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  1. #1
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    Boost 148 adapters

    Hope will be offering disc brake spacers and new end caps to make existing 142 x 12 hubs fit into a Boost frame:

    EB15: Hope Tech goes orange, shows new hubs, brakes, cassette and much more

    Is there any reason why other companies can't do this? Mavic for example has all sorts of end caps for their Crossmax wheels - qr, 10x135, 12x142.

    I'm looking at getting a new frame (a SC Bronson). It's a lot less expansive to keep my existing wheels (which I really like too) but because they're 142 that would mean getting the 2015 Bronson. The just-released version is Boost, as are many new frames.

    It's a lot easier and less expensive to simply get a new frame, rather than frame and wheels. The rear Boost adapters would solve that.

  2. #2
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    Cool idea about the adapters. But i thought boost was all about changing the hubs flange spacing for more bracing angle on the spokes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by caRpetbomBer View Post
    Cool idea about the adapters. But i thought boost was all about changing the hubs flange spacing for more bracing angle on the spokes.
    It is, but I think many people (myself included) are skeptical of any real gains in stiffness it will provide and would like to use our "old" non-Boost wheelsets on Boost framesets.
    "So you think it's the hat?... A lot of people hate this hat. It angers a lot of people, just the sight of it." - Uncle Buck

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    Another interesting tidbit ralated to this topic is a guy on the Specialized forum took a rear 148 boost wheel of a loaner 6Fattie and placed it in his Enduro 142+ dropouts just to see how much it wouldn't fit by. Surprise, it slid right in snugly with no forcing. Seems to be some chicanery involved with this new boost standard stuff at least from an untrained eye

  5. #5
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    It may not be a permanent fix but as inonjoey said it would allow the use of existing wheelsets in new frames - and unfortunately there are many - that are only coming with Boost rears.

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    What about cassette spacing?

    The spacer corrects for the rotor, the end caps correct for the width, but the cassette will still be in the wrong spot?
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    What about cassette spacing?

    The spacer corrects for the rotor, the end caps correct for the width, but the cassette will still be in the wrong spot?
    Someone will come out with all of the correct crap to make it work, I'm sure. We are talking about 6mm of earth shattering, industry changing, performance multiplying radness, after all.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
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    Quote Originally Posted by inonjoey View Post
    Someone will come out with all of the correct crap to make it work, I'm sure. We are talking about 6mm of earth shattering, industry changing, performance multiplying radness, after all.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    The cassette spacing (from the centerline of the bike) is wider with boost, but you can't space the freehub body out away from the hub shell, so converting a rear hub would would require pushing the whole hub 3mm to the DS to get the cassette where it needs to be, then space out the NDS with a 6mm longer endcap and a brake rotor spacer (6mm thick). And then, you'd need to re-dish the rim, moving it 3mm back towards the NDS to get it centered in the frame. Depending on the spoke lengths used for your wheel, you may or may not be able to redish it.

    Converting a front hub, you could either leaving the hub shell in place and use 5mm longer endcaps on each side and a 5mm brake spacer, or you could move the hub 5mm to the NDS, use a 10mm longer DS end cap, and re-dish the rim.

    Longer brake bolts with a spacer...eh, I don't like the sound of that personally.

    None of these are ideal. I'd get new wheels to go with a new frame if it was Boost. The additional stiffness would be nice, and no rigged up longer brake bolts.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgaddis1 View Post
    The cassette spacing (from the centerline of the bike) is wider with boost, but you can't space the freehub body out away from the hub shell, so converting a rear hub would would require pushing the whole hub 3mm to the DS to get the cassette where it needs to be, then space out the NDS with a 6mm longer endcap and a brake rotor spacer (6mm thick). And then, you'd need to re-dish the rim, moving it 3mm back towards the NDS to get it centered in the frame. Depending on the spoke lengths used for your wheel, you may or may not be able to redish it.

    Converting a front hub, you could either leaving the hub shell in place and use 5mm longer endcaps on each side and a 5mm brake spacer, or you could move the hub 5mm to the NDS, use a 10mm longer DS end cap, and re-dish the rim.

    Longer brake bolts with a spacer...eh, I don't like the sound of that personally.

    None of these are ideal. I'd get new wheels to go with a new frame if it was Boost. The additional stiffness would be nice, and no rigged up longer brake bolts.
    Well Hope seems to be making it work.
    Could be that they just go with 3mm end caps on either side and a 3mm spacer for the brake rotor.
    Then leave the cassette where it is. Not ideal chainline but it would work.
    Again, not as good as dedicated Boost wheels but allows you to use existing wheels in new Boost frames.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgaddis1 View Post
    The cassette spacing (from the centerline of the bike) is wider with boost, but you can't space the freehub body out away from the hub shell, so converting a rear hub would would require pushing the whole hub 3mm to the DS to get the cassette where it needs to be, then space out the NDS with a 6mm longer endcap and a brake rotor spacer (6mm thick). And then, you'd need to re-dish the rim, moving it 3mm back towards the NDS to get it centered in the frame. Depending on the spoke lengths used for your wheel, you may or may not be able to redish it.

    Converting a front hub, you could either leaving the hub shell in place and use 5mm longer endcaps on each side and a 5mm brake spacer, or you could move the hub 5mm to the NDS, use a 10mm longer DS end cap, and re-dish the rim.

