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  1. #1
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    Recommend me a bike shop in Edmonton ..........

    Got an in-law undergoing a, uh, medically mandated lifestyle change, and I've been encouraging him to start doing some cycling.

    He's got an old Hammer (think late '80's), but it's gonna' need a **** load of work.

    Who are the good guys in town who'll do the work necessary to make his beater ridable w/o giving him a buncha' 'tude or trying to sell him a new bike (ain't gonna' happen).

  2. #2
    I'm Riding It
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    Unfortunately, everywhere is going to mention getting a new bike IMO. But, at the price it might take to get an old beater in tip-top shape, you wouldn't be far off the price of an entry level hard-tail.

    But I have personal experience with Pedalhead Bicycle Works, especially if you talk to Chris (he is the owner) and explain the situation.

    I can't really vouch for any of the other shops, but I have heard good things about all the other bike shops as well. I do prefer dealing with a smaller shop because they do a better job IMO of getting to know the customer, and treating you right, going the extra mile.

    Hope you get it figured out!

    Cheers.
    www.bikeride.ca
    Alberta born-n-raised mountain bike racer.

  3. #3
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    Depending how motivated you or your in-law are you could try the Edmonton Bicycle Commuters' shop: edmontonbikes.ca/bikeworks

    You have to do your own wrenching, but there are volunteers who will help, they've got all the tools you'd need, and they've got a basic selection of cheap used or replacement parts.

    On one trip you'd probably be able to replace the tubes/tires, cables, brake pads, chain, and maybe some of the drivetrain? And that would at least probably make it rideable, although later you'd need to make a second or third trip to do the wheels/hubs/headset/bottombracket. (depending how bad shape the bike is in)

    Even doing your own work though, and using Bikeworks' cheap parts you'd probably be looking at a minimum of $75 just for all the consumables like tubes/tires, cables, brake pads, chain and gears. At a real shop it would be...$150+? And that's getting close to an entry level bike from a place like United.
    Last edited by newfangled; 03-14-2011 at 07:54 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by tungsten
    Got an in-law undergoing a, uh, medically mandated lifestyle change, and I've been encouraging him to start doing some cycling.

    He's got an old Hammer (think late '80's), but it's gonna' need a **** load of work.

    Who are the good guys in town who'll do the work necessary to make his beater ridable w/o giving him a buncha' 'tude or trying to sell him a new bike (ain't gonna' happen).

    looks like he needs to read up on bike mainance

    Get him a copy of Zinn The art of mountain bike maintance.

  5. #5
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    Ya' know, rather than being beat to crap I figure his ride is merely in a state of disuse.
    He didn't ride it all that much..............
    He also bought it in Edm. so I quess could revisit his OLBS, but I have a recommendation for Redbike + he lives not far from the UofA.

  6. #6
    rides with camera
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    Quote Originally Posted by tungsten
    He also bought it in Edm. so I quess could revisit his OLBS, but I have a recommendation for Redbike + he lives not far from the UofA.
    +1 on Redbike. Pedalhead, and Hardcore are great too. Any small shop is ten times better than any of the bigger shops. Stay far away from United.
    Fu(k cancer

    thelonebiker.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled
    Depending how motivated you or your in-law are you could try the Edmonton Bicycle Commuters' shop: edmontonbikes.ca/bikeworks

    Even doing your own work though, and using Bikeworks' cheap parts you'd probably be looking at a minimum of $75 just for all the consumables like tubes/tires, cables, brake pads, chain and gears. At a real shop it would be...$150+? And that's getting close to an entry level bike from a place like United.
    Approximate prices at BikeWorks (they might vary a bit, and this is going strictly for the cheap stuff, which work just fine):
    • $20 membership (or else shop time is $5/hr)
    • $10 8-spd chain
    • $15 8-spd cassette
    • $3 per tube, $10 per tire (but it's unlikely that either of these would actually need to be replaced--usually we just put some air in them and they work)
    • $7 to replace all the cables and housing
    • $5 to replace all the brake pads
    • $5-10 to replace the derailleurs with some decent used Deore-ish ones, if the old ones are toast


    $75 is a fairly decent estimate. And then your in-law will know his bike inside-out.

    You can also pick up your parts at your LBS and bring them to BikeWorks to assemble them yourself, if you prefer. We definitely have everything to fix up that old bike, though.

  8. #8
    Double-metric mtb man
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    +1 on Hardcore. Redbike has been decent the few times I've been over there.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

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