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  1. #1
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    2Bliss Ready Valve Stem - any good?

    Just taken delivery of my new Stumpjumper Hardtail; job one is to get some winter tires on. I chose Specialise Purgatory for the front, and Ground Control at the back, both 2Bliss Ready. The Roval wheels have 2Bliss Ready rim tape inside, and Specialized 2Bliss Ready Valve Stems came with the bike, and the dealer told me I was ready to go tubeless. With everything "Specialized" and recommended to work together, it should be easy.

    Trouble is, I can't get the valve stems to seal. I have only use DT Swiss and Scott tubless conversions in the past, and had no trouble over many years BUT - are these specialized valve stems any good? Or is there some magic trick I have missed? I have checked the instructions in http://www.specialized.com/media/wha...G0290_revA.pdf and verified the valve stems are correctly orierntated. But they slowly leak air: tire inflates and sseems to seal OK but overnight it is soft and under water I can see air bubbling slowly from around the valve stem. I am using Stans btw

    Anyone else have good or bad experience with these parts?.

  2. #2
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    put a dab of sealant (silicone caulk or liquid latex or something) around the base of the valve before you install it and snug up the nut well.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  3. #3
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    That thought had crossed my mind too but I do want to retain the ability to put a tube in if I puncture on the trail and stans - or my sticky string repairs - won't fix it.
    Last resort, might do it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by StumpjumperUK View Post
    That thought had crossed my mind too but I do want to retain the ability to put a tube in if I puncture on the trail and stans - or my sticky string repairs - won't fix it.
    Last resort, might do it.
    liquid latex won't prevent you from pulling the valve and putting a tube in.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  5. #5
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    Some people have also had luck with fitting an o-ring around the valve stem before inserting it into the rim.

    Otherwise, try tightening the locknut on the stem more. They can be difficult to get tight enough to provide a decent seal.

  6. #6
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    When my Rovals were new my valve stems leaked a bit, too. I needed to tighten the removable cores a bit. I think I remember having to crank down the stem nuts, too. They've been flawless ever since.

    Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk 2

  7. #7
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    Don't think the probvem is the cores since the air bubbles out around the stem - just by the nut. I might need to try the O-Rings since I did try tightening up the nuts quite a lot - using pliers. And it still leaked a little. Preferably, since I don't always carry pliers, I only want to tighten these up by hand so I can get them out if needed on the trail, so even this would not be a good solution for me.

    Personally I have alway msanaged to get my current (DT-Swiss) tubeless setup sealed on the trail without having to use a tube - but I have watched some of my tubeless mates struggle and end up putting in a tube. So I prefer to keep that option open.

  8. #8
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    You're right, the nut should only have to be finger tight.
    Did you try using the sealant itself to stop the leaking? Inflate the tire to riding pressure. Hold the tire vertically with the valve stem at 6 o'clock. Let the sealant pool to the lowest point which will be directly under the valve stem. Then shake up and down so the sealant splashes up against the valve stem. The escaping air should push sealant into the leaking areas and plug them up. That has worked for me before with stubborn leaking valves.
    Last edited by ewarnerusa; 01-21-2013 at 08:50 AM.

  9. #9
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    Probably will try again following your suggestion. But first I need to buy a bit more Stans because most of mine is all over the floor after taking the tyre off and on too often!

    Loads of snow still around in this part of the world so not quite in a rush yet...

  10. #10
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    Just to close the loop on this one...
    Tried a new stem with new Stans on the back and it all sealed immediately, and perfectly, Put the "leaking" stem on the front with new Stans and it's better, but still loses a tiny bit of pressure each day.
    So I think the blame is mostly on that one stem, maybe made worse by using old Stans - there is no shelf-life marked but it was the end of a bottle that I've had 2-3 years.
    I'll change that Stem shortly, my friendly Spesh dealer (Berkshire Cycle Co ) already gave me another.

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