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  1. #26
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    Pulled the trigger on the Hadley! Just need to fill up my shopping cart at chain reaction to get free shipping on the rotor and new adapter. Big problem is, I already have everything and am just picking up odds and ends right now (uhhh... I need slicks for when I convert my current ride to a commuter? And tubes/ tubeless system. That's about it...). Plus I over stretched myself when I made the decision to go with a 20mm through axle instead of sticking with what I have. The fork was $50 more, $50 for the new hub, $35 for the new rotor. $10 for a new adapter (I had already ordered one for a 203mm rotor) Ouch. Won't be able to afford to get it assembled for a couple months

    I think it will work out in the long run! Better hub, and better performance from a beefier axle.

    Thanks for all your help

  2. #27
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    For a front 20mm hub, you don't really have to that particular. If you're a clyde and/or hard on your gear, the rear hub is where you will benefit from spending more money and shopping wisely.

    If I was looking to build a 20mm wheel on a budget, I would jump on one of these in a heartbeat:

    Sett'E Components 32h 20mm Front Hub | eBay

    Wheelmaster Disc Front Hub Black 32h 20mm thru Axle Black | eBay

    New Marzocchi QR20 Hub Front 110 x 20 mm Through Axle 6 BOLT32 Hole 240 G | eBay

    I built a wheel for my son with one of the Marzocchi 20mm hubs a few years ago, and he has been beating the *s* out of it with no problems ever since.

    The Hadley for $50 is a great deal. It will serve you well.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Can my Shimano Fh-M756 hubs be converted to 20mm?-img_2056a.jpg  


  3. #28
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    I figure I will just ride the XT until I destroy it on the rear. I imagine it won't have an exceptional life, since it is the QR version. I hope to get a few years off it, I have read good things about the older ones (which this one is... 2008, I think?). From what people are saying, that Hadley was a purchase that will last for life I am hoping I can trade the spare XT for some credit towards the labor for assembly, since the wheelset came from him. He knows I haven't used it. I also have some extra new deore rim brakes I hope he can throw me a 20 dollar credit for. That should help me get it in sooner!

    Still waiting on some parts and to hear back from a shop if they can get a hold of my fork for me.

  4. #29
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    It took me a while to get strong enough to give XT (756) hubs more than they could stand. For an inexpensive rear hub, they (the 756 XT hubs) are about as good as it gets. Most people aren't heavy AND strong enough to hurt them that often. Once you start laying waste to the XT freehub though, you may as well count on spending at least $200-$250 for a rear hub alone (Hope Pro II would be the minimum I would recommend). Hadley makes a great rear hub for strong clyde types.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    I got the M675's for 90 bucks a pop!
    This BTW makes you a candidate for the Zent mod.

    Shimano Zent


    Magura

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    Pulled the trigger on the Hadley! Just need to fill up my shopping cart at chain reaction to get free shipping on the rotor and new adapter. Big problem is, I already have everything and am just picking up odds and ends right now (uhhh... I need slicks for when I convert my current ride to a commuter?
    Are you sporting wagon wheels or 26"?
    If 26" DMR Moto RT is the ticket for commuting, and they let you go off pavement as well to some extent.


    Magura

  7. #32
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    I am chuckling at the mod, because I build computers and the tech industry does the EXACT same kind of stuff! Many times, their lower end items are just neutered or down tuned versions of higher end stuff, since it is cheaper to make a ton of the same things and just remove or omit a couple parts to designate lower end models. Many times, you can do stuff like turn on extra cores in a processor or flash the BIOS of a video card to get the higher end performer for the price of the budget stuff It seems Shimano did the same thing! Same levers, they just omitted one freaking screw. I definitely will give it a try! I don't have a lathe handy (if only!) so I am going to have to go ghetto with a drill and file for that one The knob is great too, but it is a bit overkill for me. I can bust out an allen wrench if I need to make an adjustment And what is the tool called for removing the blanking screw? I suppose I can grab a screwdriver at the dollar store and modify it if the tool costs some silly amount.

