Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Weight Weenie Shop Owner
    Reputation: DIRT BOY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,007

    Thanks Mr. Scary...

    I took your advice and got some Vittoria Open Corsa Evo CX tires and some latex tubes.

    After 50 miles the last 2 days, all I can say is DAMN!! These tires are sooo nice riding it's scary (no pun intended.). They ride is so silky and sweet and you hradley feel a bump or buzz in the road. I will be using these only for my Century rides and rides over 50 miles.

    I always hated latex tubes as they leak air to easily and are a pain to install, but with these tires, the ride is just to sweet!

    Thanks for the reccomendation.

    Aslo the Campy FD is slow and not as smooth as Shimano.
    Overall the Campy hoods feel much, much better and I like the shifting.

    Prefer Shimanos style of shifting though...But the carbon levers look so sweet!
    DIRT BOY
    Light-Bikes.com
    The Largest Site Dedicated to Light Weight Bikes and Sales
    Twitter: @lightbikes_com

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    934

    welcome

    to the world of open tubulars and latex tubes, i don't know how
    people ride regular clinchers

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,237

    Woooaaahhh. What are we talking about here!?

    Am I missing something here...the obvious???
    I don't have the $$ or the time to mess with tubulars on my road bike. I have been using Conti 3000's and regulars tubes. Is there something else I should be trying?
    Always open for improvements.

    KMan



    Quote Originally Posted by peabody
    to the world of open tubulars and latex tubes, i don't know how
    people ride regular clinchers

  4. #4
    Weight Weenie Shop Owner
    Reputation: DIRT BOY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,007

    "Open Tubulars" are just fancy clincher tires...

    made just like a tubular. My Vittorias are coton and polyester and have a tpi of 290!

    These blow every tire I have ever used away!!

    <table style="border-collapse: collapse;" border="0" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr><td class="ProdDisplay1">Vittoria Open Corsa Evo CX Clincher</td> <td class="ProdDisplay1" align="right"> <input id="strProductPartNumberBase" value="94822" type="hidden">
    </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%">Open Corsa CX clincher universally acclaimed for its reliability in road racing, in its new EVO version, is destined to even greater success. The new technology includes a new Kevlar® SiO2 3D compound with added silica, for reduced rolling resistance and better grip in the wet and the new composite Corespun K 290 TPI casing that uses a blend of Polycotton (cotton and polyester) and Kevlar® threads.

    The very high thread density of 290 TPI (equivalent to 1.100 threads per decimetre!) ensures maximum comfort even at high inflation pressures, while the added Kevlar® means even better cut resistance.

    Like the Corsa Evo tubular, the PRB puncture resistant belting placed under the tread makes the Open Corsa EVO CX an exceptional clincher
    .</td></tr></tbody> </table>
    DIRT BOY
    Light-Bikes.com
    The Largest Site Dedicated to Light Weight Bikes and Sales
    Twitter: @lightbikes_com

  5. #5
    Feeding your addiction
    Reputation: Ventanarama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    2,663
    I agree 100%. I've been using them for years, they are the only road tires I will ride now. Even at 140psi they feel smoother than most tires at 90.

    Larry
    Mountain High Cyclery
    larry@mtnhighcyclery.com
    "It is inhumane, in my opinion, to force people who have a genuine medical need for coffee to wait in line behind people who apparently view it as some kind of recreational activity". - Dave Barry

  6. #6
    banned
    Reputation: nino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,770

    now let's talk about Rollingresistance!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ventanarama
    I agree 100%. I've been using them for years, they are the only road tires I will ride now. Even at 140psi they feel smoother than most tires at 90.

    Larry
    Mountain High Cyclery
    larry@mtnhighcyclery.com
    wasn't it in here i got bashed for saying even between road tires there is a huge difference in rollingresistance? i might be wrong and it was in the german forum but anyway - once again german roadie magazine TOUR tested several different high-end road clinchers and the results surprised even myself:

    you will find that Vittoria Corsa Evo CX right up front in rollingresistance too (27,1 watts).

    a Conti GP3000 which is a tire most tend to believe is an upper class tire is almost dead last. just have a look at the rollingresistance 2 TIRES have: 46.6 watts! that's almost twice as much as the faster ones. (measurements done at 7 bar pressure, 30 km/h and 85 kilo system weight (bike+rider))

    on the other hand almost all good rolling tires have bad puncture resistance which is shown in the upper graph. they have a scientific test where a "needle" tries to penetrate a inflated tire for like 3 minutes and only a couple of tires survived those 180 seconds. you can see how many seconds each tire resisted written in the blue graphs. the Vittoria is almost last there....

    i for myself have picked the Michelin Pro Light as my winner:
    i know it rolls faster than the regular Michelin Race and isn't half as puncture prone than my Conti Supersonics and it is still light at around 170-180g.

    the Vittoria is 230g which is just too much for my taste

    by the way:
    they also tested rollingresisance at 3 different speeds:
    30, 40 and 50 kilometers per hour. and also as front and rear tires individually....

    there is more details to each tire in that test but the graphs give a nice overview. they even tested how tires react to sunlight by exposing them to UV...insane those germans.

    TOUR called the Michelin Pro Race the winner as it has the best mix of both good rolling and puncture resistance.

    now seeing the HUGE difference in roadtires i guess we agree that RR also plays a BIG factor in MTB tires, right?

    have you seen the Specialized tires once again back in the pack? those tires really stink!!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by nino; 02-03-2006 at 06:07 AM.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    934

    vittorias

    are super fast rolling, the michelin lights are pretty good too. i don't know why people
    think gp3000's are great. they are harsh and slow in my opinion. 1 point to note on
    the vittorias, i had an old set at the end of the yr so i used them in my spinner, and
    the tire leaves a pile of rubber dust, like the roller was made of sand paper, underneath
    the rear wheel. i have never had another tire do that and have had other open tubulars
    in my spinner. i believe the rubber compound just makes the tire
    more supple and stickier in the corners.

  8. #8
    Weight Weenie Shop Owner
    Reputation: DIRT BOY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,007

    Nino, I find that chart a little amusing...

    It shows the Schwalbe Stelvio Plus to roll much better than the Stelvio. It's the EXCAT same tire with an extra thick layer of rubber to prevent flats.
    ????

    Maybe the extra 90g+ helps it get more momentum which let it roll faster?
    The test the Stelvio Evolution pack is slower rolling than the Stelvio Plus?
    get real! the compound on the Stelvio Evo pack, lets the tire roll faster just from casing alone.

    The Supermoto with the evo casing rolls very, very fast on the road @ 25/28psi!!!

    Also RR is VERY overated at times. Conditions on the surface a big effect on RR. Like a tire with larger knobs may have a higher RR on a test machine, but if you have better grip than say a semi-slick with lower RR in reality might be faster!

    Similar on the road. the tire my have RR better than another, but if a tire with higher RR offer a better more supple ride that allows the rider to go faster without extra effort, this would be better in real life riding.
    Last edited by DIRT BOY; 02-03-2006 at 08:30 AM.
    DIRT BOY
    Light-Bikes.com
    The Largest Site Dedicated to Light Weight Bikes and Sales
    Twitter: @lightbikes_com

  9. #9
    banned
    Reputation: nino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,770

    RR is a measurement...

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRT BOY
    It shows the Schwalbe Stelvio Plus to roll much better than the Stelvio. It's the EXCAT same tire with an extra thick layer of rubber to prevent flats.
    ????

    Maybe the extra 90g+ helps it get more momentum which let it roll faster?
    I wonder why they did to test the Stelvio Evolution pack.

    The Supermoto with the evo casing rolls very, very fast on the road @ 25/28psi!!!

    Also RR is VERY overated at times. Conditions on the surface a big effect on RR. Like a tire with larger knobs may have a higher RR on a test machine, but if you have better grip than say a semi-slick with lower RR in reality might be faster!

    Similar on the road. the tire my have RR better than another, but if a tire with higher RR offer a better more supple ride that allows the rider to go faster without extra effort, this would be better in real life riding.
    sure in MTB RR is just one factor as terrain and grip can have a big influence too...not so on the road where concrete is basically concrete. no difference in grip. at least not in the dry and not to a degree you can feel it. in the wet there are amazing differences which the germans also tested when they did a rain-tire comparison test...

    a faster tire on the road is just that - faster. if another tire is not so supple its just not that comfortable but hasn't that big an effect in the speed. it's really the carcass inner "friction" that makes all the difference. finally there's also aerodynamics where a 20 or even 18mm tire might be better than a 23mm but then again it's the shape of the rim behind that has more effect than the tires width.

    anyway - you have already experienced the difference a simple tire change can make. that's what i'm always telling i experienced when i switched to the Nokian NBX Lite on my MTB. that tire rolls superfast and feels so much more supple than other tires. sure - grip,durability etc. are on another sheet but for my style of terrain it still is my favourite tire.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,396

    New question here. I wonder why.......

    No Vred's in the test?

  11. #11
    Recovering couch patato
    Reputation: Cloxxki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,019
    I wonder how my Rivendell Ruffy Tuffy 28's would do. Were there any 28mm tires in the test?

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •