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  1. #1
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    29er HT, Still running tubes, need help on f/r tire combo

    So I picked up my first 29er this year, couple weeks back. 2012 SJ comp HT. I'm not an expert by any means but I feel like the tires it came with a more for hard packed dirt and probably racing, I say this because the nubs are very small and when I really try to carve in/out a turn or at a high speed it just doesnt feel like I want it too. They dont seem to bit into the trails I ride very well.

    *the trails I ride, mostly single track, few very steep hills and some nice down hills as well. Lots of rocks, roots and fun stuff to ride thru as well.

    I'm still running tubes, thought about tubeless but decided to stay running tubes. I dont race, theres not thorns or crap like that I have to deal with and I'm not really worried about the weight I save from it.

    So basically I'm looking for a really nice and grippy front tire with a nice grippy rear tire that isnt a terd. And when I say terd meaning doesnt roll very well. I've been reading a bunch of threads and I keep reading about Ardents, Aspens, RaRa (I think thats the name) and a few others. Any help suggestions or tips would be great!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    I have found the Maxxis Ignitor to be a good all around tire for rocks and roots (here in New England) and they roll pretty well. I use them on both my hardtail and FS 29ers, both tubed and tubeless. With tubes I run them around 30 psi (I weigh 195-200 lbs.).

  3. #3
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
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    What pressure are you running them at?

    That can really change how a tire behaves. I get up things on Renagades that dudes on Nevegals can't, because I'm running pressures that allow my tire to grip, instead of bounce off everything they come in contact with.

  4. #4
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    So I picked up my first 29er this year, couple weeks back. 2012 SJ comp HT. I'm not an expert by any means but I feel like the tires it came with a more for hard packed dirt and probably racing, I say this because the nubs are very small and when I really try to carve in/out a turn or at a high speed it just doesnt feel like I want it too. They dont seem to bit into the trails I ride very well.

    *the trails I ride, mostly single track, few very steep hills and some nice down hills as well. Lots of rocks, roots and fun stuff to ride thru as well.

    I'm still running tubes, thought about tubeless but decided to stay running tubes. I dont race, theres not thorns or crap like that I have to deal with and I'm not really worried about the weight I save from it.

    So basically I'm looking for a really nice and grippy front tire with a nice grippy rear tire that isnt a terd. And when I say terd meaning doesnt roll very well. I've been reading a bunch of threads and I keep reading about Ardents, Aspens, RaRa (I think thats the name) and a few others. Any help suggestions or tips would be great!
    Try a set of the Smorgasbords.
    Tires
    I designed them to be all-round most-conditions trail tires. Tough, grippy, high volume, durable ans inexpensive.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  5. #5
    Rep'n the 905
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    What pressure are you running them at?

    That can really change how a tire behaves. I get up things on Renagades that dudes on Nevegals can't, because I'm running pressures that allow my tire to grip, instead of bounce off everything they come in contact with.
    I just replaced a tube, and before that in all honesty I didnt check the pressure. Whatever the shop pumped it up at for me was what it stayed. Since I replaced the tube I pumped both f/r to 30psi. I have no idea if thats the right psi to ride on, I keep hearing it is from other people who were told by someone else.

  6. #6
    Perfectionist with ADHD!
    Reputation: ChewynMe's Avatar
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    I am not sure of your weight but let me say this: I was new to the 29er world back in February and I read through a bunch of old threads here and learned a ton of Shtuff! The lessons below we taught by all of the members on MTBR and I am greatful to have had them.

    I tried each of these steps out by riding the same/similar trails each during each experiment to keep as many of the vriables equal as possible.

    1. Before buying new rubber try alternating the pressures in your tires. Go as low as you can without hearing that bottom out sound when the rim contacts an obstacle. If you are 150-190 you should be able to run 30-35psi with most tires (if you keep running tubes). You can also go high on the pressure as well, but I would not exceed the max recommended for the tires you have.

    2. The lower the pressure you go the more tack/stick/grip you will have to your trails. It will make the tire slightly sluggish as you go lower so it is important to focus in on the feel from the change in pressure to dial it in just where you want it. The higher the pressure the less forgiveness you will have from the tread so you may washout more often, have less grip into your turns, but will roll smoother/faster.

    3. You will not always benefit from running identical pressures front and rear. The front tire will usually take a couple of extra psi while the rear will have a little less. (this may be a slight as 1-2psi or as great as 5-7psi difference depending on what makes you comfortable)

    4. If after adjusting the pressures up/down, and you find the "best" pressures but feel you still aren't getting enough from the tires, then look to some new rubber. (That selection process is tough, frustrating, but once you get it right it feels great)

    When I changed pressures, I did it 10psi at a time so I could really feel the change. It also helped me know if it was a change in the correct direction/ worng direction, or should I be in between the original and new pressure.

    I ended up with:

    2 WTB Stouts OE, I run these with tubes @ 40-45psi. They are usually on the rear and only used when I ride AM.

    WTB Bronson 2.2 (non-ust), w/ tube up front @ 42-45psi. Great reliability, a little heavy but rolls very fast.

    Maxxis Ignitor 2.1, non-exo version running it in the rear w/ tube @ 40psi for over 200 miles now. Great XC/AM hybrid, maybe a little short in the AM dept but my rides go back and forth so it has worked very well. Just switched it to the front w/o tube (even though this is a non-TCR/UST tire) and will start it out @ 50psi and work down from there.

    Kenda Slant 6 (R.I.P.), was a poor tire in quality and performance. Nothing to see here, move along....

    WTB Nano 2.1 TCS/UST, going to try this in the rear with the Ignitor. Will also run w/o tube and start @ 50psi and work down from there.

    Send me a PM if you have any questions, and for those that read this, if I have mixed anything up, or said something worng please correct me...my STML can kick in from time to time ;-)

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Try a set of the Smorgasbords.
    Tires
    I designed them to be all-round most-conditions trail tires. Tough, grippy, high volume, durable ans inexpensive.
    Shiggy, would you mind explaining the practical differences between the Enduro and the Trail Extreme in 29.
    -What does/do the different compounds mean to the rider?
    -Weight the same (I know every single tire fluctuates in weight, but should both these versions weigh roughly the same)?
    -Will the 2.4 version--chunky monkey--see the light of day, or are you out of that loop now?

    Thanks.

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    Shiggy, would you mind explaining the practical differences between the Enduro and the Trail Extreme in 29.
    -What does/do the different compounds mean to the rider?
    -Weight the same (I know every single tire fluctuates in weight, but should both these versions weigh roughly the same)?
    -Will the 2.4 version--chunky monkey--see the light of day, or are you out of that loop now?

    Thanks.
    The only difference is the Enduro is all 60A rubber and Trail Extreme is 60 in the middle and 42 on the edges. Little reason to go with the Enduro with the current pricing.

    The C Monk 2.4 should arrive soon.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

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