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  1. #1
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    Am I able to go Tubeless?

    I am recently getting back into riding after getting busy with life and picked up a Trek Stache 7 that was only ridden 3 times until the previous owner decided to go to a FS. I have been trying to study up on the tubeless route since I have been pushing my limits on my air pressure and gotten to a point that I blew two tubes on our last single track outing.

    So first question, since the tubeless option wasn't popular back when I got into riding, is:
    Is going Tubeless really worth it for an average rider that rides single track 2-3 times a week?

    And second question:
    Are the current wheels on my bike able to be converted to tubeless?

    Here is the link to my spec page:
    Trek Bicycle

    Which states, "w/Bontrager Duster 28-hole Tubeless Ready rims"
    So am I able to go Tubeless without doing it in a cheap, hack kind of way?

    Thank you in advance for all of your help and knowledge!

  2. #2
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    Okay, I am still unable to find any definite answer on this through Trek so if someone here could possibly point me in the right direction or point me to a thread that I missed that may explain an answer I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks

  3. #3
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    A quick Google search turned up a lot of hits and videos. Start here:
    Duster tubeless questions

    So it seems the answer is yes to both.

    If you ride once a week or more I'd think tubeless is worth it. Really the only drawback is upfront cost for materials and then periodic maintenance (adding fluid and cleaning). Especially if you live in areas with thorns or goatheads.

  4. #4
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    Forgot the other link.
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  5. #5
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    Tubeless is definitely worth it. You just need a few things to make the change, your rims work with a special rim strip that makes them tubeless. You should be able to get the strips from any decent Trek dealer, I have a set on one of my bikes and it is a simple system, the rim strip is a semi-rigid formed plastic strip that fits into the rim and creates a good seal with the tires, it is simpler than using tape to seal the rim. You will also need tubeless valve stems and some sealant. Your current tires will probably work, but you may not know for sure until you try, the stock tires are probably not tubeless ready but that doesn't mean they won't work.

  6. #6
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    Yep, go for it. If you've pinch flatted, you'll appreciate tubeless.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by F8L View Post
    A quick Google search turned up a lot of hits and videos. Start here:
    Duster tubeless questions

    So it seems the answer is yes to both.

    If you ride once a week or more I'd think tubeless is worth it. Really the only drawback is upfront cost for materials and then periodic maintenance (adding fluid and cleaning). Especially if you live in areas with thorns or goatheads.
    Thank you very much for the info, the videos are spot on.

    Quote Originally Posted by VonFalkenhausen View Post
    Tubeless is definitely worth it. You just need a few things to make the change, your rims work with a special rim strip that makes them tubeless. You should be able to get the strips from any decent Trek dealer, I have a set on one of my bikes and it is a simple system, the rim strip is a semi-rigid formed plastic strip that fits into the rim and creates a good seal with the tires, it is simpler than using tape to seal the rim. You will also need tubeless valve stems and some sealant. Your current tires will probably work, but you may not know for sure until you try, the stock tires are probably not tubeless ready but that doesn't mean they won't work.
    Thank you also for your help, I guess all I have to do is to start spending money now!

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