    I had no idea the SLX didn't have both adjustments! I would have sorely disappointed when I went to set stuff up


    On the bike I am currently riding and converting to a commuter (let's call it the Diamondback, much easier!) it has standard 26" mountain bike rims. I want to put slicks on it because everything around here is paved. There is no chance I will need to go offroad with it once I get my mountain bike going, and if I do (like, as a backup bike) I can just put the knobbies back on it I hope to get a road bike by summer, mostly because the desert gets deathly hot at that point and it is dangerous to go mountain biking in the heat. That is our off season!

    Once I get that going, I am still undecided as to what to do with the Diamondback. I actually am really starting to enjoy the rigid ride, but haven't ridden a real mountain bike yet to compare to. If I find myself feeling that suspension is leaving a hole where the rigid used to fill, I might turn the Diamondback back into a mountain bike. If I am feeling like 'good riddance to rubbish', I will optimize it for an around town beater that I won't be afraid to leave chained up in the bad part of town (I work at a luxury resort and park my bike next to the security bikes in front of their office, which has a few cameras pointed at anyone who comes close. I have never felt a need to lock it up, and have never had a problem. Therefore I am not afraid to take a decent road bike to work and leave it there.)

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    I am chuckling at the mod, because I build computers and the tech industry does the EXACT same kind of stuff! Many times, their lower end items are just neutered or down tuned versions of higher end stuff, since it is cheaper to make a ton of the same things and just remove or omit a couple parts to designate lower end models. Many times, you can do stuff like turn on extra cores in a processor or flash the BIOS of a video card to get the higher end performer for the price of the budget stuff It seems Shimano did the same thing! Same levers, they just omitted one freaking screw. I definitely will give it a try! I don't have a lathe handy (if only!) so I am going to have to go ghetto with a drill and file for that one The knob is great too, but it is a bit overkill for me. I can bust out an allen wrench if I need to make an adjustment And what is the tool called for removing the blanking screw? I suppose I can grab a screwdriver at the dollar store and modify it if the tool costs some silly amount.

    I had no idea the SLX didn't have both adjustments! I would have sorely disappointed when I went to set stuff up
    Once you get your brakes, you can borrow my "stupid userunfriendly screw" driver (see pic in Zent thread).
    I made one of a tool from an implant template, from a spine surgical kit, I was modifying for a client back then. Sending forth and back should be cheap.


    Magura

  9. #34
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    I will drop you a line in a couple weeks once I have all my stuff together Thanks!

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    Pulled the trigger on the Hadley! Just need to fill up my shopping cart at chain reaction to get free shipping on the rotor and new adapter. Big problem is, I already have everything and am just picking up odds and ends right now (uhhh... I need slicks for when I convert my current ride to a commuter? And tubes/ tubeless system. That's about it...). Plus I over stretched myself when I made the decision to go with a 20mm through axle instead of sticking with what I have. The fork was $50 more, $50 for the new hub, $35 for the new rotor. $10 for a new adapter (I had already ordered one for a 203mm rotor) Ouch. Won't be able to afford to get it assembled for a couple months

    I think it will work out in the long run! Better hub, and better performance from a beefier axle.

    Thanks for all your help
    That was a mistake. Those old GT/Hadleys are non-standard, pre-IS disc hubs. Rotors are no longer made for them and the lateral rotor spacing is different than current standards.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    That was a mistake. Those old GT/Hadleys are non-standard, pre-IS disc hubs. Rotors are no longer made for them and the lateral rotor spacing is different than current standards.
    Worst case scenario, an adapter will take care of that. I've seen such some time ago.


    Magura

  12. #37
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    Dont the coda 4-bolt fit? I seem to recall the auction saying the spacing was 50mm between holes. I couldnt find any info on how coda 4-bolts were spaced, but they look right.

