Page 16 of 36 FirstFirst ... 612131415161718192026 ... LastLast
Results 751 to 800 of 1796
  1. #751
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    119
    My old wheels were Stan's Arch (not the EX version)-DT-2.0-1.8-2.0 Comp spokes, Hadley hubs, 15mm front, 10mm thru rear. LB wheels are-wide AM rim, 2.0-1.7-2.0 wheelsmith spokes, DT Swiss 350 hubs, 15mm front, 10mm rear. So far, my old wheels are definitely better in the rough, i.e bombing down rough downhills. The LB carbon wheels are lighter, and they definitely allow the tires to hook up better, especially climbing.

  2. #752
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    400
    I just order my matte stronger DU rims i should see them in a few weeks! im excited to see if they hold up!

  3. #753
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    170
    Quote Originally Posted by rockinrod35 View Post
    My old wheels were Stan's Arch (not the EX version)-DT-2.0-1.8-2.0 Comp spokes, Hadley hubs, 15mm front, 10mm thru rear. LB wheels are-wide AM rim, 2.0-1.7-2.0 wheelsmith spokes, DT Swiss 350 hubs, 15mm front, 10mm rear. So far, my old wheels are definitely better in the rough, i.e bombing down rough downhills. The LB carbon wheels are lighter, and they definitely allow the tires to hook up better, especially climbing.
    I had the Arch rims just swapped everything over onto the carbon rims and the new rims make the wheels 100% better in all situations, so I would disagree with your findings. Just my opinion.

  4. #754
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    13

    Well, it was fun while it lasted...

    After about 5 weeks of riding, I was riding my favorite local trail and I rolled off a tiny jump (about a foot drop). I didn't notice the rock in the landing area until I hit it.

    The carbon rim didn't like handle the impact well.

    So sad, I really liked it until this happened. I'll be rebuilding with an alloy rim (Nancy says this is not covered by warranty).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26in chinese carbon all mountain rim-img_1111.jpg  


  5. #755
    knobby noob
    Reputation: axl886's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    94
    Just received from Nancy a day ago... 3k matte, hope it stands up to my usage.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26in chinese carbon all mountain rim-2012-11-14-11.22.03.jpg  

    26in chinese carbon all mountain rim-2012-11-14-11.22.45.jpg  

    26in chinese carbon all mountain rim-2012-11-14-11.23.05.jpg  


  6. #756
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gmats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,853
    Nice! I've been enjoying mine for several months now. I've used them through the rocky jungle riding we have here in Hawaii and even three weeks of CO single track trails. They've been wonderful. Hope they work as great for you as they have for me.

  7. #757
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    34
    just ordered a set to lace over to my I9's...fingers crossed...

  8. #758
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by dabe View Post
    After about 5 weeks of riding, I was riding my favorite local trail and I rolled off a tiny jump (about a foot drop). I didn't notice the rock in the landing area until I hit it.

    The carbon rim didn't like handle the impact well.

    So sad, I really liked it until this happened. I'll be rebuilding with an alloy rim (Nancy says this is not covered by warranty).
    Curious, did you pinch flat? Running tubeless? I've upped my pressure to avoid any chance of rock to rim contact.

  9. #759
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fix the Spade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,685
    Quote Originally Posted by dabe View Post
    I didn't notice the rock in the landing area until I hit it.
    Ouch, bad luck.

    I doubt an alloy rim would have handled the 'one sharp object on landing' scenario much better, but then again it doesn't hurt nearly as much to bust a $40 rim as a $150 carbon.

    Better luck with the replacement!

  10. #760
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hardboiled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    665
    Quote Originally Posted by dabe View Post
    After about 5 weeks of riding, I was riding my favorite local trail and I rolled off a tiny jump (about a foot drop). I didn't notice the rock in the landing area until I hit it.

    The carbon rim didn't like handle the impact well.

    So sad, I really liked it until this happened. I'll be rebuilding with an alloy rim (Nancy says this is not covered by warranty).
    bummer dude. out of curiosity, what did that rim weigh? curious if it was on the lighter or heavier/more reinforced end of the spectrum that they offer. thx.

  11. #761
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    13

    my broken rim

    Quote Originally Posted by hardboiled View Post
    bummer dude. out of curiosity, what did that rim weigh? curious if it was on the lighter or heavier/more reinforced end of the spectrum that they offer. thx.
    The rim weighed 384g.

    I was running tubeless. The impact broke the rim which caused the tire to leak down very quickly.

