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Thread: Best front tire

  1. #1
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    Best front tire

    I am an aggressive AM rider stuck on XC trails. My current front tire feels sketchy to me especially at full lean. I'm looking for a front tire that would provide great stability in deep cornering and under load while still maintaining a decently low rolling resistance, and weight. Any suggestions for a front tire specifically. I currently run ghetto tubeless, 26", 2.1-2.3 tires. Trail conditions are a mix of hard pack, rock gardens, and the occasional tree roots.

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    What are you running now? What width rim?

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    Currently I have specialized resolutions 26x2.0 mounted to DT Swiss x430 rims, not sure of the rim width of the top of my head. I have Stan's ZTR Arch Ex's in the mail that should be here any day now. The tire worked fine on my hardtail but now that I can carry more speed and I feel like I have a bit of a safety net with the FS I'm clearing the table top instead of merely hitting it. My riding has improved and I feel like I'm exceeding the tires capabilities and feel like it just wants to wash out in corners.

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    The arch will support a bigger tire better than your current rims.

    I dont have experience with that tire, but it looks small and the tread pattern doesnt seem like it would catch well. I think you could do better with most modern popular tires out there, in ~2.35. Most people seem to love the conti trail king/rubber queens. I thought the new rampage SC 2.35 was incredible. WTB and schwable have some great stuff out these days.

    Be aware that not all tires work with stans rims... many just flat out dont fit, many compromise the rim (bead way way too tight). Whatever you choose, do some searching to see what kind of luck people have with them specifically on stans rims. Its a good idea to not use any UST or tubeless ready tire on stans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    The arch will support a bigger tire better than your current rims.

    I dont have experience with that tire, but it looks small and the tread pattern doesnt seem like it would catch well. I think you could do better with most modern popular tires out there, in ~2.35. Most people seem to love the conti trail king/rubber queens. I thought the new rampage SC 2.35 was incredible. WTB and schwable have some great stuff out these days.

    Be aware that not all tires work with stans rims... many just flat out dont fit, many compromise the rim (bead way way too tight). Whatever you choose, do some searching to see what kind of luck people have with them specifically on stans rims. Its a good idea to not use any UST or tubeless ready tire on stans.
    Thanks One Pivot, i appreciate the info! Ive been researching and reading up but there are just SOOO many choices of tires! I wish manufacturers would make them like motorcycle tires where the front tread is specific for the front and back tread specific for the back, it would make things much easier IMO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by h20-50 View Post
    Thanks One Pivot, i appreciate the info! Ive been researching and reading up but there are just SOOO many choices of tires! I wish manufacturers would make them like motorcycle tires where the front tread is specific for the front and back tread specific for the back, it would make things much easier IMO.
    Some companies do (Maxxis?) but the rest of us just have to cut and try. My favorite damp/cold front tire is Panaracer Rampage, but when it gets dry and gravelly, the WTB Exiwolf is great. My favorite rear no matter what is still the Continental X king.

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    Quote Originally Posted by h20-50 View Post
    I am an aggressive AM rider stuck on XC trails. My current front tire feels sketchy to me especially at full lean. I'm looking for a front tire that would provide great stability in deep cornering and under load while still maintaining a decently low rolling resistance, and weight. Any suggestions for a front tire specifically. I currently run ghetto tubeless, 26", 2.1-2.3 tires. Trail conditions are a mix of hard pack, rock gardens, and the occasional tree roots.
    OP-

    You're not going to get ANYTHING better than a trail king 2.4, apex compound front.

    You are also going to be able to kill it with the Schwalby Muddy Mary trail star front.
    Ride it like you won't get another chance.

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    another light-ish tire with very good rolling and cornering grip is the Schwalbe Nobby Nic.

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    Having ridden 15+ different tires in the last 12 month my choice is the Hans Dampf up front. The Conti Mountain King or Trail King are a close second. The HD is very predictable in every condition I have ridden from desert rocks to mud. It also has a tremendous amount of grip, but ultimately there may be a few tires with even more. The issue with those tires is that they were less predictable when pushed and so I did not push them as hard consistently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by apvkt View Post
    Hi,
    I agree with this because i came to know that Schwalbe Nobby Nic is very light and it has several benefits..It is suitable for any kind of climatic conditions.
    I think this is the direction I am leaning, or the HD, just so damn expensive! I've read nothing but great things about them. What kinda life do you see out of them? For $80 they should mount and inflate themselves!!

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    I have around 500 miles on my HD up front. Do not try to run them on the rear unless you go Pacestar or harder. It was not my favorite rear tire. You can get the HD's from Bikebling for $69 and you usually get 10% off for IMBA membership. If you are concerned about cost go with the Conti tires. Bling has those for $49 in Black Chili compound/made in Germany which seems to last forever.

    I am not a huge Nobby Nic fan. I thought it wandered too much on the loose over hardpack that is everywhere in Socal.

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    Don't forget to look at some other things. You mentioned you are on a new ride, so ensure that the front suspension is set up properly. If it dives too much that will affect steering geometry and the sudden change can make the tire exceed traction levels. Ensure sag is set, compression is not too stiff/soft and rebound is not too slow (can cause packing) and since its FS-the rear can affect the front.

    Also, a lot of people find that riding style needs to be adjusted a little from HT to FS (or 26 to 29 etc). Even the same style/size bike in a different brand or model can make that necessary. For example- When I switched from a RIG SS to Vassago SS (both HT 29) I noticed to rail the same turn at the same speed, I had to adjust my body position, in this case leaning back and using my hips/feet to help steer.

    The tires can always help, but I only add this because it can get frustrating and expensive chasing down an issue. I like to start with the free stuff first!
    Find a ride on FB> AZ MTB

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  13. #13
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    I just want to give a nod to the newish Michelin Wild Grip'r II advanced technology. the 2.25 is a full 2.25" on 19mm internal rims. Is very grippy in leaves, pinestraw, loam, and loose over hardpack. It rolls fairly fast and is light for it's size. It seems to be fairly tough too. No threads showing after numerous miles through rocks, unlike many other tires I have ridden. Oh, and it's pretty cheap too. What else would you need in a XC/Trail tire. I'm 210 lbs on a Giant Trance X and use all the travel.
    I've got a bike
    You can ride it if you like
    It's got a basket, a bell that rings
    and things to make it look good . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by h20-50 View Post
    I think this is the direction I am leaning, or the HD, just so damn expensive! I've read nothing but great things about them. What kinda life do you see out of them? For $80 they should mount and inflate themselves!!
    Starbike.com sells them a lot cheaper. They minus 19% off the price you see if you live out side of Germany. For example 4 Hans Dampf with shipping would cost $210 shipped to your door. So $52.50 a tire

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    I'd recommend the Specialized/S-Works Purgatory. It's a 2.3 tire

  16. #16
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    Schwalbe Nobby Nic.

  17. #17
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    I've been running the Specialized Butcher Control 2.3 up front and I'm very happy with it. They classify it as a freeride/DH tire, but it's a really good trail or all-mountain tire. Good price, 2Bliss ready, good compromise between beefiness and weight (730 g).

    Lee Likes Bikes reviewed it: Lee Likes Bikes

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