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  1. #1
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    About to buy a compressor to go tubeless

    The only thing I really need it for is tubeless seating of tires. I already have power tools that satisfy my every other need.


    I'm debating between the Makita MAC700 (2.6gallon) @ $200 and a Husky 8 gallon @ $130. ALL of my power tools are Makita, DeWalt, Echo, etc. so it makes it hard for me to stomach an off brand like Husky, even though its 2/3 the price and 3x the capacity.


    The reading I've done would indicate that you really need 20-30+ gallons to use impact wrenches and stuff like it. So from that perspective the 8 gallon doesn't even have the benefit of "if I get it then I have access to more tools in the future" and it becomes about price.


    Before anyone suggests other methods of seating tubeless tires, I'll gladly pay for convenience/ease. They're both cheap enough I don't want to mess with other methods.

  2. #2
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
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    Husky is good stuff, man. They are the Honda of Europe.

    TIP: Tube the tire first, and inflate to 80psi overnight. Remove tube, add goop and once the beads stretch, you will be able to re-seat them with a floor pump. Wait for the two audible "pops" and you're done!
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    Husky is good stuff, man. They are the Honda of Europe....
    It got a 4 star cumulative review on the HD website... Just kind of hesitant.

  4. #4
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    Always go for more volume. I use air tools with my 8 gal version - rivet gun especially. Now if you're using a cut off tool, then yeah, you need 30 gal but don't discount the use of tools with an 8 gal!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    Always go for more volume. I use air tools with my 8 gal version - rivet gun especially. Now if you're using a cut off tool, then yeah, you need 30 gal but don't discount the use of tools with an 8 gal!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    The only tool I can see myself using is a impact wrench. Can 8 gallons run one of those? For car lug nuts and such?

    I just don't want to buy a cheap tool and have issues with it

  6. #6
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    If you don't want to spend a lot of money, I did it with one of those small car compressors for fixing flats (good to keep in your car anyway). $20 at Walmart. I did have to buy a $2 Presta > Schrader valve converter from my LBS to use it though.

    What was nice is that it supplies constant pressure (but not super high so you can't risk blowing the tire off the rim) while you work/massage the bead out with your hands.

  7. #7
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    Air compressor is great for drying the small moving parts of your bike after a wash. More volume = better. I got a small one and regret it everytime I have to wait through several recharge cycles to get the components on my bike properly dried.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelhmr View Post
    Air compressor is great for drying the small moving parts of your bike after a wash. More volume = better. I got a small one and regret it everytime I have to wait through several recharge cycles to get the components on my bike properly dried.
    How small of one did you get?

  9. #9
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    Both the Makita 700 and Home Depot compressor are good choices as both are oil lubricated. Whatever you do, don't buy a pancake or oil free compressor, they are extremely loud and have a short life.

    The Makita is a better compressor in that it is of the newer generation that uses a pump that runs at half the speed of older pumps. The advantages it provides are lower sound levels and less heat, which in turn equates to a longer life. That said if the noise issue is not a concern to you (normal compressors are pretty loud, pancake compressors are simply obnoxious), for light household use either the Husky or Makita should last you well beyond 10 years and likely in the 20-30 year range.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDMC View Post
    Both the Makita 700 and Home Depot compressor are good choices as both are oil lubricated. Whatever you do, don't buy a pancake or oil free compressor, they are extremely loud and have a short life.

    The Makita is a better compressor in that it is of the newer generation that uses a pump that runs at half the speed of older pumps. The advantages it provides are lower sound levels and less heat, which in turn equates to a longer life. That said if the noise issue is not a concern to you (normal compressors are pretty loud, pancake compressors are simply obnoxious), for light household use either the Husky or Makita should last you well beyond 10 years and likely in the 20-30 year range.
    Thanks.

    Home Depot stocks the husky and the Makita is special order so I could probably get them to price match a 20% off harbor freight coupon if I got that one

  11. #11
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    You said the only thing you need it for is seating tubeless bike tires. Based on that (if you want to run air tools like an impact wrench, die grinder, etc. then buy a BIG one for that), you don't need much of an air compressor or tank. I bought a 1 hp - 8 gallon Craftsman model in 1993, and it is still working just great for what use it for (small painting projects, air nozzle to clean or dry, and inflating all sorts of tires.

    Works great for tubeless bike tires. The biggest thing I would recommend for doing that is to use a ball foot chuck instead of those big gas station style chucks that really don't flow as much air. And if you need even more air flow, you can remove the valve core on the wheel, and use an air gun with a rubber tip. Every tubeless tire I have tried has succumbed to one method or another, and the great majority need nothing more than the ball foot chuck and a presta to schraeder adapter.

    Many, can be done with a decent floor pump, but the compressor makes quick easy work of it.

    TIP: If using a presta to schraeder adapter, make sure the valve core is snugly threaded into the valve stem, and then just screw the adapter on barely far enough so the o-ring will seal. This will keep the adapter from unthreading the valve core along with the adapter.

  12. #12
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    About to buy a compressor to go tubeless

    Quote Originally Posted by CDMC View Post
    Both the Makita 700 and Home Depot compressor are good choices as both are oil lubricated. Whatever you do, don't buy a pancake or oil free compressor, they are extremely loud and have a short life.

    The Makita is a better compressor in that it is of the newer generation that uses a pump that runs at half the speed of older pumps. The advantages it provides are lower sound levels and less heat, which in turn equates to a longer life. That said if the noise issue is not a concern to you (normal compressors are pretty loud, pancake compressors are simply obnoxious), for light household use either the Husky or Makita should last you well beyond 10 years and likely in the 20-30 year range.
    Owning a cheap pancake bought on eBay, I couldn't agree more. Every time I run it, the wife and the cats go nuts.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  13. #13
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    I had a husky pancake and it was horribly loud and it lasted about 3 years. I have a makita oil lubricated now and couldn't be happier. Its super quiet in comparison.
    NEMBA Freetown VP

  14. #14
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    Besides tank volume there is also CFM and tank pressure. It's all going to depend in your application what will work best, but a smaller tank might not be a bad thing if it is at 200 psi vs. 125 and has a higher CFM rating.

  15. #15
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    I've got a 33 gallon craftsmen that's still not big enough.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    I've got a 33 gallon craftsmen that's still not big enough.
    For what purpose?

    I got the 8 gallon Husky and haven't used it for anything but break-in yet. I'm sure it will be fine for my purposes.

  17. #17
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    My industrial air tools apparently require an industrial cimpresor. My top cat angle grinder uses ~12cfm. The biggest single phase compressor would just barley be big enough. The reason I brought it up is, you won't regret getting big compressor, you will regret getting a small one.

  18. #18
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    About to buy a compressor to go tubeless

    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    My industrial air tools apparently require an industrial cimpresor. My top cat angle grinder uses ~12cfm. The biggest single phase compressor would just barley be big enough. The reason I brought it up is, you won't regret getting big compressor, you will regret getting a small one.
    I like my small compressor. But then again, if I need a big one, my next door neighbor has a 140cfm gas powered compressor that will power any tool you can think of. It was made to run two jackhammers at a time.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  19. #19
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    I have one of these cheep Harbor Freight compressors. Adding an air hose and proper fittings for schrader or presta removable valve cores, it works great for mountain bike tubeless air up. Many tires can be mounted tubeless before restarting the electric compressor to refill the air tank in a couple minutes.

    It's too weak and small volume for any heavy duty power tool uses. But is pretty small, light, and easy to carry around when your car tires need more pressure too.

    Pancake Air Compressor - 3 Gallon, 100 PSI
    I bought this Harbor Freight starter kit to0:
    20 Piece Air Compressor Starter Kit
    And already had one of these:
    Presta Air Compressor Bicycle Inflator, fits both Presta and Schrader - Prestaflator.com
    Or use one of these with the hand valve that comes with the Harbor Freight starter kit:
    Amazon.com: Presta Adapter: Sports & Outdoors
    Looks like the coupons found sometimes in magazines for this compressor can be got from ebay sellers too:
    Harbor Freight Coupon - 3 Gallon, 100 PSI Oilless Pancake Air Compressor Save$40 on eBay!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDMC View Post
    Both the Makita 700 and Home Depot compressor are good choices as both are oil lubricated. Whatever you do, don't buy a pancake or oil free compressor, they are extremely loud and have a short life.

    The Makita is a better compressor in that it is of the newer generation that uses a pump that runs at half the speed of older pumps. The advantages it provides are lower sound levels and less heat, which in turn equates to a longer life. That said if the noise issue is not a concern to you (normal compressors are pretty loud, pancake compressors are simply obnoxious), for light household use either the Husky or Makita should last you well beyond 10 years and likely in the 20-30 year range.
    I have a Porter Cable pancake 2.0 gal that works well for my needs. I don't want to say it's loud.....................nevermind, it is real loud. If it did not come with the nail guns I needed at the time, I would not have bought it.

    If I were to replace mine today, I'd be getting the Husky.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    My industrial air tools apparently require an industrial cimpresor. My top cat angle grinder uses ~12cfm. The biggest single phase compressor would just barley be big enough. The reason I brought it up is, you won't regret getting big compressor, you will regret getting a small one.
    This. Impact guns aren't too bad. I have a 30 gal 5 hp. But die grinders and the like require intermittant usage. If you want a compressor for general usage, get as big as you can afford.

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