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  1. #1
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    Non-porky titanium post?

    Not truly a WW question since carbon is lighter, but I'm looking for a 27.2 titanium seatpost in a 350mm with a little bit of setback. Going on a lightweight HT and I need some flex in the post. Also need a great clamp so my setback isn't tilting the saddle up while riding.

    Given up finding a Syncros ti. And the few ti posts I've found are either questionable in quality or they weigh close to the heavy aluminum versions.

    Is there a light 27.2 post with a good clamp that doesn't cost an arm and a leg ala Moots or other high-end boutique brands.
    Last edited by danK; 11-01-2011 at 10:51 PM.

  2. #2
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    well i have been looking

    i think that if you really wont light weight it always costs a arm and a leg

    Ritchey Classic 2-bolt Seatpost 27.2mm 350mm Polished | eBay

    New 2011 3T Doric LTD Seat post 27.2 350mm Carbon TTT | eBay

    J&L UltraLight Titanium Seatpost 27.2-174g/Road or MTB | eBay

    here is few i found depends on how much you wanna spend

    also what is heavy for you ? how many grams

  3. #3
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    Durable Ti seatposts will tend to be heavier than aluminium, why not carbon if you want it for comfort? A carbon post makes a big difference on a hardtail, lots of vibration damping.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill View Post
    Durable Ti seatposts will tend to be heavier than aluminium, why not carbon if you want it for comfort? A carbon post makes a big difference on a hardtail, lots of vibration damping.


    When you try and get something so light, all posts are prone to breaking eventually. Just make sure you inspect the part every once in a while for damage, and make sure the clamp is good.
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  5. #5
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    I was looking for ti to get more flex at slower speeds while seated. Like coming down the back-side of a small embedded rock.. Carbon does a great job muting higher frequency vibration. I want the pseudo g-out flex.

    At least that's what I thought the ti post would do compared to carbon. It'd be nice if I was wrong since carbon 27.2 posts are everywhere.

    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill View Post
    Durable Ti seatposts will tend to be heavier than aluminium, why not carbon if you want it for comfort? A carbon post makes a big difference on a hardtail, lots of vibration damping.

  6. #6
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    There's not that much flex in a Ti post, they can only flex fore/aft/side to side, and the seat angle is too steep to get any real vertical compliance, it would be rear ward. You'd maybe get a bit of absorption on washboard sort of surfaces, but just a bit compared to what you get from Ti chainstays & seatstays. If they're flexy enough to absorb a lot of shock, they may eventually crack. And of course they don't just flex when you're on rough stuff, they'd also flex when you're pedaling when seated, so that might not really be what you want. They aren't a suspension post by any measure.
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    Good input! I'm not looking for a lot of flex, just a little for those slow speed seated "ooomph" situation if that makes sense. It's going on a 29er carbon HT with low psi tires, and I use a good saddle and riding pad, but the past few weeks I was thinking a little bit of rearward flex would make things darn near euphoric.

    Maybe I'll look at the Cannondale SAVE post.

    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill View Post
    There's not that much flex in a Ti post, they can only flex fore/aft/side to side, and the seat angle is too steep to get any real vertical compliance, it would be rear ward. You'd maybe get a bit of absorption on washboard sort of surfaces, but just a bit compared to what you get from Ti chainstays & seatstays. If they're flexy enough to absorb a lot of shock, they may eventually crack. And of course they don't just flex when you're on rough stuff, they'd also flex when you're pedaling when seated, so that might not really be what you want. They aren't a suspension post by any measure.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK View Post
    I was looking for ti to get more flex at slower speeds while seated. Like coming down the back-side of a small embedded rock.. Carbon does a great job muting higher frequency vibration. I want the pseudo g-out flex.
    .
    This comment makes no sense to me. Am I missing something? The post has no idea how fast you are traveling, and a carbon post will reduce vibrations more then a Ti or aluminum post will due to the nature of the material. Has anybody experienced anything different from this with various seatposts?

    Also, sounds to me like what you really want is a lightweight suspension seatpost. No matter the material the post is made of, you will not get this kind of dampening unless you go with a suspension seatpost.
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    A carbon part on my road bike mutes the vibration. Small road chip which the bike is traveling quickly over. Probably two layers of bar tape would do the same job as a carbon bar, but that's a whole other discussion.

    The carbon bar on my mtb mutes some feel on higher speed trails or fireroads. I was looking for some flex in situations where I'm crawling up a trail and roll over a softball sized rock, or root for example, and while seated bounce or roll off and back onto the smooth part of the trail. I was hoping to get a little rearward flex instead of a solid thud in my lower back.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR1 View Post
    This comment makes no sense to me. Am I missing something? The post has no idea how fast you are traveling, and a carbon post will reduce vibrations more then a Ti or aluminum post will due to the nature of the material. Has anybody experienced anything different from this with various seatposts?

