    I've got about 3 seasons on my alloy king hubshell, and while I haven't had any problems it's pretty obvious it has taken some bad scorring/marks/dents from the cassette and I always run xt/xtr cassettes on it. I haven't had any real problems getting a cassette off of it, but it's obvious even on just the smaller loose cogs they have notched themselves into the alloy hubshell. I doubt they would ever work their way through the hubshell grooves but in retrospect I'd have taken the tiny weight penalty and went steel as well.

    So I would say that since you are not conserned about weight, definately go with the steel hubshell, it will just give you peace of mind in the long run.

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