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  1. #1
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    Why the New Bicycles are Getting Heavier

    First they increase the handlebar clamp diameter from 25.4mm to 31.8mm.
    Then they increase the casette speed from 9 to 10.
    Then they increase the steerer tube diameter from 1-1/8 straight to 1-1/8, 1-1/2 tapered.
    Then they increase the front hub axle diameter from 9mm QR to 15mm and 20mm through axle.
    Then they increase the rear hub axle diameter from 10mm QR to 12mmx135mm through axle.
    Then they increase the rear hub axle length from 135mm to 142mm.

    Did I miss anything?

    All the "improvement" done to the bike has done nothing but increase the weight. When are they going to stop?
    Last edited by caesar148; 02-28-2013 at 09:39 PM.

  2. #2
    Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!
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    When people stop buying it?

  3. #3
    Zaf
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    When the excess weight stop's offsetting the increased performance.

  4. #4
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    I think the idea behind some things getting bigger (i.e. handlebars) is that you can add stiffness and actually maintain or reduce weight by reducing material thickness. Not sure if that applies to every situation mentioned above but I think a lot of the improvements provide "large" benefits (i.e. stiffness increases) for a relatively low or no weight penalty.

    I could be wrong but I believe that's the idea.

  5. #5
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    What about wheel diameter?....to be continued.

  6. #6
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    The sport is changing and bikes with it. All that Caesar148 mentioned above plus Dropper posts, huge tires, wider rims, etc.

    All this stuff adds up to: Stiffer, stronger bikes that can handle rougher terrain and just a lot more fun to ride!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaf View Post
    When the excess weight stop's offsetting the increased performance.
    Exactly.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalterN View Post
    The sport is changing and bikes with it. All that Caesar148 mentioned above plus Dropper posts, huge tires, wider rims, etc.

    All this stuff adds up to: Stiffer, stronger bikes that can handle rougher terrain and just a lot more fun to ride!
    I've been riding for over 30 years and I don't go any faster...I'm older though .

  9. #9
    ~ B A D A S S ~
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    Quote Originally Posted by caesar148 View Post
    First they increase the handlebar clamp diameter from 25.4mm to 31.8mm.
    Then they increase the casette speed from 9 to 10.
    Then they increase the steerer tube diameter from 1-1/8 straight to 1-1/8, 1-1/2 tapered.
    Then they increase the front hub axle diameter from 9mm QR to 15mm and 20mm through axle.
    Then they increase the rear hub axle diameter from 10mm QR to 12mmx135mm through axle.
    Then they increase the rear hub axle length from 135mm to 142mm.

    Did I miss anything?

    All the "improvement" done to the bike has done nothing but increase the weight. When are they going to stop?

    nonono this is right, And all these improvements are actual imporovements imo. And also disc brakes, wider rims, beefier tires etc. But the technology goes on, moving forward. I however find the bikes today much better than like 10 years ago. Some things I don't care much for, like 11sp and 10sp, but thats personal. But most of the rest is good I think. Also now you have the option of buying parts in whatever weight class and durability class you want. Me myself I always get parts with the best durability and function, these are usually heavy and beefy no ****. But still my new bike will only weight like 12kg, and it has the most indestructible parts ever created for bikes. I call that good ****. Gear I can depend on. On a sidenote I have not gotten a flat tire in like 15 years, and the last 4 has been daily use almost (commuting). The new tech is good, I just happen to dislike carbon (lol) and 11sp (what a fukcing joke) / 10sp ( no less joke than 11) and 9sp stuff. Other than that i have no complaints at all.

    on my last bike I never once looked at the weight on any of the parts, nor did I care. And they are all hand picked. I spend at least 1 week per component researching. I just read reviews and reviews seeking out the best **** out there, and found it. best according to me = most durable and long lasting. But lest just say6 i got a lot better stuff njow than 10 years ago. Better durablity at the same weight as old light parts. Its all good man.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

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    Specialized sucks ass.

  10. #10
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    I think slower riding is part of the "changing sport" thing. People have heavier bikes, ride slower uphill and scream downhill.

    Some of the "advances" may be overkill for most riders, but you can't argue the fact that a new trail bikes can handle about everything you can throw at them (and more).

    BTW, I've got 20+ years in MTB and another 10 on a BMX bike before that.

  11. #11
    Rock and/or Roll
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    Are you really complaining because bicycles are better now than before?

    Really?

  12. #12
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    Agree the market is changing as is the style of off road riding. Early MTB's were designed as a bike to take off road with a large input from the perspective of a road racer thus the focus on light weight and the forward raked, high top tube bikes that were common. Now they are designed with much more true offroad input as the sport has progressed.
    Riders are expecting more out of their bikes today.

    That being said, I still prefer to take to the hills or trails on my 22lb Schwinn Homegrown over some of the newer offerings I've ridden lately. I'll give up a few ledge drops to be able to fly up the hills. God bless Ebay.

  13. #13
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    Apparently, Spesh's OS28 front setup retains the 9mm skewer, but increases stiffness over both 15 and 20mm equivalents with less weight. While I can't confirm this aside from subjectively, it's the kind of rare tech I applaud (lighter, better).

  14. #14
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    The OS28 works well and retains the lighter QR design...my Stumpy has it. Overall, I think bike tech now is so much better than it was in the '90s when I started riding. My bike weighs what my '97 Homegrown weighed but it has:

    Disc brakes
    29" wheels
    Beefier fork
    Wider tires
    More gear range
    Wider bar

    Am I missing something?
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  15. #15
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    Oh @OP, my full-suspension, size large, 29er weighs about 22 lbs. I'm not seeing the weight penalties you describe.

  16. #16
    ups and downs
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    Considering that someone on the Rocky forum just built a carbon 650B Altitude 790 MSL full suspension bike with 150mm of travel at 23.8 pounds, I'd say it all depends where you look.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  17. #17
    Master of the Face Plant
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    If you want I can loan you this for a week. It may give you a new perspective on those fancy new bikes.
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
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