    Also, sounds to me like what you really want is a lightweight suspension seatpost. No matter the material the post is made of, you will not get this kind of dampening unless you go with a suspension seatpost.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK View Post
    The carbon bar on my mtb mutes some feel on higher speed trails or fireroads. I was looking for some flex in situations where I'm crawling up a trail and roll over a softball sized rock, or root for example, and while seated bounce or roll off and back onto the smooth part of the trail. I was hoping to get a little rearward flex instead of a solid thud in my lower back.
    I'm pretty sure you are going to get more "rearward flex" out of a carbon post. If this is not the case, can someone please correct me? Please include the post your using to get this extra flex as well.
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  11. #11
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    If not ti then KCNC Scandium posts are light

  12. #12
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    You're likely on the right track with that Cannondale SAVE seatpost, I think it was supposed to be capable of substantial rearward flex..

    Niner also has a RDO carbon post with some rearward flex.
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  13. #13
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    Get a Thudbuster! Get an Ericksen seatpost. Get a Groovy "disco stick". Get one with some setback!
    Should weight between 250 and 300 grams(50-100 grams more that a good carbon post). Thudbuster weights more but offers much more damping!

  14. #14
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    Titanium doesn't flex, nor does alum. Carbon doesn't either. The op is def thinking too much. Carbon posts don't even cut down that much trail "chatter" get carbon for weight savings, titanium for bling, and alum for price.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin_Federline View Post
    Titanium doesn't flex, nor does alum. Carbon doesn't either.




    Au Contraire, all the materials you listed do indeed "flex".

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Au Contraire, all the materials you listed do indeed "flex".
    Exactement. But I think carbon would be the most prone to flex then alu or steel, since it's fiber and not monoblock. But I might be wrong. I know some metal alloy to have some surprising properties, but maybe a big fat-ass slinky will do ?

    David
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Au Contraire, all the materials you listed do indeed "flex".
    Way to take everything I said literally. Yes everything will flex given a large enough force, but designers dont engineer 'flex' in posts like the op stated.


    I've studied metallurgy for 7 years and been welding landing gear as a career for as long.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin_Federline View Post
    Way to take everything I said literally. Yes everything will flex given a large enough force, but designers dont engineer 'flex' in posts like the op stated.


    I've studied metallurgy for 7 years and been welding landing gear as a career for as long.
    So what about a slinky ?
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin_Federline View Post
    Way to take everything I said literally. Yes everything will flex given a large enough force, but designers dont engineer 'flex' in posts like the op stated.


    I've studied metallurgy for 7 years and been welding landing gear as a career for as long.
    Have a look at the Cannondale SAVE seatpost, they have indeed designed it to flex fore and aft. It's about half the diameter in the fore/aft direction.

    Cannondale S.A.V.E. Seatpost

    When a hardtail is too hard, a full-suspension too heavy and bouncy, and a soft-tail just seems awkward and wrong, what kind of options are you left with? How about an ultra-light, super simple seatpost that gobbles up stutter-bumps and rough trails with 40mm of travel due to superior engineering, not some gimmicky, complicated suspension design! The Cannondale S.A.V.E. seatpost was designed to take the edge off of riding a hardtail mountain bike without having to sacrifice anything. Cannondale is just awesome like that, unwilling to sacrifice weight, performance or ride quality. The post absorbs harsh trail conditions due to a flattened section of the seatpost that flexes under high load. It doesn't bounce under hard pedaling, and it's not likely to break. (Carbon Fiber doesn't have a fatigue life like metals do) The Save seatpost is as light as any other carbon seatpost out there and cost about the same as any other high-end carbon seatpost. So the real question is "Why wouldn't you buy one?" Little bit of trivia for you, the term Save come from the road bike world. S.A.V.E stands for Synapse Active Vibration Elimination.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Non-porky titanium post?-save-seatpost.jpg  

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  20. #20
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    Would appear Rocky has found your solution.

  21. #21
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    I can't take credit for that, the OP already identified the SAVE as a possibility, I was just providing the supporting data.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill View Post
    I can't take credit for that, the OP already identified the SAVE as a possibility, I was just providing the supporting data.
    You saved the day once again. Admit it.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  23. #23
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    No, I couldn't admit that.

    To bring the thread back around to a more fundamental discussion, if you're after something to take the bumps out of a ride, think seriously about getting a proper suspension bike. Having your saddle move around messes about with your relationship to the pedals, with a decent FS bike you maintain your riding position.
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  24. #24
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    I already have a 24.5 pound 4 inch travel FS but on a lot of trails it's overkill so I go to the 20 pound carbon 29er. Super fast and fun, but looking to plush out the ride for those softball sized rocks or a root or two or a square edge hole was the priority. Almost like riding a HT off a curb at walking speed and staying seated. Not that you would stay seated but many dirt trails put me in similar seated situations while pedaling hard.

    Was able to test ride a 29er carbon HT this afternoon with a SAVE post and it was great. Didn't dance around under normal pedaling or jack with the saddle to pedal distance (like my old Softride road bike did, eeek), and I could feel it when slowly dropping off a curb. That's exactly the kind of riding situation I felt a "flexy" ti or carbon post would do the job. Not the high frequency stuff. Just the 5 or 6 times per long ride my back would get jolted from a low speed seated BAM.

    Found a seller of a brand new 27.2 SAVE. Wants $160.

    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill View Post
    No, I couldn't admit that.

    To bring the thread back around to a more fundamental discussion, if you're after something to take the bumps out of a ride, think seriously about getting a proper suspension bike. Having your saddle move around messes about with your relationship to the pedals, with a decent FS bike you maintain your riding position.

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