    Longer brake bolts with a spacer...eh, I don't like the sound of that personally.

    None of these are ideal. I'd get new wheels to go with a new frame if it was Boost. The additional stiffness would be nice, and no rigged up longer brake bolts.
    Interesting. hadn't thought of it that way.

    Super wide flange spacing is sometimes deemed awesome, but others (Bill Shook with American Classic, for example) have other thoughts on how to skin that cat.

    The AM Classic MTB225 rear hub, for example, actually spaces the non-drive side hub flange inboard (away from the rotor, towards the center of the hub) for better dish and better balance of spoke tension (on a symmetrical rim).

    Boost 148 adapters-61145.jpg
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  11. #11
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    Boost hub hack

    2 of these spacers (custom CNC'ed for a few bucks) on each side of the rear hub and 3mm of disc rotor spacers would let you use your current 142x12 hubs on a 148 Boosted rear triangle. You'll just have to adjust the RD 3mm further inward (works with Shimano 10 speed + 40T One-up cog). The standard Shimano disc bolts were long enough even with the rotor spacers.

    Been on a few rides on this hack and no issues so far, even with a few hard climbs and heavy braking. Chainline remains the same, with a standard crankset.

    Boost 148 adapters-12mm-x-3-spacers.jpg

  12. #12
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    Mingloid: this is exactly what I was talking about.
    I figured the rotor spacers are not a big deal and the RD could handle the 3mm difference.
    It was the end cap spacers for the hub I wondered about.
    Would these simply slide into the dropouts and your existing hubs would fit?

  13. #13
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    jon123, Yes! Their external diameter of 19mm would just fit into the recess in the frame. You'll have to hold them in place while sliding in the 148x12 axle. I put a dab of shoe-goo (or blu-tack / nail polish / loctite, etc) on the frame side of the spacers. The spacers would stay in place on the frame after that, so you don't have to fiddle with the spacers the next time you put your wheel on.

    A 'not recommended' hack would be run run your 142x12 wheels directly on your 148 frame. The frame will flex inwards 3mm per side (which is hardly anything), and you'll need a 142 axle to clamp everything securely. I ran this for a weekend while waiting for the spacers to get done.

  14. #14
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    Mingloid: Brilliant!
    I was thinking each manufacturer would have to make their own end caps. Like what Hope is doing.
    Your solution is very clever. You should sell them - I'll be your first customer.
    For me this is no small fix. I was going to go with my second choice for a new frame (HD3) because my first choice (new Bronson) has Boost. A) I like my wheels a lot and B) the Canadian dollar is terrible against the U.S. right now so getting a new frame AND wheel set was not ideal.
    Thank you. Please keep us posted on how this is working out for you.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mingloid View Post
    Chainline remains the same, with a standard crankset
    Makes perfect sense!
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  16. #16
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    Here's what it looks like on the inside of the rear triangle, and bolted up.
    Boost 148 adapters-boost-148-hack.jpg

    These are the sketches I gave to the machine shop.
    Boost 148 adapters-2015-09-15-16.01.59.jpg

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mingloid View Post
    Here's what it looks like on the inside of the rear triangle, and bolted up.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Boost 148 hack.jpg 
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ID:	1018442

    These are the sketches I gave to the machine shop.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2015-09-15 16.01.59.jpg 
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    Excellent. So simple. It's almost too good to be true. And rotor spacers will be provided by Hope.

  18. #18
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    Get the Hope spacers here :
    Hope Rotor Spacer | Chain Reaction Cycles

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mingloid View Post
    Get the Hope spacers here :
    Hope Rotor Spacer | Chain Reaction Cycles
    Nice. Thanks.

  20. #20
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    Mingloid: Do you think it's an issue or concern the end caps are not sitting in the dropouts? Just resting on the axle.
    I don't know if it's possible for a 12mm thru axle to break but if it does the wheels are not secured in the dropouts.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    Mingloid: Do you think it's an issue or concern the end caps are not sitting in the dropouts? Just resting on the axle.
    I don't know if it's possible for a 12mm thru axle to break but if it does the wheels are not secured in the dropouts.
    How is the wheel any more secure in the dropouts if the axle breaks on a boost spaced hub....? Not sure what dropouts you are using, but my rear wheel just slides right out when the axle is removed. If one side were to somehow snap on my axle, the wheel is still going to instantly slant to one side in the rear triangle with the rear tire massively rubbing on it and probably cause terrible wreck, probably destroying my brake rotor in the process. I don't think any magic would prevent that from happening.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idaho View Post
    How is the wheel any more secure in the dropouts if the axle breaks on a boost spaced hub....? Not sure what dropouts you are using, but my rear wheel just slides right out when the axle is removed. If one side were to somehow snap on my axle, the wheel is still going to instantly slant to one side in the rear triangle with the rear tire massively rubbing on it and probably cause terrible wreck, probably destroying my brake rotor in the process. I don't think any magic would prevent that from happening.
    That's one thing I was wondering. Is it any more secure wih dropouts? I know the 12 x 150 standard did NOT use dropouts, though the newer 12 x 157 does.
    My wheel slots into the dropout and feels fairly secure but of course that's just resting on the ground, not moving and with no weight on it.
    Maybe actually riding their would be no difference if the axle broke whether or not it was in the dropouts.
    Also I'm guessing there is very little chance an axle that thick would break?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    Mingloid: Do you think it's an issue or concern the end caps are not sitting in the dropouts? Just resting on the axle.
    I don't know if it's possible for a 12mm thru axle to break but if it does the wheels are not secured in the dropouts.
    Hmmm.... good points. I'm betting (with this hack) on a couple of things :

    1. The hub does not rest/rely on the shoulder in the dropout.
    This is visible on QR15 forks, and a little less on 142 rears.

    2. The clamping force of the axle is enough to keep everything pushed together as 1 unit.
    Imagine the older skinny quick releases keeping the front wheel in place during heavy disc braking and the rear in place on road bikes in an all-out sprint.

    3. My 160lb bodyweight and inablity to take huge air should keep things way below the safety factor.

    4. If grade 5 Ti bolts can be used on rotors, then grade 12 steel bolts should be OK, even with 3mm spacers.

    I wish I have the ability to do the calculations or computer simulations, but I'm just going by guesstimations that this should have plenty of safety factor (for me and my riding style).

    Any one else wanna try this? Hahaha.... I promise to post any news of failure here. Wish me luck!

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    I couldn't build a new rear wheel yet anyway, no 350 6 bolt hubs are out. This lets you get the tire space benefits right away with a 35mm ID or wider rim and get the hub when you want later.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mingloid View Post
    Here's what it looks like on the inside of the rear triangle, and bolted up.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Boost 148 hack.jpg 
Views:	2398 
Size:	94.0 KB 
ID:	1018442

    These are the sketches I gave to the machine shop.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2015-09-15 16.01.59.jpg 
Views:	1014 
Size:	49.1 KB 
ID:	1018446

    Just out of curiosity what bike did you do this on?

    It seams so simple, I just need to find a machine shop that can do this.

  26. #26
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    Mingloid
    Any update on how this has been working out for you?

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    One up, Wolftooth, etc. need to start making adapter kits asap.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmar123 View Post
    One up, Wolftooth, etc. need to start making adapter kits asap.
    We are listening and monitoring.

    @dgaddis1 summed up the challenges and options well.

    -Brendan
    wolftoothcomponents.com

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by WolfTooth View Post
    We are listening and monitoring.

    @dgaddis1 summed up the challenges and options well.

    -Brendan
    I think dgaddis1 is overthinking it....

    like what mingloid has:
    2 3mm spacers on each side to accommodate axle width
    1 3mm spacer behind the brake rotor to push that outwards
    leave cassette where it is and make a goat link for the rear deralliuer that pushes it in 3mm...boom!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmar123 View Post
    I think dgaddis1 is overthinking it....

    like what mingloid has:
    2 3mm spacers on each side to accommodate axle width
    1 3mm spacer behind the brake rotor to push that outwards
    leave cassette where it is and make a goat link for the rear deralliuer that pushes it in 3mm...boom!
    Agree 100% on both counts.
    dgaddis1 is overthinking it.
    And a reasonable solution is not out of the question.
    Boom indeed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    Mingloid
    Any update on how this has been working out for you?
    Working great! No creaks, braking, nor shifting problems. The RD (XTR 10sp) seems to be handling the 3mm inboard adjustment without a fuss.

    The important thing is to torque down everything to spec, so the forces are handled by the tension in the disc bolts and hub axle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mingloid View Post
    Working great! No creaks, braking, nor shifting problems. The RD (XTR 10sp) seems to be handling the 3mm inboard adjustment without a fuss.

    The important thing is to torque down everything to spec, so the forces are handled by the tension in the disc bolts and hub axle.
    You could make the spacers even more bomber that would provide additional support to the hub

    By adding an additional step on the inside of the spacer that the hub end would plug into and then the outside of the 3mm spacer would plug into the frame...bomber!

    This is based off of a DT swiss 12 x 142 hub

  33. #33
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    one more...

    F-BOOST

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    Quote Originally Posted by dmar123 View Post
    one more...

    F-BOOST
    Be careful......you just let the cat out of the bag! The top "boost" executives will be mad you came up with this and ruined their profit grabbing.

    WolfTooth......when can you have this kit available?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmar123 View Post
    one more...

    F-BOOST

    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    WolfTooth......when can you have this kit available?
    This is so clever. Nicely done.

    Now we just need WolfTooth, OneUp to build them.

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    Not sure, but looks like notubes might have something for their Neo Hubs.
    KIT, NEO, END CAPS, REAR, 12X142/148/157 TA

    Unfortunately I have the 3.3 hubs I bought this summer. Maybe they'll come out with endcaps for those too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by riding29 View Post
    Not sure, but looks like notubes might have something for their Neo Hubs.
    KIT, NEO, END CAPS, REAR, 12X142/148/157 TA

    Unfortunately I have the 3.3 hubs I bought this summer. Maybe they'll come out with endcaps for those too.
    yeah if you could just get wider end caps that would eliminate the need for the spacers...but if no wider end caps are available having a universal spacer that would work with most/all hubs could be the way to go

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    I prefer dgaddis1 thinking. Re dish the rim over and you get a better bracing angle on the drive side and the intended chain angle. Although 6 mm of disc spacing might be a bit much.

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    So this is interesting: Specialized is working on a kit for their Roval wheels to convert 142 to 148.
    Posted in the Roval Questions thread, from their spokesman:

    @steelyUK- Glad to hear you like the wheels. yes, we are working on kits right now, they should be available early next year. To make thing simple we are just going to offer them as complete kits, so you will have some extra front endcaps and spacer if you ever upgrade your fork. We wanted to keep the cassette in the same spot so for 142->148 conversions you will use your existing DS endcap, and a +6mm NDS end cap and rotor spacer. The kit will come with longer rotor bolts. This will also require your wheel to be re-dished 3mm.

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    re dish the wheel = me not interested.

    So If I ever want to re-use these wheels on a normal 142 bike again or sell them i have to dish them back? no thanks. Not to mention the additional costs and time in having to bring your wheel to a bike shop to have it re dished. Good luck doing it yourself...not saying you can't but be prepared to spend some coin on additional tools like a truing stand, dish tool, and tension meter. Mise well just buy a new boost hub at this point.

    Also re dishing your nice carbon ENVE wheel yourself and most likely it will be your first time ever dishing a wheel, may void the warranty.

    2- 3mm end cap spacers, 1- 3mm rotor spacer, and 1 -3mm link for derailleur = no messing with wheel = easy done. no bike shops, no extra costs.

    and if you REALLY want to get nutty you could probably make a front chainring with 3mm of inset to match the rear derailleur link inset. but I doubt the chainline will make much fuss over an 3mm alignment difference.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmar123 View Post
    re dish the wheel = me not interested.

    So If I ever want to re-use these wheels on a normal 142 bike again or sell them i have to dish them back? no thanks. Not to mention the additional costs and time in having to bring your wheel to a bike shop to have it re dished. Good luck doing it yourself...not saying you can't but be prepared to spend some coin on additional tools like a truing stand, dish tool, and tension meter. Mise well just buy a new boost hub at this point.

    Also re dishing your nice carbon ENVE wheel yourself and most likely it will be your first time ever dishing a wheel, may void the warranty.

    2- 3mm end cap spacers, 1- 3mm rotor spacer, and 1 -3mm link for derailleur = no messing with wheel = easy done. no bike shops, no extra costs.

    and if you REALLY want to get nutty you could probably make a front chainring with 3mm of inset to match the rear derailleur link inset. but I doubt the chainline will make much fuss over an 3mm alignment difference.
    dmar123
    Do you think running just the spacers is completely secure? As opposed to having end caps slot into the frame dropouts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    dmar123
    Do you think running just the spacers is completely secure? As opposed to having end caps slot into the frame dropouts.
    I think if you designed the spacers like I have it where the end caps plug into the spacers it would be secure. Im not an engineer but it makes sense. It would make the spacer and end cap act as a whole unit rather then having a possible shear force where the end cap and just a washer style spacer would meet.

    Ideally if you could get replacement end caps that are 3mm wider then your stock end caps would be the best then you don't have any additional pieces. But was thinking the spacers could be more universal if someone were to make an after market kit then making a whole end cap?????

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    3mm endcaps seems like all you would need, the derailleur should be able to move that far.
    My Remedy had the Boost chainring which was 3mm outward, seems like if you ran a standard ring setup with the 3mm spacers on the wheel the chainline would be ok.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dmar123 View Post
    You could make the spacers even more bomber that would provide additional support to the hub

    By adding an additional step on the inside of the spacer that the hub end would plug into and then the outside of the 3mm spacer would plug into the frame...bomber!

    This is based off of a DT swiss 12 x 142 hub
    Nice drawing. But there's zero material between the large part of the spacer and the small part. Why create all the extra complexity? Moving the derailleur seems silly.

    Just use a 6mm spacer on the non-drive side, re-dish by 3mm, and add a hope disc spacer or two.

    The bonus is you end up with more equal spoke tension, more equal spoke bracing angles, and stronger/stiffer wheel. Almost as good as boost148.

    Redishing isn't particularly hard. Do half a turn looser at each drive side nipple and a half turn tighter on each non-drive side. Measure, then repeat as necessary.

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    Not saying that your idea is not good, it is but,


    Moving the derailleur doesnt seem as silly as dishing the wheel and when I say move the derailleur I mean adjusting it. Atleast you could swap wheels between bikes without dishing the wheel again, thats the only reason I want to do this, I have several sets of wheels I would like to EASILY swap between my bikes.

    3mm spacers, (not a sleeve) and just moving the derailleur seems like the most obvious way to do it. Plus non Boost spider for chainline.
    Last edited by Carl.D; 11-15-2015 at 07:40 AM.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl.D View Post
    Not saying that your idea is good, it is but,


    Moving the derailleur doesnt seem as silly as dishing the wheel and when I say move the derailleur I mean adjusting it. Atleast you could swap wheels between bikes without dishing the wheel again, thats the only reason I want to do this, I have several sets of wheels I would like to EASILY swap between my bikes.

    3mm spacers, (not a sleeve) and just moving the derailleur seems like the most obvious way to do it. Plus non Boost spider for chainline.
    I'd have to agree.
    The 6mm non drive side spacer and re-dishing the wheel is what Roval is doing and may be the "best" solution.
    BUT I think for pure simplicity the most practical solution is the idea of putting 3mm spacers on each side. I think if we hope to get Wolf Tooth / Problem Solvers involved then that's going to be the way to go. It's the most universal.
    Sounds like the rear dérailleur can be adjusted over 3mm without any extra part but I do like dmar123's idea of the Goat Link type attachment to move it in 3mm.

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    If your going to build a Boost frame bike then I think the dish idea would be great too, especially if your going to dedicate one set of wheels to it and not swap stuff around.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl.D View Post
    If your going to build a Boost frame bike then I think the dish idea would be great too, especially if your going to dedicate one set of wheels to it and not swap stuff around.
    Agreed. I don't see what the big deal is with re-dishing the wheel when it's going to be used on a Boost bike. Since I just invested in a set of CK/Velocity Blunt wheels, this is a very attractive option for my next build (assuming it's a Boost frame).
    "So you think it's the hat?... A lot of people hate this hat. It angers a lot of people, just the sight of it." - Uncle Buck

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    Re dishing a wheel is very simple job. If the intent is to use older non boost wheels in a new boost frame, that is the smartest thing to do. But if you want to use one set of wheels to swap back forth between a boost bike and another non boost bike than a spacer on each side is logical. Don't take this an insult but a person that thinks re dishing once is a big deal does not have the mechanical knowledge to form a valid comment.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by someoldfart View Post
    Re dishing a wheel is very simple job. If the intent is to use older non boost wheels in a new boost frame, that is the smartest thing to do. But if you want to use one set of wheels to swap back forth between a boost bike and another non boost bike than a spacer on each side is logical. Don't take this an insult but a person that thinks re dishing once is a big deal does not have the mechanical knowledge to form a valid comment.
    What's the advantage of going the route of the re dished wheel and 6mm non drive side spacer? Versus just going with 3mm spacers on either side.

    And another question: is the re dishing amount just 3mm?

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    Better spoke angle, more even tension between each side equals stronger wheel. Plus the cassette will be in the correct relationship with the derailleur. That said 3 mm isn't very much. Until the chain bounces off the 11 or 10 into gap between that last cog and dropout. To me it would be better to use an asymmetric rim than this boost bullcrap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by someoldfart View Post
    Re dishing a wheel is very simple job. If the intent is to use older non boost wheels in a new boost frame, that is the smartest thing to do. But if you want to use one set of wheels to swap back forth between a boost bike and another non boost bike than a spacer on each side is logical. Don't take this an insult but a person that thinks re dishing once is a big deal does not have the mechanical knowledge to form a valid comment.
    No one is saying that re dishing a wheel is a tough job, dishing a wheel back and forth to fit two different frames is just simple non since when you can just add the spacers. If you going to use the wheel on the boost frame only then I agree that it may be the best way to go, but who wants to dish a wheel every time you want to swap them to other bikes.
    Again if your wanting to use the wheels from one bike to another then 3mm spacers on each side with non boost spider is just the easiest way and be able to swap wheels back to you other ride or rides.

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    Who rides in the 11 or 10, hell I cant even pedal down hill on the road in the 10 tooth cog, LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl.D View Post
    No one is saying that re dishing a wheel is a tough job, dishing a wheel back and forth to fit two different frames is just simple non since when you can just add the spacers. If you going to use the wheel on the boost frame only then I agree that it may be the best way to go, but who wants to dish a wheel every time you want to swap them to other bikes.
    Again if your wanting to use the wheels from one bike to another then 3mm spacers on each side with non boost spider is just the easiest way and be able to swap wheels back to you other ride or rides.
    actually someone did.

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    For someone to re dish their own wheel who has never done it before or doesn't have the proper tools it would be an expensive and tough job....most likely those people will be bringing their wheels into a shop to have it re dished which will cost them money...anyone know off hand how much a shop charges to re dish a wheel?

    but whatever, hopefully both options will become available and people can choose whatever they want
    Last edited by dmar123; 11-16-2015 at 09:02 AM.

  56. #56
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    First of the adapter kits that I've seen. Would still really like to see Wolf Tooth / OneUp / Problem Solvers come out with their own

    MTB Tools Adapter SET FOR A 12mm X 142mm Rear HUB TO 148mm Boost Application | eBay

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    yep maybe we can get some annodizing too! would probably be a lot cheaper to make a spacer then a whole new end cap

    some examples of other spacer kits




    maybe just a regular ol washer style spacer would be fine after all

  58. #58
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    I received the adapter kit from the eBay link above.
    Haven't installed it yet but it looks good. All the measurements are bang on.
    OneUp says they will NOT be producing a kit.
    I emailed Wolf Tooth to ask but they never responded.
    Problem Solvers were great. Responded right away and said they'd look in to it. We'll see ...

  59. #59
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    I just messaged this dude through eBay to make a 6mm spacer. I already bought 6mm worth of hope spacers from crc, but could've got the them as a kit from him.

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    I made spacers by drilling out 5/16 washers. They do the job just fine, but without a way to move your dérailleur in the two big cogs become unusable.
    So I'm just going to run the spacer on the non-drive side and re-dish my wheel.

    With all the washers moved to one side it all seems a bit janky.

    I just messaged this dude through eBay to make a 6mm spacer. I already bought 6mm worth of hope spacers from crc, but could've got the them as a kit from him. I'll post pics when I get it sorted.

  61. #61
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    PurpleMtnSlayer
    So you tried 3mm spacers on each side (DS and NDS) and found the dérailleur couldn't shift into the 2 biggest cogs?
    I would have thought the dérailleur would be able to accommodate for extra the 3mm it has to shift.

  62. #62
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    I could make with work with a Shimano 1x10 set-up. XTR RD with One-up 40T cog. Anyone have feedback on SRAM or Shimano 1x11 systems?

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    I take that back. With a ten speed xt shifter, der and cassette, I can shift into the big cog, but it wants to jump down.

    I've got an xo1 11speed setup I'll be installing when I get the 6mm shim and re-dish the wheel. I'll let you know how that goes.

  64. #64
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    pics
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Boost 148 adapters-img_9025.jpg  

    Boost 148 adapters-img_9026.jpg  

    Boost 148 adapters-img_9027.jpg  


  65. #65
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    PurpleMtnSlayer
    Please keep us posted.
    I'm getting my Boost frame (new Santa Cruz 5010) and will be starting with the 3mm spacers on each side. Using the adapter kit from eBay.
    I'll be interested to hear how option B is working for you: the 6mm nds spacer and redishing the wheel.
    I'm guessing shifting will be better with that option but I wonder how such a large spacer will work on the axle AND on the brake disc.

  66. #66
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    Option B ftw. Took me about 10 minutes to redish the wheel. And only cost $12 for the 6mm axle spacer, and two 2mm rotor spacers with hardware.

    Everything lined up perfectly, felt stiff and shifting was flawless.

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    ... *duplicate post deleted*
    Last edited by Mingloid; 12-06-2015 at 07:57 PM. Reason: *duplicate post*

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    Option B ftw. Took me about 10 minutes to redish the wheel. And only cost $12 for the 6mm axle spacer, and two 2mm rotor spacers with hardware.

    Everything lined up perfectly, felt stiff and shifting was flawless.

    Plus.... u end up with a rim that's better centered between the hub flanges. Nice!

  69. #69
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    Thanks for the update. Nice to know there's a 2nd option. I'll likely order a second 3mm disc spacer so I can try this option at some point.

    Question for you: is it possible to re-dish the wheel simply using a truing stand? Or do you need the dishing tool? I'm wondering if the 3mm can be measured just on the truing stand alone, and if so how?

    Thanks.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    PurpleMtnSlayer
    Thanks for the update. Nice to know there's a 2nd option. I'll likely order a second 3mm disc spacer so I can try this option at some point.

    Question for you: is it possible to re-dish the wheel simply using a truing stand? Or do you need the dishing tool? I'm wondering if the 3mm can be measured just on the truing stand alone, and if so how?

    Thanks.
    FWIW I was able to get away with just 4 mm of rotor spacing with a Saint caliper on a pivot mach 6 C2. I was also able to re-dish the wheel mounted on the bike using just a standard caliper, a pencil and spoke wrench. I started by loosening the drive side spokes half a turn then tightening the non-drive side half a turn. The seat stays on the frame are symmetrical so I just continued to move the rim over a quarter turn at a time until the spread between the rim and seat stays was equal on both sides. I didn't have a spoke tension wrench to use so I just went on a quick ride and checked the spokes by hand. Lastly I used the pencil to mark any high spots and fine-tuned from there.

    If you want to do it in a truing stand just drop the wheel in the stand with the 6 mm axle spacer on the non-drive side and center the rim from there.

  71. #71
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    I've found this

    https://www.facebook.com/Taurusmtbsolutions/

    He makes dedicated end cap adapters to convert individual manufacturers' hubs from 142 to 148. This is the best solution I've seen yet.

  72. #72
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    I went out on my first ride with the simple spacer kit from eBay while I await the dedicated end caps from Taurus mtb solutions.

    So 3mm spacer on either side and a 3mm spacer for the rotor.

    I could not notice a difference between shifting with this set up and on my previous 142x12 bike (everything the same - rear dérailleur, cassette, chain).

    Boost 148 adapters-image.jpg
    Last edited by jon123; 12-24-2015 at 08:13 PM.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    I've found this

    https://www.facebook.com/Taurusmtbsolutions/

    He makes dedicated end cap adapters to convert individual manufacturers' hubs from 142 to 148. This is the best solution I've seen yet.
    Best solution I've seen yet: Don't buy a Boost bike.

    If enough people do it 2016, it will be gone soon.

    A great opportunity for the industry to learn they will eventually kill the cow at their speed of saying what worked for years is outdated trash now.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    I've found this

    https://www.facebook.com/Taurusmtbsolutions/

    He makes dedicated end cap adapters to convert individual manufacturers' hubs from 142 to 148. This is the best solution I've seen yet.
    ^nice

    also good to hear people are running spacers without any shifting issues.

  75. #75
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    Lindarets Boostinator

    Hey guys,

    We've been sharing your pain (and following this thread) for some time and can finally share what we feel is the most complete standard-to-Boost solution yet.

    Essentially what's been called "Option B", the Lindarets Boostinator is a hub-specific kit that replaces existing hub end caps with longer versions and, in the case of rear models, adds a rotor spacer and set of high-strength bolts. Once installed, all parts remain with the hub and wheel dish is reduced.

    While a dedicated hub will always be the ideal solution, not everyone wants or needs to replace everything at once. We're open to more models than are shown on the website now (and have a number designed)- just let us know if there's anything in particular you'd be interested and we'll see if we can get the quantities to make it work. Thanks!

    Marc

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Lindarets View Post
    Hey guys,

    We've been sharing your pain (and following this thread) for some time and can finally share what we feel is the most complete standard-to-Boost solution yet.

    Essentially what's been called "Option B", the Lindarets Boostinator is a hub-specific kit that replaces existing hub end caps with longer versions and, in the case of rear models, adds a rotor spacer and set of high-strength bolts. Once installed, all parts remain with the hub and wheel dish is reduced.

    While a dedicated hub will always be the ideal solution, not everyone wants or needs to replace everything at once. We're open to more models than are shown on the website now (and have a number designed)- just let us know if there's anything in particular you'd be interested and we'll see if we can get the quantities to make it work. Thanks!

    Marc
    Looks good, this should make many people happy.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Looks good, this should make many people happy.
    BluPitch,

    Thanks! We certainly hope so. New frames and forks are expensive enough, without adding new (or rebuilt) wheels into the mix.

    Speaking of looks, I forgot to add a photo. Let's fix that:

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Lindarets View Post
    BluPitch,

    Thanks! We certainly hope so. New frames and forks are expensive enough, without adding new (or rebuilt) wheels into the mix.

    Speaking of looks, I forgot to add a photo. Let's fix that:
    Way to think of the consumer! And thanks for listening.

    Now can you add Mavic to your list of hubs? Specifically a rear end cap that would fit the current Crossmax line.

  79. #79
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    As stated I went for option B and couldn't be happier. Its super easy to get set up and there are nearly zero sacrifices compared to a proper boost hub.

    Can't go wrong with this solution! The Lindarets finishing quality looks great, I'd also take their "high strength" hardware over the stuff I got at Lowes.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    ...Can't go wrong with this solution! The Lindarets finishing quality looks great, I'd also take their "high strength" hardware over the stuff I got at Lowes.
    Thanks Purple!

    That said, if your Lowes bolts aren't marked on the head with "10.9" or "12.4", please contact us through our website- I'd be happy to send out a set for $6.50 ($3.50 of which is postage, padded mailer, and label).

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    Way to think of the consumer! And thanks for listening.

    Now can you add Mavic to your list of hubs? Specifically a rear end cap that would fit the current Crossmax line.

    Jon,
    You bet! Drop us a line through the website with the model and quantity you'd be looking for- we need about 50-100 sales to make the numbers work at current prices, and we've got a spreadsheet started.

  82. #82
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    May be quite awhile before you get 50-100 orders for Mavic Crossmax hubs unfortunately. Don't think they're overly popular.

    In the meantime is it possible to place an order for just your bolts and the rotor spacer? And I'd use spacers on the non-drive side.

  83. #83
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    Any chance of making something for a Chris King rear hub?

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Draper View Post
    Any chance of making something for a Chris King rear hub?
    Rick,

    The Kings are a little more involved, unfortunately, as adapting their hubs (front or rear) requires replacing the entire axle. Not that it can't be done, but we'll have to spend some more time and price it out before committing.

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    Just noticed this thread. Roval we be coming out with adapter kits for all of our current iterations of Control and Traverse wheels in early 2016. Like one of the other users posted, we will have kits with updated endcaps for front and rear hubs, rotor spacers, and updated bolts. Dishing the rear wheel will be necessary.

  86. #86
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    That's a nice kit Marc. It's now opened up the option of secondhand wheels for my boost frame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Lindarets View Post
    Hey guys,

    We've been sharing your pain (and following this thread) for some time and can finally share what we feel is the most complete standard-to-Boost solution yet.

    Essentially what's been called "Option B", the Lindarets Boostinator is a hub-specific kit that replaces existing hub end caps with longer versions and, in the case of rear models, adds a rotor spacer and set of high-strength bolts. Once installed, all parts remain with the hub and wheel dish is reduced.

    While a dedicated hub will always be the ideal solution, not everyone wants or needs to replace everything at once. We're open to more models than are shown on the website now (and have a number designed)- just let us know if there's anything in particular you'd be interested and we'll see if we can get the quantities to make it work. Thanks!

    Marc
    It's great there are companies like this bringing product to us that solves the problems created by the "industry" to make something marginally better if anything.

    Thank you Marc, I just checked out your website. Great philosophy!

    Lindarets

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Cuz View Post
    That's a nice kit Marc. It's now opened up the option of secondhand wheels for my boost frame.
    If it's anything like the 26-to-27.5 shift, you'll be spoiled for choice of high-end wheelsets before long

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    It's great there are companies like this bringing product to us that solves the problems created by the "industry" to make something marginally better if anything.

    Thank you Marc, I just checked out your website. Great philosophy!

    Lindarets
    BluePitch,

    Thanks! Seeing as we have control in this case, we're trying to do business in a way that we can be excited about. Thanks to all of you guys for your enthusiasm and making it possible.

    Marc

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    @marc lindarets great idea! I did not get a detail: shall I re-dish the rear wheel if i want to use your spacers? Thank you in advance!

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    Quote Originally Posted by whattis View Post
    @marc lindarets great idea! I did not get a detail: shall I re-dish the rear wheel if i want to use your spacers? Thank you in advance!
    Whattis,

    Thanks! Yes- you will have to de-dish your wheel slightly. That's the approach that yields the best cassette and rotor position and has a (admittedly small) benefit to spoke balance. Details and instructions are at lindarets.com.

  92. #92
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    The new 148 standard seemed well aimed at selling new wheelsets and hubs. These adapters might throw a wrench in their master plan.

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    Lindarets,

    Any chance you guys will offer two 3mm end caps vs one NDS 6mm end cap? (and for I9 hubs?) I have a non boost wheel set AND crank, so I want to keep everything centered so my chainline is ok with my non boost crank. I'd rather do a proper end cap vs just the washers.

    -Tom

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    Vote for I9 hubs. Would prefer a setup that doesn't require a re-dish as I'm planning to be stuck with a boost and non-boost bike. Would like to swap wheels between bikes quickly depending on conditions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by trhoppe View Post
    Lindarets,

    Any chance you guys will offer two 3mm end caps vs one NDS 6mm end cap? (and for I9 hubs?) I have a non boost wheel set AND crank, so I want to keep everything centered so my chainline is ok with my non boost crank. I'd rather do a proper end cap vs just the washers.

    -Tom
    Tom,
    I'm afraid not- in addition to being more expensive adding space on both sides messes with shift geometry while reducing chain:tire clearance and making single 'ring chainlines worse- so it's a route we've chosen not to take.

    If you're on a single chainring, have a look at Wolf Tooth's article on chainline for Boost- there's a good chance that your existing chainring will already provide a near-ideal Boost chainline. I know that it's not the answer that you were hoping for- but it's the one that we strongly feel will provide the best overall performance.

    Marc

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenblur View Post
    Vote for I9 hubs. Would prefer a setup that doesn't require a re-dish as I'm planning to be stuck with a boost and non-boost bike. Would like to swap wheels between bikes quickly depending on conditions.
    I9 hubs are next on our list! As soon as the Hopes clear the shop, we'll be cutting and testing prototypes. As far as a centered kit goes, have a look at my response to Tom above.

    Your situation is a little different with the desire to swap, but in that case it would be easy to de-dish by 1.5mm (rather than 3mm) so that the wheel is ever-so-slightly to the left on the 142mm bike and to the right on the 148mm bike. That solution wouldn't be perfect on paper, but is well within normal frame, wheel, and tire tolerances- you should have plenty of room if you're not already pushing the limits of your frames' tire clearances.

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    Perhaps this has been discussed already, but has anyone been planning on introducing 3rd party torque caps for front hubs to fit the new Rockshox offerings. I see I9 makes them for their own hubs, but my new Project 321 boost hubs are getting no love currently.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by oaklandish View Post
    Perhaps this has been discussed already, but has anyone been planning on introducing 3rd party torque caps for front hubs to fit the new Rockshox offerings...
    Are you referring to Boost or Predictive Steering (RS1) forks? While the nominal dimensions are the same, Predictive Steering hubs are a different beast from Boost.

    Where some 15x100mm and 15x110mm hubs use the thru axle as the axle (the bearings resting directly on the TA) and others have a ~20mm sleeve axle, PS hubs have true axles that are in the neighborhood of 27mm in diameter- the TA just acts as a skewer. This makes the hubs a whole lot stiffer (and heavier)- which is needed to tie the independent legs together. But it effectively rules out an end cap swap as a solution.

    Marc

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Lindarets View Post
    Where some 15x100mm and 15x110mm hubs use the thru axle as the axle (the bearings resting directly on the TA) and others have a ~20mm sleeve axle, PS hubs have true axles that are in the neighborhood of 27mm in diameter- the TA just acts as a skewer. This makes the hubs a whole lot stiffer (and heavier)- which is needed to tie the independent legs together. But it effectively rules out an end cap swap as a solution.

    Marc
    Not PS, but for some of the new pike and lyric forks (not sure if all of them) SRAM have milled out the fork ends to 31mm diameter from the standard size. SRAM is calling it a torque cap. This means hubs will need much bigger caps with more surface area to benefit from the fork changes. When I install my Project 321 Boost front hub into my new Boost Pike I have to center the hub before the thru axle can be installed. It's definitely an inconvenience, but I also suspect the fact that the hub caps are not nestled into the fork any longer that stiffness would be decreased.

    Here is the link to the I9 part:
    Industry Nine - 15mm Torque Cap Kit

    Here are some pictures from the internets showing the change that Rockshox is implementing:
    Boost 148 adapters-max_lyrik3x1_696156.jpg

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  100. #100
    Goat Wrangler
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    Aah- got it. Specialized tried to do something similar with the introduction of 28mm QR end caps several years back. Thanks for bringing this up- we don't have any immediate plans, but if it catches on (and proves beneficial) then it's certainly something that we could do.

    Marc

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