    I was running tubeless using gorilla tape with Continental Mountain King tires (version 1). I never had any trouble burping or getting the tires to seat.

    I was running 32 psi at the time of the failure.

    I agree that I might have damaged an alloy rim in same circumstances. We will never know for sure, since I promptly removed the rock.

  12. #762
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,866
    Quote Originally Posted by dabe View Post
    The rim weighed 384g.

    I was running tubeless. The impact broke the rim which caused the tire to leak down very quickly.

    I was running tubeless using gorilla tape with Continental Mountain King tires (version 1). I never had any trouble burping or getting the tires to seat.

    I was running 32 psi at the time of the failure.

    I agree that I might have damaged an alloy rim in same circumstances. We will never know for sure, since I promptly removed the rock.
    OK, for the sake of our testing, please rebuild the wheel with a similar weight alloy rim. Place rock back in spot. Hit it the same (or as close to) as possible and report back

    Seriously, bummer on the rim - and good job on the trail maintenance so the next person along doesnt suffer the same fate.

  13. #763
    knobby noob
    Reputation: axl886's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    94
    Just laced them up with Hope Pro 2 Evos:


  14. #764
    Greystoke
    Reputation: geo025's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    252
    Are you guys building these wheels with nipple washers?
    I think someone suggested it may help with spoke nipple alignment, but my worry would be
    the amount of carbon that the nipple could wear away.

  15. #765
    74 & 29 pilot
    Reputation: MTB Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2,253
    Quote Originally Posted by geo025 View Post
    Are you guys building these wheels with nipple washers?
    I think someone suggested it may help with spoke nipple alignment, but my worry would be
    the amount of carbon that the nipple could wear away.
    No, didn't find it necessary.
    MTBP
    "GIVE ME LIBERTY OR GIVE ME DEATH!"
    Turn on the truth: http://www.ronpaulchannel.com/

  16. #766
    bicycle rider
    Reputation: morganfletcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,711
    Quote Originally Posted by litany View Post
    Straight gauge spokes aren't stronger than butted spokes, they are weaker. Its a common misconception that the heavier spoke is somehow stronger. Spokes are very strong nevertheless. it's just harder to build with double butted spokes because they tend to "wind up" easier which just means when you are turning the nipple it's not turning on the spoke, you're turning the spoke which doesn't actually increase tension. There are techniques to deal with this it just makes building the wheel harder.
    DT-Swiss Aerolites, or a similar bladed spoke, and a good bladed-spoke holder are a great way to build a strong wheel to high tension without spoke wind-up. I built a set of Edge Composites (now ENVE) wheels like this. Helped me get the very high recommended spoke tension, safely and easily.

    Morgan

  17. #767
    RTM
    RTM is offline
    #1 Latex Salesman
    Reputation: RTM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,834
    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    DT-Swiss Aerolites, or a similar bladed spoke, and a good bladed-spoke holder are a great way to build a strong wheel to high tension without spoke wind-up. I built a set of Edge Composites (now ENVE) wheels like this. Helped me get the very high recommended spoke tension, safely and easily.

    Morgan
    I agree 100% with everything you said but for me at least, it is tough to stray from the tried and true (and reasonably priced) double butted spoke.

  18. #768
    Greystoke
    Reputation: geo025's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    252
    I've gone over this thread & the 29er & didn't see/read failures of the burlier build rims, Is that the case so far?

  19. #769
    74 & 29 pilot
    Reputation: MTB Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2,253
    Quote Originally Posted by geo025 View Post
    I've gone over this thread & the 29er & didn't see/read failures of the burlier build rims, Is that the case so far?
    I had a "beefed up" 402 gram 650b rim break running normal to more than usual tire pressure and they are sending me a new one. The front is going fine so far. Pics in the 650b/27.5 forum.
    MTBP
    "GIVE ME LIBERTY OR GIVE ME DEATH!"
    Turn on the truth: http://www.ronpaulchannel.com/

  20. #770
    obsessive
    Reputation: eurotrash666's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by geo025 View Post
    I've gone over this thread & the 29er & didn't see/read failures of the burlier build rims, Is that the case so far?
    There is one undeniable fact that you will find true 100% of the time: In any review or thread about mountain bike wheels, both extremes will be represented- those that hammer a wheelset and love it, and those that have "I was just riding along..." stories of catastrophic failure.

    We have varying riding styles and talents, different body weights and wheelbuilding skills. There are the silent majorities and the vocal minorities. Some demand the impossible, and are never satisfied. Some understand limitations and have realistic expectations.

    Use your judgement. I bought a set of these rims for the fun of an experiment. There are tried and true workhorse wheelsets out there if you can't afford to gamble. I would still buy Deemax wheels even if some dude on a forum posted a pic saying he folded two hoops and blew the freehub hopping a curb. I'd still avoid a $100 wheelset if some other dude claims three seasons of dirt jumping without ever having to adjust tension or bearing preload. There is enough info in this whopper of a thread to base a decision on so long as you are honest with yourself about how well you can build and ride these wheels, and accept that sometimes mountain bike parts break when pushed near the limit.
    Go out and ride your bike


  21. #771
    I quit e-MTBR
    Reputation: OldManBike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,149
    Well said.

  22. #772
    Greystoke
    Reputation: geo025's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by eurotrash666 View Post
    There is one undeniable fact that you will find true 100% of the time: In any review or thread about mountain bike wheels, both extremes will be represented- those that hammer a wheelset and love it, and those that have "I was just riding along..." stories of catastrophic failure.

    We have varying riding styles and talents, different body weights and wheelbuilding skills. There are the silent majorities and the vocal minorities. Some demand the impossible, and are never satisfied. Some understand limitations and have realistic expectations.

    Use your judgement. I bought a set of these rims for the fun of an experiment. There are tried and true workhorse wheelsets out there if you can't afford to gamble. I would still buy Deemax wheels even if some dude on a forum posted a pic saying he folded two hoops and blew the freehub hopping a curb. I'd still avoid a $100 wheelset if some other dude claims three seasons of dirt jumping without ever having to adjust tension or bearing preload. There is enough info in this whopper of a thread to base a decision on so long as you are honest with yourself about how well you can build and ride these wheels, and accept that sometimes mountain bike parts break when pushed near the limit.
    Thanks for the blog....

    I decided it was worth the risk so placed an order for the heavier built rims last week, they should be popping out of the mold any time now.
    I'll lace up the front front wheel, see how it rides then venture on to the rear when I'm happy with it.

    I remember not that many years back I had a carbon bar that folded on me in a race, not a great experience I want to repeat. Now I'm confidently using Carbon bars again & they are stronger than any alloy bars I've owned( but still expensive).

    Carbon rims I expect will get better & hopefully cheaper down the track & we will wonder how we ever rode on alloy rims, I just need to man up now & not become the crash test dummy again...

  23. #773
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    63
    Looking for advice on tubeless setup on the rims... Trying to mount 2.35 nevegals (non-ust) and cant get them to inflate at all, even with 3 layers of stans tape. The tire bead is very loose in the groove. Has anyone managed to get these to work tubeless?

    Only options seem to be to inflate at gas station with sealant inside - would this work?? The lbs said a bontrager strip wouldn't work as they are designed only for bonty rims, but others here seem to have had success.

  24. #774
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bajaguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    211
    Quote Originally Posted by highaltitude View Post
    Looking for advice on tubeless setup on the rims... Trying to mount 2.35 nevegals (non-ust) and cant get them to inflate at all, even with 3 layers of stans tape. The tire bead is very loose in the groove. Has anyone managed to get these to work tubeless?

    Only options seem to be to inflate at gas station with sealant inside - would this work?? The lbs said a bontrager strip wouldn't work as they are designed only for bonty rims, but others here seem to have had success.
    Having three layers of tape won't make it any easier to mount vs. one layer of tape. I ran a non UST Nevegal tubeless before on a Mavic wheel and remember it was pain to get the bead to seal. If you're using a floor pump forget about mounting it. You'll need a compressor so you can blast it with high pressure and its ok to have sealant in the tire. You really have to massage the bead all the way around to make sure you can make it seal. I remember it took me some time to get it to hook up.

    Bonty strips work great on these wheels and I have no issue running them. Not sure how they would work with Kenda tires but no issues mounting tires or holding air with Specialzed or Maxxis tires I've ran.

  25. #775
    MattSavage
    Reputation: mattsavage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    2,464
    Quote Originally Posted by highaltitude View Post
    Looking for advice on tubeless setup on the rims... Trying to mount 2.35 nevegals (non-ust) and cant get them to inflate at all, even with 3 layers of stans tape. The tire bead is very loose in the groove. Has anyone managed to get these to work tubeless?

