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  1. #1
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    Ti Bolt & Threadlock?

    I've replaced some rotor bolts with Ti equivalents, and most recently my brake caliper bolts, but can't believe I hadn't thought of this before now...

    I put Ti anti-seize/prep on those bolts, but as you know brake-related bolts typically come with threadlock on them.

    I can't imagine putting both on the bolt, so what does that mean? They won't seize, but might eventually work their way loose? Or is threadlock overrated?

  2. #2
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    If they are torqued properly with anti-seize they aren't likely to go anywhere, but they should be part of a regular maintenance checklist. The threadlock on brake bolts is part of the belts and suspenders, cover your butt, lawyer filled world we live in.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Ti Bolt & Threadlock?

    I wouldn't worry. Then again, I'm not into thread locker. I use it on pins for platform pedals, but that's it. Some people thread lock everything. I still haven't lost anything. Knock on wood.

  4. #4
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    I've never had any ti bolts shipped to me with loctite on them. So far the rotor bolts have held fine with just ti anti-sieze goo too.

  5. #5
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    I've been using ti rotor bolts with loctite on them for years and never had any of them seize. You're probably fine either way as long as they are torqued correctly - I go with 30 inch-lbs for ti rotor bolts.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by VT Mike View Post
    I've been using ti rotor bolts with loctite on them for years and never had any of them seize. You're probably fine either way as long as they are torqued correctly - I go with 30 inch-lbs for ti rotor bolts.
    You bring up an interesting point. I follow mfg. specs for torque, but guidelines are based on the original bolts. Theoretically Ti bolts could require different values.

    That said, I'd be reluctant to use 30 in-lbs across the board. For example (going from memory), Shimano specifies a range of torque for XTR calipers, with 61in-lbs in the middle. It would have to vary by application and bolt size.

  7. #7
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    Some titanium bolts come with blue loctite on them. For example, Formula caliper bolts.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfer1 View Post
    Some titanium bolts come with blue loctite on them. For example, Formula caliper bolts.
    Interesting. Apparently Formula isn't concerned about them seizing. (?)

  9. #9
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    The typical (Avid*) rotor bolt torque spec is 6.2Nm (54.75in-lbs) and the Ti bolts with rolled threads should be able to handle that just fine. The cheap Asian Ti bolts with cut threads might shear off, but if they do, those are not a bolt you want as a rotor bolt anyway, the cut threads create stress risers at the bottom of the V that will propagate cracks more easily and just shouldn't be used in critical places like stems and brake rotors.

    It's important to have enough torque that the bolts won't vibrate loose if you get some howling from the disc and all that vibration is working on the rotor bolts. You definitely don't want to overtorque them or you risk stripping out the hub.

    * edit
    Last edited by rockyuphill; 05-28-2013 at 09:32 PM.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    You bring up an interesting point. I follow mfg. specs for torque, but guidelines are based on the original bolts. Theoretically Ti bolts could require different values.

    That said, I'd be reluctant to use 30 in-lbs across the board. For example (going from memory), Shimano specifies a range of torque for XTR calipers, with 61in-lbs in the middle. It would have to vary by application and bolt size.
    I'm using Martas on most of my bikes, Magura specifies 34 in-lb for the original steel rotor bolts. I went by this chart (or one like it)
    http://www.hyperbolt.com/hyperbolt/d...ifications.pdf
    when I switched to ti rotor bolts (M5) and settled on 30 in-lb.

  11. #11
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    In a hurry, I've lubed Ti rotor bolts with Finish Line Teflon grease, torqued by hand to what felt right, and have never had anything come loose.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    Interesting. Apparently Formula isn't concerned about them seizing. (?)
    Loctite will act as anti-seize , as it will coat the Ti/Mg/Al interface. Not as effective as true anti-seize paste, but way better that nothing (and in all case, never use dry bolt anywhere).

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mac_Aravan View Post
    Loctite will act as anti-seize , as it will coat the Ti/Mg/Al interface. Not as effective as true anti-seize paste, but way better that nothing (and in all case, never use dry bolt anywhere).
    I'm a bit iffy on that. Any pre-loctited (is that a word?) bolt that I've seen from a manufacturer has a stripe of Loctite more or less in the middle of the threads. That of course is fine for Loctite.

    In this case the bottom threads are typically bare. With a Ti bolt, this would leave the bottom threads in direct contact with other metals. Given that the Loctite would hold the bolt in place, it might actually promote seizing as those bottom, bare Ti threads would never move at all. (?)

  14. #14
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    Galvanic corrosion might be the ultimate thread locker.
    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    I'm a bit iffy on that. Any pre-loctited (is that a word?) bolt that I've seen from a manufacturer has a stripe of Loctite more or less in the middle of the threads. That of course is fine for Loctite.

    In this case the bottom threads are typically bare. With a Ti bolt, this would leave the bottom threads in direct contact with other metals. Given that the Loctite would hold the bolt in place, it might actually promote seizing as those bottom, bare Ti threads would never move at all. (?)
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