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Thread: Best hub grease

  1. #1
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    Best hub grease

    What is the best grease to use in a Shimano hub? I have repacked hubs with 1) Triflow teflon fortified grease, which is too thick but holds up well. 2) 20 year old Schwinn red grease and 3) white lithium grease which seems to break down quickly on long rides. How well does Finish line, Phil Woods and Park Tools general purpose bicycle greases work in hub bearings and races?

  2. #2
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    I've been using the Park on my hubs and it seems to work fine.

  3. #3
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    Phil Wood and Park grease are both far superior to any White Lithium grease in water resistance. But you can save a few $$ by simply buying Marine or Waterproof grease from a boating or moto shop (I use Bel-Ray Waterproof myself and it works just as good as the Phil Wood or Park for less IME).

    I've been testing a Soy based grease in one of my wheelsets but don't have enough time on them to recommend it at this point.

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    Who makes the soy based grease? My LBS now carries soy based Triflow oil, which I want to try on my chain. Hopefully the soy oil is better then 3 in 1 oil as a chain lubricant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bwalton
    Who makes the soy based grease? My LBS now carries soy based Triflow oil, which I want to try on my chain. Hopefully the soy oil is better then 3 in 1 oil as a chain lubricant.
    Well it is nice to see another manufacturer use a biodegradable formula, though Tri-Flow still uses Teflon (PTFE) which is 100% NOT biodegradable and very harmful to our feathered friends. Still, it is a step in the right direction. You might check out Pedros Chainj or Ernesto Lube for a Teflon free formula (or visit my blog for a DIY formula using Bio based bar and chain oil).

    The grease is LubriMatic Green LMX "Red" Grease...paid $5 for a tub of it. It's a lithium complex (more water resistant than just white lithium) based grease. I'm trying it on my POS Quando hubs because I don't care if they die. I ran all last winter with Phil Wood in them and they held up despite my efforts to kill them. So this winter they have been on the Soy Grease, I'll open them up after it dries out around here and see how things look. If they look as good as they did on the Phil Wood grease...I'll feel comfortable recommending it.

  6. #6
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    mtnbiker72, have you tried the LubriMatic Chain Saw Bar oil or general purpose oil on your chain yet? If so, how did it perform? I read somewhere that Olive oil works very well on Bicycle chains-however I have never tried it.

  7. #7
    yelgatgab
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    DuMonde Tech has a "green" chain lube that I've been using since last year. It doesn't last quite as long as the conventional DuMonde stuff, but it's still better chain lube than most stuff I've tried.

    Pricey, though. And, it's probably just some repackaged LubriMatic bar oil.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwalton
    mtnbiker72, have you tried the LubriMatic Chain Saw Bar oil or general purpose oil on your chain yet? If so, how did it perform? I read somewhere that Olive oil works very well on Bicycle chains-however I have never tried it.
    I am using Renewable Lubricants 15w-50 Bar and Chain Oil which is Canola based. It is very viscous so I cut it 1:1 with strait Canola Oil. I have been using this since December riding in the wet PNW winter and it holds up as well as any wet lube I have used over the 18 years I have been mountain biking. I also had a group of friends take it down to the 24 hours of Old Pueblo this winter and came back with positive results (did not attract sand and dust when applied correctly).

    Strait Canola, Vegetable (Soy), or Olive oil will lubricate but lacks tackifiers and pressure additives so your likely to use a lot of it and make quite a mess.

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    I like this thread.....especially the guys that come out and say - riding for 18 years - and here is what works. This info is valuable!!!

    I thought I was being smart by using the white lithium grease....BUT, as already mentioned, it creates a mess and it breaks down quickly in ball bearing hubs.

    I think the white lithium gease is good for performance. Whenever I clean and repack a hub the wheel spins better - but that could be just because it has been cleaned and re-packed!?!?!?

    Anyway, I will be ordering some waterproof gease, and for the chain I will try some bio-cooking oils as mentioned.

    HOWEVER, can everyone comment in on sealed bearings? This is an area that interests me. Here is why:

    1) seals cause fiction.
    2) oil inside the bearings reduces fiction.
    3) no seals kills bearings.
    4) fiction causes rolling resistance.


    Has anyone got a magic setup? I have played with sealed bearings alittle, mostly just replacing the stock bearings with enduro ceramic bearings. I did a trick on my Bontrager wheels that got me excited. Took the hubs (DTswiss) apart and checked the bearings, all were smooth and functioning pefectly well. Noticed that the inside seal was grey in color, and the outside seal was black. Removed the black seal, flipped the grey seal to the outside - removed the rubber washer type seal, put everything back together and this wheel spins almost as effortless as the enduro bearings - almost!

    Of course I realized this is now a 'higher' maintainance hub setup....but wow, the performance gain is real. NB: I also repacked the bearings with the white lithium gease.

    I am going to give these wheels about 6 DRY WEATHER rides - with no water hose cleanings, and see whats inside. This is interesting stuff for me....anyone else try these types of mods??

    ...LC(cheers)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by twenty6black
    I like this thread.....especially the guys that come out and say - riding for 18 years - and here is what works. This info is valuable!!!

    I thought I was being smart by using the white lithium grease....BUT, as already mentioned, it creates a mess and it breaks down quickly in ball bearing hubs.

    I think the white lithium gease is good for performance. Whenever I clean and repack a hub the wheel spins better - but that could be just because it has been cleaned and re-packed!?!?!?

    Anyway, I will be ordering some waterproof gease, and for the chain I will try some bio-cooking oils as mentioned.

    HOWEVER, can everyone comment in on sealed bearings? This is an area that interests me. Here is why:

    1) seals cause fiction.
    2) oil inside the bearings reduces fiction.
    3) no seals kills bearings.
    4) fiction causes rolling resistance.


    Has anyone got a magic setup? I have played with sealed bearings alittle, mostly just replacing the stock bearings with enduro ceramic bearings. I did a trick on my Bontrager wheels that got me excited. Took the hubs (DTswiss) apart and checked the bearings, all were smooth and functioning pefectly well. Noticed that the inside seal was grey in color, and the outside seal was black. Removed the black seal, flipped the grey seal to the outside - removed the rubber washer type seal, put everything back together and this wheel spins almost as effortless as the enduro bearings - almost!

    Of course I realized this is now a 'higher' maintainance hub setup....but wow, the performance gain is real. NB: I also repacked the bearings with the white lithium gease.

    I am going to give these wheels about 6 DRY WEATHER rides - with no water hose cleanings, and see whats inside. This is interesting stuff for me....anyone else try these types of mods??

    ...LC(cheers)
    not sure which you were talking about, but do remember that the true test of a bearing is how it performs under full load not just in a stand. Removing a seal will certainly have some effect, but in real world performance under load it might not be much

    Put your car up on a lift and spin the wheel and you might be surprised that it manages to drive well at all because of how poorly they spin

    I will never use that lithium junk again for mechanical purposes. Breaks down terribly, as noted already. I think you are correct that the difference you see is just because of fresh grease.

    Personally I don't mind a little seal drag in return for highly reliable and low maintenance bearings. Saves me time and money and lets me ride more and wrench less

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by twenty6black
    Has anyone got a magic setup? I have played with sealed bearings alittle, mostly just replacing the stock bearings with enduro ceramic bearings. I did a trick on my Bontrager wheels that got me excited. Took the hubs (DTswiss) apart and checked the bearings, all were smooth and functioning pefectly well. Noticed that the inside seal was grey in color, and the outside seal was black. Removed the black seal, flipped the grey seal to the outside - removed the rubber washer type seal, put everything back together and this wheel spins almost as effortless as the enduro bearings - almost!

    Of course I realized this is now a 'higher' maintainance hub setup....but wow, the performance gain is real. NB: I also repacked the bearings with the white lithium gease.

    I am going to give these wheels about 6 DRY WEATHER rides - with no water hose cleanings, and see whats inside. This is interesting stuff for me....anyone else try these types of mods??

    ...LC(cheers)
    If you want the lowest friction grease, check out Slickoleum (also known as Slick Honey). I use it on my road bike Ultegra hubs and the lack of rolling resistance is impressive. I just haven't ever had full faith in it on my mountain bikes due to the amount of mud, water, washing, and general abuse my hubs take.

  12. #12
    Hazzah!
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    blue marine grease...waterproof and cheap, available just about everywhere.

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