    Only options seem to be to inflate at gas station with sealant inside - would this work?? The lbs said a bontrager strip wouldn't work as they are designed only for bonty rims, but others here seem to have had success.
    You must use a rim strip. Bontrager or Stans or ghetto... Something.
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

  26. #776
    74 & 29 pilot
    Reputation: MTB Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2,253
    I've had no problems with the Nevegal on L-B rim. Seated and sealed right up with an air compressor. Take the internals out of the valve and blast the air through the valve stem to get the tire to seat. 3 layers of tape is unnecessary and is taking up room to get the bead to seat. One layer of Stan's or Gorilla tape with overlap at the valve hole should work fine.

    Good Luck
    MTBP
    "GIVE ME LIBERTY OR GIVE ME DEATH!"
    Turn on the truth: http://www.ronpaulchannel.com/

  27. #777
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    34
    Got my rims in the promised 4 working days. Laced them over last night and am patiently awaiting arrival of tensiometer before mounting tires and whatnot.

    They build up very nicely...considering their rigidity, that should not be news...

    They are laced over to an I9 build with Stans rims. It was weird that the spoke holes are not staggered. Weight was almost a wash...maybe 50g lighter with the new set...much wider though. the Stans rims were a 355 and Arch (non-EX).

    I think I'll order and extra to keep in the gear locker for inevitable rock hit of operator error type wheel failure.

  28. #778
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    63
    Thanks for the tips. I'll try the rim strip as I've now run out of tape!

  29. #779
    RTM
    RTM is offline
    #1 Latex Salesman
    Reputation: RTM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,834
    FYI, for the archives...

    I just mounted a 2.35 maxxis dhf, wire bead, single ply, 42a "super tacky" tubeless with one layer of gorilla tape and Stan's sealant. Took about three puffs from the compressor for the bead to seat and had almost no leakage. Still holding firm 2 days later. It has been my best tubeless attempt to date and that includes an actual UST rim & tire. Good times.

  30. #780
    74 & 29 pilot
    Reputation: MTB Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2,253
    Quote Originally Posted by highaltitude View Post
    Thanks for the tips. I'll try the rim strip as I've now run out of tape!
    Target, Wal-Mart, Lowes and Home Depot sell Gorilla Tape "To Go" which is a roll that is already cut to 25mm for less than $3.
    MTBP
    "GIVE ME LIBERTY OR GIVE ME DEATH!"
    Turn on the truth: http://www.ronpaulchannel.com/

  31. #781
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by MTB Pilot View Post
    Target, Wal-Mart, Lowes and Home Depot sell Gorilla Tape "To Go" which is a roll that is already cut to 25mm for less than $3.
    I'm living about 10,000 miles away from any of those stores! But I should able to get the bonty strips on Saturday from my lbs. thanks.

  32. #782
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    22
    After several rear hub shipping mishaps I finally got my set built up, 1450g!

    Wider Rims UD Matte (~360g)
    DT revolution spokes (~110 kgf tension)
    DT 240S Rear Hub (10mm)
    Hope Pro Front (20mm)

    I also managed to mount them up tubeless without any issue. This is my first tubeless (and my first carbon) wheelset so I was pretty jazzed when it all worked right away.

    This is what I did:
    1" (25.4mm) Gorilla tape on the rim (overlapping the valve hole by 2" on either side)
    Mounted Tires (Mountain King II 2.4 Protection)
    2 Scoops of Stan's per wheel
    Inflate!

    I had recently purchased a high volume floor pump from Lezyne that supposedly can mount tubeless tires. Not the case here and I don't have a compressor so I was kind of annoyed that it didn't work. I decided to try a CO2 cartridge (16g) and it worked right away on both tires, it took one cartridge per tire and they were about 25 psi after the cartridge had emptied.

    I did not put any soap on the bead and the beads still seated right away. The tires were mounted on another wheelset for the last few weeks though which supposedly helps.

  33. #783
    MattSavage
    Reputation: mattsavage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    2,464
    Quote Originally Posted by sraak View Post
    I had recently purchased a high volume floor pump from Lezyne that supposedly can mount tubeless tires. Not the case here and I don't have a compressor so I was kind of annoyed that it didn't work. .
    Heh,heh... I fell for that sales pitch too. I wanted a pump that moved the most air for setting up tubeless and naturally the salesperson said the Lezyne was the best (coincidentally the most expensive!) but it didn't work worth crap. I hate the heads on those as well.

    I bought a Topeak Joe Blow Pro and it has worked about 80% of the time. That new Topeak JB Ace looks even better, though!
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

  34. #784
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    22
    Ha ha. yep. What's even more funny is that I bought the CNC version... Wait, maybe that isn't funny....

    The head is kind of annoying, I found out pretty quickly that if you use the screw on "flip chuck" adapater they have it removes the core when you're taking it off... ughh.. Oh well, I'm very happy to just use a CO2 cartridge to get teh job done.

  35. #785
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 'size's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,103
    so it looks like an even wider/DH version will be available at some point.
    info from ridemonkey :

    "Hello Noah,

    Thanks for your mail. Wish you will like our rims.
    One of our customer is going to design the much wider rim, it will be 35mm wide, and 27mm for the inner width. But it will take quite a long time to test.
    You can order from him when the rim is ready to sell. We will manufacture the rims for him.

    Thanks,
    Nancy"

  36. #786
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3
    What is the length of spokes to hubs 240s ,110 20mm front and 150mm rear with 26 extra wide rims stronger 450g ?

  37. #787
    Greystoke
    Reputation: geo025's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrewandy View Post
    What is the length of spokes to hubs 240s ,110 20mm front and 150mm rear with 26 extra wide rims stronger 450g ?
    You should find what you're after here.

    #1 Wheel Building SPOKE CALCULATOR Now Online | PROWHEELBUILDER

  38. #788
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nybike1971's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,881
    My experience with the Light Bicycle carbon rims has been very disappointing. I built a set of their UST compatible 26in wide rims in August 2012 and the rear rim cracked while I was preriding the Moab Enduro race course down Porcupine Rim at the end of September. I had a Conti Mountain King II 2.4 tire tubeless at 28psi mounted on the rim when it cracked and I weigh 165lbs. For reference, I had ACL reconstruction surgery in May so am not taking any chances this year and riding very conservatively.

    I had to scramble and buy a rear wheel so I could ride in the race and finish my Moab trip.





    They replaced the rim under warranty and they sent me what they called a reinforced rim (around 400g). I rebuilt the wheel (CK hub and DT Comp spokes at 110kgf driveside tension) with the new rim and after only 4-5 rides it cracked again. This time I was running a Conti Mountain King 2.4 tire (850g) with a much beefier sidewall than the first generation MK tire, also tubeless at 28psi. I cracked the rim rolling down Bailey's at Blue Mountain (Peekskill, NY) - definitely just an XC trail with some rocks.







    They replaced this rim under warranty again and sent a new reinforced rim. They still charge $40 for shipping for the replacement rims, so not free, and I need to rebuild the wheel, again. Definitely not worth the uncertainty and the hassle for me. I am going back to the Stan's Flow that I had on those hubs for 4 seasons.

  39. #789
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,866
    Sucks to see - out of curiosity what did your stans flows look like after 4 seasons of riding (dents n dings?) Some people are just harder on wheels then others - and for those that do dent/ding alloy rims I dont think carbon is a great option.

    Plus side is their customer service appears ok - replacing both rims. Ya - you had to pay shipping, but that is not uncommon.

  40. #790
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nybike1971's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,881
    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Sucks to see - out of curiosity what did your stans flows look like after 4 seasons of riding (dents n dings?) Some people are just harder on wheels then others - and for those that do dent/ding alloy rims I dont think carbon is a great option.

    Plus side is their customer service appears ok - replacing both rims. Ya - you had to pay shipping, but that is not uncommon.
    Front Flow rim is perfect (that's the one I am going to use to rebuild the rear wheel) and the rear one had a couple of small dents over the years that I straightened out with channel locks and still holds air for a tubeless setup without any problems. The only reason I bought the carbon rims was to try and lose some rotating weight without compromising stiffness and width.

    In both cases when I cracked the rims the tires did not flat and Stan's sealed the crack. I don't consider myself particularly hard on gear. If you look at this video I shot a few years ago at Blue Mountain you will see exactly the spot on the trail where I cracked my rim (somewhere between 0:26 and 0:31):

    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/2389095?badge=0" width="500" height="359" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/2389095">Fall ride at Blue Mountain</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user989488">Luca Marinelli</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p>Ian, Pete, and Luca ride at Blue Mountain Reservation in Peekskill, NY on November 29, 2008.</p>

    As I said, it's an XC trail. Not really where I would expect a 30mm wide rim to fail.

  41. #791
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3
    What is de ERD for the 26 wide rims extra stronger 450g ?

