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  1. #1
    IllumaDucati
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    Good job! Ruegamer Uberlight carbon Titus Racer X



    This is my new toy that I built up about a week ago, based on a frame that was on eBay recently. The carbon main triangle was custom-made in Tempe, Arizona and weighs about 800 grams, yet it has exceptional torsional rigidity. (There's a 2007 thread about the frame here.)



    The goal here was a bike that's fast and light enough to be fun to ride without giving up comfort or reliability. There are certain parts that I just happen to like, and I already had most of them when the frame came along.

    I used Ergon GX-1 grips and 110-gram Alpha Q carbon bars, a Syntace F99 stem with titanium bolts, XTR M980 pedals, an XTR M970 crankset, an XTR Yumeya chain, an XTR M970 shifter, an XTR M971 mid-cage derailleur, a Dura-Ace 12-27 cassette, a Terry Fly saddle with carbon rails, a 6KCycles seatpost, Avid SL levers with Avid Ultimate brakes, and I had the master wheelbuilder Dave Thomas in Fountain Hills, Arizona lace up a pair of 1,360-gram wheels using DT 240 hubs and ZTR 355 rims.

    I prefer to use my all-time favorite tires the superb Continental Race King Supersonic 26 x 2.2s with Slime tubes, which add weight but always get me home. As it's shown here, it weighs 21 pounds four ounces, so with regular tubes it would be about 20 1/2 pounds.







    Above are three shots of the bike with the new 180-gram DT Swiss XR-180 carbon shock I installed today. Dialing in the air pressure and adjusting the rebound was easy, and this shock has a lockout for sprinting and hard climbing that works perfectly.

    This bike rides so well it amazes me. And most importantly, the dog seems happy.



    To get the bike finished, I used an antiquated 2000 Manitou Mars fork that I had (originally bought to provide spare parts for my two 2000 Klein Adroit Pro bikes that came with them), with the 70-gram damping (and useless lockout) assembly removed to speed it up and get it down from 1,205 grams to 1,135 grams. The upgrade for the bike that I'm working on is building a RockShox SID fork with all the trick stuff.

  2. #2
    Illuminati
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    thats a pretty good weight given the slime innertubes.

    just curious as to why you're running a triple crankset, but with no front derailleur or shifter?

  3. #3
    IllumaDucati
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    When I started building it up, I found that the clamp on the XTR M970 front derailleur I have wouldn't go around the bottom of the seat tube, which is over 37mm.

    I have five bikes and they all have XTR M970 cranksets with triple chainrings, but only two of them have front derailleurs. If I need to, I can reach down and move the chain over with my left hand while I'm riding. This set-up is a compromise, but it eliminates derailleur cage clearance and adjustment issues and also saves close to a pound.

    Using two XTR spacers on the right side of the bottom bracket shell allows me to run the 32 or even the 22 all the way out to the 12. I've only noticed the chain complaining when it's on the 32 and the (largest) 27.

    A more detailed explanation can be found here.

  4. #4
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    Nice looking bike!

    Where did you find the Stans 355 for rim brakes?

  5. #5
    IllumaDucati
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbike01 View Post
    Nice looking bike!
    Thanks! I've really been enjoying it.

    Quote Originally Posted by kbike01 View Post
    Where did you find the Stans 355 for rim brakes?
    About a year ago Stans had the 32-hole rim-brake rims on sale for forty bucks, so I bought four of them. The 28-spoke rim-brake rims are on sale now, here.

  6. #6
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    cool nice to se the frame built up Im happy that it went to a good home
    la vida sigue.

  7. #7
    IllumaDucati
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    Here's an update on the bike.

    Last week I installed the 2012 RockShox SID XX World Cup dual-air 100mm fork that I bought new on eBay. As it arrived, it weighed 1,410 grams, and cutting the steer tube made it 1,370 grams, including the Xloc lockout assembly.

    I also bought new 2008 SID lowers that have V-brake posts and wanted to use it to convert the fork, but it turns out that they won't fit. Although they're both 32mm, I was told that the 2008 80mm tubes and 2012 100mm tubes have different lengths and threading. For me to be able to use the 2012 SID fork, I'll have to make this my first bike with disc brakes.

    I haven't decided on which brakes to use, and am leaning towards Avid BB7s for simplicity, or something lighter that will also be more expensive.

    In the meantime I'm having a pair of wheels laced up using a pair of six-bolt DT 240 hubs and an NOS pair of 32-hole Stan's ZTR Race 295-gram rims. The projected weight for these is 1,300 grams.

    Last night I installed new aluminum chainstays and carbon seatstays from Titus. Then I mocked it up with some spare (Ritchey WCS XC LTD 1,600-gram) wheels and a pair of Continental X-King RaceSport 2.4-inch tires to make sure there was lots of clearance.

    This morning I installed Race King Supersonic 2.2s and took a careful test ride with no brakes, in order to make sure the new swingarm worked well, and also to be able to continue experimenting with adjustments to the fork, which I'm trying to get to be as compliant as possible.

    The bike now weighs exactly 21 1/2 pounds as it sits, with Slime tubes, which add a good half-pound over conventional, lightweight tubes. The weight of the brakes will be offset by the new wheels, which will be ten ounces lighter than these, so it should be very close to 21 1/2 pounds with the disc brakes, and with lightweight tubes, just under 21 pounds.

    I see there's a lighter version of the Avid BB7 brake for road bikes, called the BB7 SL Road. The calipers are intended to be used with road bike levers, but I wonder if they could work well with the original version of the Avid Ultimate levers, which were designed for cantilever brakes. If not, I'll have to use conventional BB7s, or hydraulics.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadsters View Post
    ...I was told that the 2008 80mm tubes and 2012 100mm tubes have different lengths and threading...
    This is not strictly speaking correct. If your 2012 SID WC is the 80/100mm version (and not the 120mm version) then all the parts are interchangeable back to 2008/09 when the first 80/100mm 32mm stanchion SIDs were introduced.

    If your 2012 SID WC has a straight (and not tapered steerer), then its definitely the 80/100mm version. The 120mm version WC only comes with a tapered steerer.

    Download the 2013 parts manual from SRAM and you can see the interchangeable part numbers on the 80/100mm forks.

    I have both 80/100mm and 120mm SIDs. The v-brake 80/100mm lowers work on all 32mm SIDs made in 80/100mm.

    If in doubt, pull it apart and compare before you let anyone tell you otherwise.

  9. #9
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    Can I ask: if you have stans rims, why not just go tubeless with the conti tyres and lose the tubes altogether? Should save you weight and keep some puncture resistance. In the 4 years ive been riding tubeless I've had 3 punctures that I've had to repair on the trail by sticking a tube in to get me home.

  10. #10
    IllumaDucati
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    This is not strictly speaking correct. If your 2012 SID WC is the 80/100mm version (and not the 120mm version) then all the parts are interchangeable back to 2008/09 when the first 80/100mm 32mm stanchion SIDs were introduced.

    If your 2012 SID WC has a straight (and not tapered steerer), then its definitely the 80/100mm version. The 120mm version WC only comes with a tapered steerer.

    Download the 2013 parts manual from SRAM and you can see the interchangeable part numbers on the 80/100mm forks.

    I have both 80/100mm and 120mm SIDs. The v-brake 80/100mm lowers work on all 32mm SIDs made in 80/100mm.

    If in doubt, pull it apart and compare before you let anyone tell you otherwise.
    It was a SRAM tech who first told me that the 2008 and 2012 SID lowers were not interchangeable, and when I mentioned this to Kevin at Suspension Experts, he agreed. The easiest way to verify this would be for you to call him at (828) 255-0205.

    Quote Originally Posted by roaringboy View Post
    Can I ask: if you have Stan's rims, why not just go tubeless with the Conti tires and lose the tubes altogether?
    The Continental Race King Supersonic 2.2 is my favorite tire, but as discussed in the 50-page Continental Race King 2.2 thread, the consensus is that when used without tubes, the sidewalls are so thin that they leak sealant.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadsters View Post
    The Continental Race King Supersonic 2.2 is my favorite tire, but as discussed in the 50-page Continental Race King 2.2 thread, the consensus is that when used without tubes, the sidewalls are so thin that they leak sealant.
    Nearly all lightweight tyres do in my experience. They soon seal if left on their side overnight though. Eventually the sealant will block up the pores that are leaking. At that point I usually then add a little more so there's some sloshing round to deal with any punctures.
    Last edited by roaringboy; 01-15-2013 at 01:44 PM.

  12. #12
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    Like this thread, thx for doing it. Nice lighting on the photos too.

  13. #13
    IllumaDucati
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    Like this thread, thx for doing it. Nice lighting on the photos too.
    Hey - thanks. This bike is a keeper. Here's a shot I took yesterday morning:


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