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  1. #1
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    Single-sided SPD bike pedals for off-road?

    Anyone using one-sided spd-style road pedals similar to these Ritchey's for off-road?

    If so, what are the pros and cons?

    If the back edge always hangs down due to gravity, they should be easy to clip into? If not, they would be very difficult to clip into?

    They seem to have better clearance?

    They are typically lighter?

    I'm using ATACs now and have used SPDs and SPD clones. I need to rebuild my ATACs, or buy some new pedals. I am leaning toward rebuilding or buying new ATAC's, just thought I would throw this topic out there to see if it is logical or practical or not.

    Thanks,
    AntiLoc
    Last edited by AntiLoc; 02-18-2007 at 06:02 AM.

  2. #2
    Jed Peters
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    LOL. That's precious!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    LOL. That's precious!
    I couldn't help but laugh

    Trevor!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntiLoc
    Anyone using one-sided spd-style road pedals similar to these Ritchey's for off-road?

    If so, what are the pros and cons?

    If the back edge always hangs down due to gravity, they should be easy to clip into? If not, they would be very difficult to clip into?

    They seem to have better clearance?

    They are typically lighter?

    I'm using ATACs now and have used SPDs and SPD clones. I need to rebuild my ATACs, or buy some new pedals. I am leaning toward rebuilding or buying new ATAC's, just thought I would throw this topic out there to see if it is logical or practical or not.

    Thanks,
    AntiLoc
    The pros are there are no pros.
    The cons can be summed up in one word: dangerous.
    Probably harder to clip into you'll find. Picture going down some horrid, yet fun rocky decent getting uncliped and trying to reclip before you fall. Conversely, imagine trying to bail out of roadie pedals at speed...
    Typically lighter no. Simple Twin Ti pedals are probably lighter then your average roadie pedal and Triple Ti even lighter.

    Perhaps rebuild your pedals but if you want to save weight look at the crank brother range of pedals.

    Trevor!

  5. #5
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    Have you used this type pedal on a road bike or a mtn bike?

    AntiLoc

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntiLoc
    Have you used this type pedal on a road bike or a mtn bike?

    AntiLoc
    Nope, and I just realized that my reply was more with regards to roadie pedals like SPD-R etc, so I appologise for that.

    All that being said, I cannot imagine that these would be of benefit you on the trails, and I still see since they are one sided that they could prove to be hazardous on the trails.

    I guess it comes down to the type of riding you do too. For technical stuff I would want 2/4 sided pedals.

    Trevor!

  7. #7
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Why???

    I guess the biggest question is "why would you want to do this??"

    Roadie pedals are 1-sided, which is VERY dangerous on a MTB. Roadie pedals are meant to be streamlined as much as possible, hence the clips only on 1 side. And since you don't need to feverishly clip into your pedals on the road, there's no reason for a 2-sided pedal on a road bike.

    Coversely, on an MTB there are many times where you need to feverishly clip into the pedals to save your a$$. MTB pedals also have 2-sided platforms, whereas the road pedals only have 1. So even if you don't clip in right away, you can stand on an MTB pedal on either side. Stand on the wrong side of a roadie pedal and your foot is going to slip off, which could mean a bad crash on the trails.

    Lastly, that little roadie pedal is going to disintegrate when it gets smashed on rocks. MTB pedals usually have some means of protecting the clips from rocks. Roadie pedals don't, so when that pedal comes down on a rock there is a good chance it will break.

    You can get a good pair of SPD MTB pedals for $40 or less (Wellgo MG-18's come to mind), so open your wallet and buy the right tool for the job.

    Thx...Doug

  8. #8
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    For general mountain bike riding, I would not use road pedals.

    However, if you're using it for STXC racing or on a wide open XC race course where you're sure you'll never get off the bike, then maybe...

    A few years ago, one well-known pro(I think it was Kirk Molday) used road his road pedals and shoes for the NORBA XC race at Big Bear, but mainly because he liked the power transfer of his stiff road shoes.... then again, Shimano and a few other brands have highend shoes with carbon soles now.

  9. #9
    Max
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    Michael Rasmussen (world champion XC 1999) used road shoes and pedals in many occasions. he said he liked the stiffer soles and lighter shoes. what is more, he was the most radical weight weenie in the peloton ever i guess: dura ace road hubs in the front, 1.7" Z-max tires on the rocky WC-course of sarentino (he had two flat on the time trial lap!!), and on the WC course in kaprun he used an XTR crank on the drive-side and a dura ace crank on the other.......


    however, forget about road pedals on a MTB race-bike!

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all of the replies.

    Here is what I am thinking:

    There are several models of this type pedal that can be had for under $125 that weigh less than 250gm/pr with cleats. The Ti models are all right at 200gm.

    The pedals can be used with regular MTB shoes.

    There is no pedal mechanism handing under my shoe to get smashed on a rock or a root, which I do on occasion. The added ground clearance could prove helpful when trying to pedal through turns that I should probably not be pedaling through.

    Most appear to be made just as durably as their MTB cousins.

    Here is the only question I have left to be answered along with some explaination of why I don't know the answer myself. Unless you have used these SPD (not SPD-R) pedals, or know someone who has, I don't think you can answer it whole-heartedly. I have not ridden as a serious roadie for over ten years, maybe longer. These pedals (single-sided SPD) did not exist then, or at least weren't very popular if they did. We had Look's and Time's and Shimano (Look clones) and Mavic (Look clones) and a few other Look clones. These pedals never flipped over when you unclipped. UNLIKE a two-sided MTB pedal, when you came out, the back edge dropped down due to gravity, and stayed there. No matter how much you rotated the cranks, the pedal was always in the same orientation to the ground. You could not easily put your foot on the back of it. You just hook the front of the cleat as you slide the sole of your shoe forward on the pedal surface and step down. The same movement every time, no matter where the pedal was in its rotation. I don't know any roadies to ask this question of. I am wondering if these pedals do the same thing, or do they spin and flip over as the cranks rotate, which would definately cause a problem!

    Thanks,
    AntiLoc

  11. #11
    Scott479
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    I've wondered the same thing-aren't there boards to post your

    question to roadies at Roadbike review? Isn't that the sister site to MTBR?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntiLoc
    Thanks for all of the replies.

    Here is what I am thinking:

    There are several models of this type pedal that can be had for under $125 that weigh less than 250gm/pr with cleats. The Ti models are all right at 200gm.

    The pedals can be used with regular MTB shoes.

    There is no pedal mechanism handing under my shoe to get smashed on a rock or a root, which I do on occasion. The added ground clearance could prove helpful when trying to pedal through turns that I should probably not be pedaling through.

    Most appear to be made just as durably as their MTB cousins.

    Here is the only question I have left to be answered along with some explaination of why I don't know the answer myself. Unless you have used these SPD (not SPD-R) pedals, or know someone who has, I don't think you can answer it whole-heartedly. I have not ridden as a serious roadie for over ten years, maybe longer. These pedals (single-sided SPD) did not exist then, or at least weren't very popular if they did. We had Look's and Time's and Shimano (Look clones) and Mavic (Look clones) and a few other Look clones. These pedals never flipped over when you unclipped. UNLIKE a two-sided MTB pedal, when you came out, the back edge dropped down due to gravity, and stayed there. No matter how much you rotated the cranks, the pedal was always in the same orientation to the ground. You could not easily put your foot on the back of it. You just hook the front of the cleat as you slide the sole of your shoe forward on the pedal surface and step down. The same movement every time, no matter where the pedal was in its rotation. I don't know any roadies to ask this question of. I am wondering if these pedals do the same thing, or do they spin and flip over as the cranks rotate, which would definately cause a problem!

    Thanks,
    AntiLoc
    Pictures usually say a 1000 words, but the one provided doesnt. The pedal almost looks like it wouldn't drop down like your traditional roadie pedal, but since I or it seems not many have used the pedal it is hard to give you an answer.

    That all being said, I still do not see any common sense in wanting to use one of these pedals, they are not all that light at 250g (My pedals are 48g lighter and more functional) or 200g (Can be beaten in weight by Triple Tis) and frankly just wouldnt be suited to XC riding conditions unless one is riding very smoothed out manicured courses.

    Just my 2 cents really....

    Trevor!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Max
    Michael Rasmussen (world champion XC 1999) used road shoes and pedals in many occasions. he said he liked the stiffer soles and lighter shoes. what is more, he was the most radical weight weenie in the peloton ever i guess: dura ace road hubs in the front, 1.7" Z-max tires on the rocky WC-course of sarentino (he had two flat on the time trial lap!!), and on the WC course in kaprun he used an XTR crank on the drive-side and a dura ace crank on the other.......


    however, forget about road pedals on a MTB race-bike!
    Now there is a serious WW if ever I have heard it. Intrestingly I know a racer who rides at WC level and uses roadie shoes, I assume the reasoning for that is again stiffness and weight, plus he can ride almost everything so he is rarely off his bike.

    Trevor!

  14. #14
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    Thanks for all the input

    Thanks to all for all of the input.

    I am going to stick with the ATACs I have now, they are far from dead, or I may try the Crank Bros. for a change and a little weight loss.

    Just wanted to see if anyone had actually tried this type pedal and what the result was.

    If I had received a, "Yes, I tried it and loved it" from someone, I was going to get a pair to try.

    I agree with all of the points made about safety, weight and such. Just wanted to "think outside the box" for a bit.

    Thanks again,
    AntiLoc

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