  42. #792
    knobby noob
    Reputation: axl886's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    94
    Noob question:

    If the trails I ride are generally free of thorns, can I just choose to get a pair of Stan's universal valve stems, a set of UST tyres (say Small Block 8s), pump it up and go ride, without adding sealant?

    Currently running a tubed setup and I believe yellow tape was already installed by my LBS. Thanks!

  43. #793
    mtbr member
    Reputation: saruti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    274
    nybike1971
    maybe its time to use more PSI on the rear tire....
    I guess you would break any carbon rim with 28 PSI on the rear.

  44. #794
    obsessive
    Reputation: eurotrash666's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    232
    Q: How do I lose 1.5 lbs off my bike?
    A: Replace the Transition 32s with carbon!

    Painted by Light-Bicycle to match. Extra fiber added to 385g. Per Brian, they make the extra weight with more wraps of fiber, not just resin. Can't wait to build!
    Go out and ride your bike


  45. #795
    mtbr member
    Reputation: saruti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    274
    nice!!!

  46. #796
    ride more
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    2,623
    Wow...Looks great

  47. #797
    bicycle rider
    Reputation: morganfletcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,711
    Quote Originally Posted by saruti View Post
    nybike1971
    maybe its time to use more PSI on the rear tire....
    I guess you would break any carbon rim with 28 PSI on the rear.
    I disagree, 28psi in a 2.4" tire is not low pressure, especially for a 165lb rider.

    I've got ~400 miles of mtn bike racing on a set of Edge Composites (now ENVE) XC 29er rims. I've only ever run them tubeless, with xc-level tires, and I think the max I've ever had in them was 32psi. I'm just over 200lbs. I usually raced them at 28/29psi. I'm a lot heavier than nybike1971, and these tires were in the 2.0" - 2.2" range. I don't know anyone running tubeless that regularly puts more than 32psi in their tires, and no one running 2.4" tires who inflates them to more than 30psi. These light-bicycle rims should be able to survive in conditions, as well as or better than aluminum rims.

    I have a set of the 29er wide rims on the way, built with extra material. I do have some trepidation about their durability, but I'm treating this like an experiment. I will build them up and ride them hard on my fun bikes, and hopefully they hold up. I'd get more ENVE rims if I could afford them. Right now I have Stans Flow rims on three 29ers. Ideally I'd race them in the Downieville Classic next summer, but... we will see.

    There's a human tendency to defend an idea in which we've invested resources, or in which we place a lot of hope. Right? Keep an open mind about these rims. The price does seem too good to be true. We'll all find out. Hopefully light-bicycle.com, and carbon manufacturers like them are using our real-world experiences and broken rims to improve their product.

    Morgan

  48. #798
    bicycle rider
    Reputation: morganfletcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,711
    Quote Originally Posted by axl886 View Post
    Noob question:

    If the trails I ride are generally free of thorns, can I just choose to get a pair of Stan's universal valve stems, a set of UST tyres (say Small Block 8s), pump it up and go ride, without adding sealant?

    Currently running a tubed setup and I believe yellow tape was already installed by my LBS. Thanks!
    I don't think so, but try it and report back. Dry tubeless might work on a UST system - I believe that was the design goal - but in a Stans-style system, sealant helps to seal the system. The puncture repair aspect is another benefit. I don't have many tire-puncturing thorns where I live, but I have pinch-flatted and punctured tires, running tubeless, and sealant has gotten me home without putting a tube in. (Sometimes, I have to put a tube in.)

    Never a preposition end your sentence with,

    Morgan

  49. #799
    74 & 29 pilot
    Reputation: MTB Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2,253
    Quote Originally Posted by saruti View Post
    nybike1971
    maybe its time to use more PSI on the rear tire....
    I guess you would break any carbon rim with 28 PSI on the rear.
    Well your guess would be wrong then

    Been running Easton Havens carbon version at 28 PSI for 6 months of hard riding in the AZ rocky terrain and no failures and I'm 190 lbs without gear. My buddy has them in 26" and 29" with the same results.
    MTBP
    "GIVE ME LIBERTY OR GIVE ME DEATH!"
    Turn on the truth: http://www.ronpaulchannel.com/

  50. #800
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    400
    I will agree. I am 210lbs riding weight I ride extremely aggressive and I never inflate more then 30 psi even during park riding. This is on a Hans dumpf 2.3 Stan's flow. I just had my carbon wheels built looking forward to my first ride.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •