Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    322

    Straight bars vs. risers.

    Seems like most racers use straight bars as opposed to risers, whats the reason for that?

  2. #2
    Older & Faster...downhill
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    445
    Riding position in the cockpit.

  3. #3
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    4,292
    Low front end is more efficient for climbing. Also straight bars are lighter.
    Keep the Country country.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    674

    you know already

    Quote Originally Posted by OuterNational
    Seems like most racers use straight bars as opposed to risers, whats the reason for that?
    Because you posted this on the Weight Weenies board, can I assume you already knew what the answer would be?

  5. #5
    Dr. Frost
    Reputation: Fastskiguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,602
    The only reasons for a riser bar is to get the bars high enough and for looks. Otherwise you can do it with a stem. And they are heavier. If you like high bars and like to look "Moto" then the riser bars are perfect!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by GlazedHam
    Because you posted this on the Weight Weenies board, can I assume you already knew what the answer would be?
    I meant to post this in the XC race section but I assume they would give me the same answer.

  7. #7
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,582
    Riser bars were the original for mountain bikes because they got adopted from motocross bike part catalogs. Then we got various bullmoose 1-piece bar/stem combos, but again it was still the same major bar sweep with a bar that put the grips much higher than road bike bars did. Then when mountain bike racing became all about cross country racing, riders wanted lower and narrower body positions and we got skinny little flat bars (21 to 23" was the usual range from most brands with a 22" / 560mm width being most common) with very little sweep (0, 3 or 5 degrees was the normal amounts... 5 most common). Then of course there was a complaint about a loss of leverage with the small bar widths which is when bar-ends came along. The late-90s with full suspension bikes and the move away from XC racing being the be-all/end-all of the sport, riser bars came back into fashion and bar ends and narrow flat bars went away from the mainstream.

    29ers though, and other bikes with high front ends have made flat bars popular again, but this time they're wider and have a decent sweep angle to them usually. As to bar-ends, people run them when they want more hand positions and/or leverage, regardless of whether its on a flat bar or riser. I've put them on risers for customers for just that reason. Hell Zoom offers a riser bar that includes some elaborately adjustable bar-ends (they are double adjustable...but they add a pound to the 1/2 pound riser bar) for some really dramatic hand position options. I've got a couple of them and I'll likely use one for a commuter bike project this spring.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  8. #8
    Lover, not a fighter...
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    281
    Many people use riser bars because most flat bars out there don't offer the sweep and width that risers do. That's the reason. If you don't need the rise, sweep or width, stick with narrower and flatter bars, eh? If you alternate between racing and trail riding or training, I think It's good to go with a zero or slight rise stem, like 5-6 degrees at most, and alternate between the bars and position you want or need to suit the situation. Especially if you only have one bike. A lot of us have more than one.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: markw1970's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight
    Riser bars were....
    What an excellent and well written post. Thank you.

    +1

  10. #10
    Dr. Frost
    Reputation: Fastskiguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,602
    Here's a link to Salsa's site, they have a flat bar 710mm wide with a whopping 17 degree bend. It might be an option

    http://www.salsacycles.com/handlebars_mtn.html

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    322
    I just got an alum flat w/ 5 degrees for $20 shipped on ebay, straight from hong kong, Ill see if I like it.
    Just flipped my stem and moved a spacer, trying to get a lower front end.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=390035372564

    Its even lighter than my carbon race x lite riser, WTF!

  12. #12
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,582
    Yeah that's not usual, Zoom offers some carbon-wrapped aluminium flat bars in a 600mm width that are pretty light (around 160g) for the money. They'll certainly outlast most any Al flat bar of the same weight.

    Oh here are those multi-position risers I mentioned, for really weird folks...



    The bar end sections fit with expanding wedges, the riser bar itself is about 270g and 580mm width and about a 30mm rise, 31.8 bar clamp. The bar-ends add about a pound to the riser bar but they're double adjustable. You can adjust the tilt angle of the whole bar-end relative to the handlebar itself (like on any other bar-end), but the front sections are also adjustable so you can adjust their swing as it were. Don't want them curving in front of your hands? No problem... curve them downwards and ride them like drop bars.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  13. #13
    Cheezy Rider
    Reputation: Rufudufus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,684
    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight
    As to bar-ends, people run them when they want more hand positions and/or leverage, regardless of whether its on a flat bar or riser. I've put them on risers for customers for just that reason.
    And you didn't get arrested?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,297
    ^^thanks for stretching the page and makeing it nearly impossible to read

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by Rufudufus
    And you didn't get arrested?
    Those things are hideous!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 743power's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    334
    im running 20mm risers only because I couldnt find a flat bar that was wide enough that I liked. I'm actually on the search for a pair right now because I want to get my front end a little lower still. I've narrowed it to the salsa carbon flat and the syntace duraflite carbon.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    193
    You can also flip your stem over to get the bars lower.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ramjm_2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    827
    Well in mine and many C'dale owners’ cases, the lack of stem selection for the headshok equipped bikes means using a riser. I've always used flat bars but since C'dale only makes stems with 5 degree and 20 degree options your kind of hosed. That said I'm waiting with bated breath for the rumored Extralite C'dale stem.

  19. #19
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,582
    Don't C-dales are all the post 1.5 standard headshoks and lefty's use a regular 1.5 steerer
    compatible stem? So any brand of 1.5 stem should fit right? Regardless of the bar clamp
    diameter (as plenty of brands offer flats in both 31.8 and 25.4) any other 1.5 stem should fit. Syncros makes a 12 degree one that's reasonably light.

    http://www.syncros.com/stems.htm
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  20. #20
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,582
    Quote Originally Posted by Garlock
    ^^thanks for stretching the page and makeing it nearly impossible to read
    fine fine, i'll resize the images....
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ramjm_2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    827
    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight
    Don't C-dales are all the post 1.5 standard headshoks and lefty's use a regular 1.5 steerer
    compatible stem? So any brand of 1.5 stem should fit right? Regardless of the bar clamp
    diameter (as plenty of brands offer flats in both 31.8 and 25.4) any other 1.5 stem should fit. Syncros makes a 12 degree one that's reasonably light.

    http://www.syncros.com/stems.htm
    Well here is the real kick in the balls. The head tube will now take a traditional 1.5 (older ones used the same diameter but a shallower cup) headset but the proprietary steerer tube is around 1.56ish. So unless it is an out of spec 1.5 stem it's a no go. Syncros does make that funky VRO system but it's just a bit too bizarre for my taste.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •