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  1. #1
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    Need some weight weenie input on my TRc build list..

    -2013 32 FLOAT 140 CTD-ADJ FIT WHITE 15QR 1.5T FACTORY

    -Shimano XT M785 Pre-Bled Disc Brakes Metal Pads
    -Shimano XT RT86 IceTech 160mm 6-bolt Rotor pair (or 180/160 haven't made final decision)
    -Answer ProTaper AM Handlebar Carbon 1" Rise 720mm 31.8mm Black/white
    -Salsa Flip-Lock Seat Clamp 35mm
    -Cane Creek 110 Zero Stack Headset
    -Jagwire Ripcord DIY Derailleur Kit
    -Ergon GS1 or GA1 Evo grips
    -Thomson 30.9 x 410mm elite Black Seatpost

    -2013 Shimano XT 1x10 170mm Crank 11-36 Cassette
    -Shimano HG94 10 speed MTB Chain
    -Shimano XT M780 10 Speed Triple 170mm no rings -Crankset with Bottom Bracket
    -Shimano XT M771 11-36 10 speed Cassette
    -Shimano XT M780 10 speed Shifter Rear
    -Shimano XT M786 Direct Mount Shadow Plus GS Mid-Cage Rear Derailleur Silver
    -Surly Stainless Steel Ring 34t x 104mm
    -MiniG2 SL Guide 32-36T BB Mount

    -Rims- pacenti tl28 or flows 650b
    -Hope pro 2 Hubs 10mm rear
    -sapim triple or dr Swiss double butted spokes
    -pacenti neo motos
    -DT Swiss RWS Thru-Bolt 10x135mm Aluminum Lever

    What should I change or have I missed? Goal is as light as possible while still being durable and without breaking the bank.

    Thanks in advance!

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  2. #2
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    Some tires other than the Neo-Motos.

    Schwalbe Nobby Nics are incredibly fast, have great grip, and are pretty darn light.

    That, and I'd get rid of the riser bar, but I guess that's just personal preference.

    Wheels/rims. I'd go carbon. I know, I know, they're expensive. But trust me: very much worth it. Look into the Light-bicycle 30mm rims if the budget won't allow for the more expensive options.

    Also, no adjustable seatpost? If I ever buy a bike off the rack again, that's pretty much a prerequisite for me, for that sort of riding.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Some tires other than the Neo-Motos.

    Schwalbe Nobby Nics are incredibly fast, have great grip, and are pretty darn light.

    That, and I'd get rid of the riser bar, but I guess that's just personal preference.

    Also, no adjustable seatpost? If I ever buy a bike off the rack again, that's pretty much a prerequisite for me, for that sort of riding.
    Le Duke how's the hold up on those nobby nics when running tubeless?

    I would definitely have the Thompson dropper on the list if it was out. All the ones put now seem to have a lot of reliability issues, but I am going to get one on this build when one comes out that's reliable. Have you had good experience with one?

    Thanks!

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Wheels/rims. I'd go carbon. I know, I know, they're expensive. But trust me: very much worth it. Look into the Light-bicycle 30mm rims if the budget won't allow for the more expensive options.
    The only ones in my range are the light bicycle but that just makes me nervous.. Love to go carbon, but yeah thats a pretty important functional piece of the puzzle to get from across the pond.


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  5. #5
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    Honestly, I've never owned a dropper post.

    The mountain bikes I've had/have are: GF Parago 29er, Anthem X 26er, Giant Glory DH, chinese Focus Raven 29er knock off. Don't really need one on any of those.

    I've used them when borrowing friends' bikes, but don't have any long term durability reports. Great idea, and when functioning, are a game changer for some folks.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Honestly, I've never owned a dropper post.

    The mountain bikes I've had/have are: GF Parago 29er, Anthem X 26er, Giant Glory DH, chinese Focus Raven 29er knock off. Don't really need one on any of those.

    I've used them when borrowing friends' bikes, but don't have any long term durability reports. Great idea, and when functioning, are a game changer for some folks.
    Ok thanks for the input!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Butter View Post
    Love to go carbon, but yeah thats a pretty important functional piece of the puzzle to get from across the pond.

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    Just so that you are aware, everything in your build list comes from "across the pond" including the frame itself (with the exception of the Thomson).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by losjefes View Post
    Just so that you are aware, everything in your build list comes from "across the pond" including the frame itself (with the exception of the Thomson).
    I'm aware but I know they are companies with people in this country that I can follow up with and that honor warranties and such. Thanks for the heads up though. As much as I would love to buy everything from here that's just not financially feasible at this time.

  9. #9
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    Wheels:
    Am classic hubs
    DT supercomp spokes
    Light bicycle carbon or Arch EX 650b.
    Formula R1 rotors are 40gr lighter per rotor than XT.
    Nobby Nic 2.25 rear (or 2.35 if fits) and 2.35 front.


    Cranks:
    SLX cranksweight the same as XT (592gr) so save money with SLX or go lighter with xtr970 cranks (535gr)

    Drop the flip lock and buy a dropper post. Heavier but faster.

    Rotor Q ring 33t Alu.

    MiniG2 SL Guide combined with shadow plus RD is overkill and thus heavy. Unless you want the protection go MRP 1X and save weight
    Last edited by trek551; 11-14-2012 at 08:00 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by trek551 View Post
    Wheels:
    Am classic hubs
    DT supercomp spokes
    Light bicycle carbon or Arch EX 650b.
    Formula R1 rotors are 40gr lighter per rotor than XT.
    Nobby Nic 2.25 rear (or 2.35 if fits) and 2.35 front.


    Cranks:
    SLX cranksweight the same as XT (592gr) so save money with SLX or go lighter with xtr970 cranks (535gr)

    Drop the flip lock and buy a dropper post. Heavier but faster.

    Rotor Q ring 33t Alu.

    MiniG2 SL Guide combined with shadow plus RD is overkill and thus heavy. Unless you want the protection go MRP 1X and save weight
    Why do you pick the am classics?
    Can you compare the performance of the formula 1 rotors vs the xt's?

    Want to wait for the Thompson dropper since none of the ones out now seem to be very reliable.

    Like everything about the nobby nics except the price..

    Considering the XO/ X9 cranks so I could do a direct mount bling ring. Weight would be around 640 w a 34t bling ring and BB. Haven't read good things about the XO cranks though so maybe not. Plus they are more $. Race face also has some pretty light cranks.

    Think your right about the guide. I will most likely forgo the bash/ guide combo and just go for a top guide.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Butter View Post
    -2013 32 FLOAT 140 CTD-ADJ FIT WHITE 15QR 1.5T FACTORY

    -Shimano XT M785 Pre-Bled Disc Brakes Metal Pads
    -Shimano XT RT86 IceTech 160mm 6-bolt Rotor pair (or 180/160 haven't made final decision)
    -Answer ProTaper AM Handlebar Carbon 1" Rise 720mm 31.8mm Black/white
    -Salsa Flip-Lock Seat Clamp 35mm
    -Cane Creek 110 Zero Stack Headset
    -Jagwire Ripcord DIY Derailleur Kit
    -Ergon GS1 or GA1 Evo grips
    -Thomson 30.9 x 410mm elite Black Seatpost

    -2013 Shimano XT 1x10 170mm Crank 11-36 Cassette
    -Shimano HG94 10 speed MTB Chain
    -Shimano XT M780 10 Speed Triple 170mm no rings -Crankset with Bottom Bracket
    -Shimano XT M771 11-36 10 speed Cassette
    -Shimano XT M780 10 speed Shifter Rear
    -Shimano XT M786 Direct Mount Shadow Plus GS Mid-Cage Rear Derailleur Silver
    -Surly Stainless Steel Ring 34t x 104mm
    -MiniG2 SL Guide 32-36T BB Mount

    -Rims- pacenti tl28 or flows 650b
    -Hope pro 2 Hubs 10mm rear
    -sapim triple or dr Swiss double butted spokes
    -pacenti neo motos
    -DT Swiss RWS Thru-Bolt 10x135mm Aluminum Lever

    What should I change or have I missed? Goal is as light as possible while still being durable and without breaking the bank.

    Thanks in advance!

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    IMO, it's worth keeping the 180mm rotor up front. The bike likes fast, and having the extra stopping power when coming into something hot is nice - worth the weight.

    Not stupid light or spendy, but dependable stuff - dropper post? Depends on what your trails and riding are like. I've found it worth the weight, by far.

    Another IMO: I found Surly stainless rings to be on the flexy and uh, really bendy side of things. Stiffer alu rings can be had.

    If you need/want bash protection, you can either use the full guide just with the lower roller removed, or run an XCX/1X with a bash. Yes, you have to cut the plastic upper guide bits down to make them work with the bash, but it's easy to do, and those are the parts that are cheap and easy to replace if you change your mind.

    With a clutch rear mech, on a 5" bike, IMO, the full guide is redundant. A good top guide works well, paired with short cage and short chain length, and a good SS ring up front. Of the two uppers guides mentioned, I've found the XCX to be sturdier, and less flexy. I feel it gives better drop protection if running it on its own. I also feel it gives better and easier adjustment. For a full guide, skip MRP or e.13 and go for a Straightline Silent Guide. Quieter, no moving parts, less stuff to break/go wrong, maybe even a touch lighter.


    Unless you take the rear off a lot, ditch the RWS for a Hadley 10mm thru-bolt. Sure, takes a 6mm allen to undo, but less stuff sticking out, and less stuff to potentially break/screw up.

    Grips, bar, seating are all personal preference items run what ya' like and is comfy. Lighter weight won't mean crap all if you aren't comfortable or confident on or in your equipment.

    I love my TRc.

    26# on the nose - not a weight weenie bike by any stretch, but light enough for my tastes, comfortable, and I have no worries about any durability.

    Getting it lighter without compromising either my preferences, durability, or wallet isn't happening.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Butter View Post
    What should I change or have I missed? Goal is as light as possible while still being durable and without breaking the bank.
    Just my impression, but how much do you value light weight? XT is great for reliability but not so much for weight. If you want lighter, consider SRAM, no? Your wheel and tire selections makes no sense to me, but hey..

    If you want XT and good reliability, why not go with the standard XT build kit and make a few minor mods. Weight weenies 101 - Mass makes the most difference when it's high on the bike or when it's rotational. When it's rotational, the further from the axis of rotation, the greater the effect.

    On mine, the only mods are ESI grips, Thompsone Masterpiece 350mm post, WTB Ti saddle, Q Superlight tubes. The stock bar and stem are already quite light. Works and feels very nice.


    Like this?




    Masterpiece 350mm post and WBT Ti Silverado



    ESI Grips, very nice, very light.

    Santa Cruz TBc
    Pivot 429c

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover View Post
    IMO, it's worth keeping the 180mm rotor up front. The bike likes fast, and having the extra stopping power when coming into something hot is nice - worth the weight.

    Not stupid light or spendy, but dependable stuff - dropper post? Depends on what your trails and riding are like. I've found it worth the weight, by far.

    Another IMO: I found Surly stainless rings to be on the flexy and uh, really bendy side of things. Stiffer alu rings can be had.

    If you need/want bash protection, you can either use the full guide just with the lower roller removed, or run an XCX/1X with a bash. Yes, you have to cut the plastic upper guide bits down to make them work with the bash, but it's easy to do, and those are the parts that are cheap and easy to replace if you change your mind.

    With a clutch rear mech, on a 5" bike, IMO, the full guide is redundant. A good top guide works well, paired with short cage and short chain length, and a good SS ring up front. Of the two uppers guides mentioned, I've found the XCX to be sturdier, and less flexy. I feel it gives better drop protection if running it on its own. I also feel it gives better and easier adjustment. For a full guide, skip MRP or e.13 and go for a Straightline Silent Guide. Quieter, no moving parts, less stuff to break/go wrong, maybe even a touch lighter.


    Unless you take the rear off a lot, ditch the RWS for a Hadley 10mm thru-bolt. Sure, takes a 6mm allen to undo, but less stuff sticking out, and less stuff to potentially break/screw up.

    Grips, bar, seating are all personal preference items run what ya' like and is comfy. Lighter weight won't mean crap all if you aren't comfortable or confident on or in your equipment.

    I love my TRc.

    26# on the nose - not a weight weenie bike by any stretch, but light enough for my tastes, comfortable, and I have no worries about any durability.

    Getting it lighter without compromising either my preferences, durability, or wallet isn't happening.
    I agree about the rotor.. Can't hurt. Which dropper have you had a good return on investment with? What chainring do you prefer? Flexy is not the way to go. I chose it due to the stainless but if its not strong then no point in being durable.

    I am going to forgo the bash I think and just do a top guide.

    I think your right about the Hadley as well. Thanks for the input Scrublover! Nice ride too!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by icsloppl View Post
    Just my impression, but how much do you value light weight? XT is great for reliability but not so much for weight. If you want lighter, consider SRAM, no? Your wheel and tire selections makes no sense to me, but hey..

    If you want XT and good reliability, why not go with the standard XT build kit and make a few minor mods. Weight weenies 101 - Mass makes the most difference when it's high on the bike or when it's rotational. When it's rotational, the further from the axis of rotation, the greater the effect.

    On mine, the only mods are ESI grips, Thompsone Masterpiece 350mm post, WTB Ti saddle, Q Superlight tubes. The stock bar and stem are already quite light. Works and feels very nice.


    Like this?




    Masterpiece 350mm post and WBT Ti Silverado



    ESI Grips, very nice, very light.

    Open to wheel and tire suggestions. Considering the nobby nics now. You are correct the XT selection is based on reliability and cost not weight. I feel it will hold up better and I got a way better deal on it. Although I am considering switching the cranks out.

    Thanks for the advice icsloppl. How much did your TRc come out to on the scale?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Butter View Post
    I agree about the rotor.. Can't hurt. Which dropper have you had a good return on investment with? What chainring do you prefer? Flexy is not the way to go. I chose it due to the stainless but if its not strong then no point in being durable.

    I am going to forgo the bash I think and just do a top guide.

    I think your right about the Hadley as well. Thanks for the input Scrublover! Nice ride too!
    I've got a Gravity Dropper nearing seven or so years old on my hardtail that gets a lot of use. It's had a couple issues, all taken care of speedily and well by the company. Easy to service, work on your self, get parts for. Pre-set stops, but static cable. Of all out there, IMO, it's the most long term dependable. The remote plays well with most other bar controls. I've the 1"/4" drop. If it's 4" down and I'm having second thoughts about a move, I'm on the wrong bike. If pure reliability is a concern, this is your post.

    Reverb on the TRc - first one a dud right out of the box, even with doing a full bleed/basic service. Second one, post line cutting/bleed and install has been trouble free for about a year. Have bled it once about every six months. Upside: infinite adjustment range. Functionality is smooooooothe. Downside: does take a bit more effort to keep it running smoothly, may or may not be a big deal. I like to spend quality garage time with the bikes, so no worries for me. The housing loop - not really a deal breaker once you figure out good routing for the frame. I've had it on two frames (and have another on a Giant Reign-X) and have had no issues with it getting caught/pinched in the linkages)

    Either way, if you think you'd use one enough to go for it, get a right hand remote version and run the remote on the left (at least for the Reverb and the GD) that puts the button right where your thumb is - out of the way of crash damage, and way mobettah functionally/ergonomically. Anyhow, just depends on your terrain, and how you ride. My area is constant up/down/up/down/up/down with all sorts of fun techy bits thrown in, so I use the posts a lot. Nice to come up to a drop, roller, log ride, whatever...post is down, hit the feature, post is up, pedal on without even really breaking stride.

    If no bash, well, whichever you get a good deal on for a top guide.
    MRP or e.13. The Paul is nice, but doesn't play as well with the linkage on this frame, so I'd avoid it. I've a preference for the XCX, for the reasons noted in my prior post. A bit less flexy and robust, I feel with better coverage and adjustment, at a slight weight penalty.

    Anyhow, it all really depends on budget, what/how you like to ride.

    Getting the TRc to 25-26# and keeping it durable to withstand abuse isn't hard, or too crazy spendy. Lighter than that and it's either more expensive than I'm willing to pay, or making compromises in durability or preferences. You can have my dropper post when you pry it from my cold, dead butt cheeks.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover View Post
    I've got a Gravity Dropper nearing seven or so years old on my hardtail that gets a lot of use. It's had a couple issues, all taken care of speedily and well by the company. Easy to service, work on your self, get parts for. Pre-set stops, but static cable. Of all out there, IMO, it's the most long term dependable. The remote plays well with most other bar controls. I've the 1"/4" drop. If it's 4" down and I'm having second thoughts about a move, I'm on the wrong bike. If pure reliability is a concern, this is your post.

    Reverb on the TRc - first one a dud right out of the box, even with doing a full bleed/basic service. Second one, post line cutting/bleed and install has been trouble free for about a year. Have bled it once about every six months. Upside: infinite adjustment range. Functionality is smooooooothe. Downside: does take a bit more effort to keep it running smoothly, may or may not be a big deal. I like to spend quality garage time with the bikes, so no worries for me. The housing loop - not really a deal breaker once you figure out good routing for the frame. I've had it on two frames (and have another on a Giant Reign-X) and have had no issues with it getting caught/pinched in the linkages)

    Either way, if you think you'd use one enough to go for it, get a right hand remote version and run the remote on the left (at least for the Reverb and the GD) that puts the button right where your thumb is - out of the way of crash damage, and way mobettah functionally/ergonomically. Anyhow, just depends on your terrain, and how you ride. My area is constant up/down/up/down/up/down with all sorts of fun techy bits thrown in, so I use the posts a lot. Nice to come up to a drop, roller, log ride, whatever...post is down, hit the feature, post is up, pedal on without even really breaking stride.

    If no bash, well, whichever you get a good deal on for a top guide.
    MRP or e.13. The Paul is nice, but doesn't play as well with the linkage on this frame, so I'd avoid it. I've a preference for the XCX, for the reasons noted in my prior post. A bit less flexy and robust, I feel with better coverage and adjustment, at a slight weight penalty.

    Anyhow, it all really depends on budget, what/how you like to ride.

    Getting the TRc to 25-26# and keeping it durable to withstand abuse isn't hard, or too crazy spendy. Lighter than that and it's either more expensive than I'm willing to pay, or making compromises in durability or preferences. You can have my dropper post when you pry it from my cold, dead butt cheeks.
    Can't get a more direct review than dead butt cheeks lol. Thanks Scrublover for all the info!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Butter View Post
    Why do you pick the am classics?
    Can you compare the performance of the formula 1 rotors vs the xt's?
    Am classic hubs are 340gr per pair vs 470gr for Hopes.
    Formula rotors are the lightest I could find with no warping issues.

    I have large 2011 Trance X1 with a 1x10 setup weighting 25.2lbs with the reverb. Once I replace the SLX cassette with XG1080 it will drop below 25. With a TRC frame the bike would weigh less than 24. Not bad for a strong and not super expensive build.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by trek551 View Post
    Am classic hubs are 340gr per pair vs 470gr for Hopes.
    Formula rotors are the lightest I could find with no warping issues.

    I have large 2011 Trance X1 with a 1x10 setup weighting 25.2lbs with the reverb. Once I replace the SLX cassette with XG1080 it will drop below 25. With a TRC frame the bike would weigh less than 24. Not bad for a strong and not super expensive build.
    Wow trek551 that's an impressive weight for a trance.. Very nice!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Butter View Post
    Open to wheel and tire suggestions. Considering the nobby nics now. You are correct the XT selection is based on reliability and cost not weight. I feel it will hold up better and I got a way better deal on it. Although I am considering switching the cranks out.

    Thanks for the advice icsloppl. How much did your TRc come out to on the scale?
    25.75 with pedals and light tubes. Going tubeless and an XTR crankset would be another lb or so.

    Probably going with Maxxis Ikon Exo's next...
    Santa Cruz TBc
    Pivot 429c

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Butter View Post
    Wow trek551 that's an impressive weight for a trance.. Very nice!
    Thanks.

  21. #21
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    Looks like you got some great advice so far, besides what everyone else said, I think a Rock Shox Revelation XX 140 will be half a pound lighter than the Fox Float, but, I have never ridden one so I couldn't tell you how it will perform relative to the Fox.

    Oh and I read somewhere that many non-Shimano rotors are wider than Shimano stock rotors, so it may drag. You might be able to counter this by letting out some fluid and/or re-bleeding .

    Edit: I checked my brand new Formula R1 180 rotor: 1.93 - 1.95 mm

    But performance wise I run Formula R1 180 front / 160 rear (with Formula R1 brakes) - very strong and good modulation, never had any warping. Agree you want to keep 180 front . . . I had a 160 front for a while and had some fading on longer downhills around here (SF bay area so a long downhill is 20min+)
    Last edited by ddprocter; 12-05-2012 at 09:49 AM.

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