    Worst case scenario, I could get a centerlock rotor with lots of metal in the middle and drill some holes. Most likeley i can even rotate the coda one and drill new holes if the spacing is off. Rotors dont seem to be something to stress too much over. Cheap, lots of variety, buy one time. Something should fit!

  13. #38
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    Ok, never had a hub in my hand before, so how do I check a used hub for damage/ problems/ etc?

    It looks perfect, listing said it was a takeoff, never ridden. I believe it. I spun it, and it does not spin freely like one laced to a wheel. I can spin a wheel and it will spin and spin, but this hub doesn't move unless I am applying force. The movement feels smooth, but there is a very small of 'bumping' or 'clicking' (no sound), like a tiny index in it. Nothing feels like it is grinding, and it is silent. The movement is smooth except for the micro clicking. If it needs service, I will ask for an exchange (they listed another one). Does this sound normal? Any other way to test out a new (used) hub?

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    Ok, never had a hub in my hand before, so how do I check a used hub for damage/ problems/ etc?

    It looks perfect, listing said it was a takeoff, never ridden. I believe it. I spun it, and it does not spin freely like one laced to a wheel. I can spin a wheel and it will spin and spin, but this hub doesn't move unless I am applying force. The movement feels smooth, but there is a very small of 'bumping' or 'clicking' (no sound), like a tiny index in it. Nothing feels like it is grinding, and it is silent. The movement is smooth except for the micro clicking. If it needs service, I will ask for an exchange (they listed another one). Does this sound normal? Any other way to test out a new (used) hub?
    That sounds normal enough for a 15 year old hub.
    Cleaning and greasing it up will do the trick.

    Old grease plus all the dirt and dust of 15 years in the back of a shop.....


    Magura

  15. #40
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    Do I need to open it up?

    The hub is squeaky clean, looks like new other than barely discernible scuffs on spoke holes. It looks like it was taken off years ago, wrapped up, and kept in storage. I looked up stuff about opening up the hubs, and it is pretty finicky. There are talks about clean rooms and such!

    Because it was never used and it was stored well, is it possible it is clean and just needs some new grease? That sounds a lot less scary than disassembling the thing in a clean room

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    Do I need to open it up?

    The hub is squeaky clean, looks like new other than barely discernible scuffs on spoke holes. It looks like it was taken off years ago, wrapped up, and kept in storage. I looked up stuff about opening up the hubs, and it is pretty finicky. There are talks about clean rooms and such!

    Because it was never used and it was stored well, is it possible it is clean and just needs some new grease? That sounds a lot less scary than disassembling the thing in a clean room
    Clean rooms and stuff like that, is maybe a bit over the top

    You do need to open it up, and get rid of the old grease though.
    I usually take everything apart, and throw it in a jar with some petroleum or lamp oil.

    Once clean, a sheet of white paper and grease in a syringe does the trick.
    Taking it apart is no big deal. Just be careful not to damage the seals.

    http://www.sicklines.com/tech-info/hadley/H500145.pdf


    Magura

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Magura View Post
    Worst case scenario, an adapter will take care of that. I've seen such some time ago.


    Magura
    For between $37 and $85 Chainreaction offers a bunch of hubs that do not need hard to find adaptors or rotors. Would have been a much better option
    mtbtires.com
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  18. #43
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    I went with the Hadley because I thought I would be getting a much better hub for the money... My other options were an XT or Zee.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    I went with the Hadley because I thought I would be getting a much better hub for the money...
    And that is what you got
    One of the best hubs out there.

    Opposed to the El Cheapo hubs, they don't eat bearings for breakfast, and basic maintenance will keep them running.
    Most of the cheaper hubs, are hit and miss. Some are ok, some are even quite ok, but most manufacturers of cheaper hub, make them with bigger tolerances, and have consistency issues.
    A good example is Hope.
    I have had a few of their hubs over the years. Most were fine.
    The front hub from the last set I bought, eats at least a set of bearings a year.
    Similar experiences are common.


    Magura

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