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  1. #1
    Alright, let's ride!
    Reputation: LowCel's Avatar
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    My IF Ti CJ - roadie light bike

    Well, I was just browsing around and saw that dirtboy posted his roadie so I figured what the heck. Here is my IF Ti Crown Jewel that I built over the summer.

    Since this pic I have replaced the pedals with speedplay tyler hamilton zero stainless pedals. I have also replaced the bar with a Kestrel EMS Pro SL OS and I replaced the stem with a Specialized S-Works 110 mm.

    The bike is built with mostly Campy record except for the FSA carbon pro crankset and CaneCreek 200SL brakes. The brakes are extremely light but they just don't quite cut it for the WV hills. I ordered a set of Campy record brakes to replace them.

    As of right now it weighs a little under 16 1/4 pounds.

    Anyway, here are some crappy pics of it.



  2. #2
    Trail rider and racer
    Reputation: Trevor!'s Avatar
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    Lovely bike.

    Awesome looking or something - Drool worthy in fact
    Trev!

  3. #3
    I like bikes :)
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    yes.. definately a beauty
    *record* drools......

  4. #4
    Get your freak on!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Scary
    Campagnolo looks good but doesn't work as well as Shimano.
    Most of the guys busted for doping this year were using Campy, so what does that say?
    It says your an idiot j/k.

    Very very nice bike! I LOVE IF's....

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Scary
    Campagnolo looks good but doesn't work as well as Shimano.
    Most of the guys busted for doping this year were using Campy, so what does that say?
    you're not really serious are you?

  6. #6
    I like bikes :)
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    ive ridden both shimano (105, ultegra and dura ace) and campy (centaur and chorus), and i have to say, i like the centaur better than dura ace and the chorus was just a dream. much snappier shifting than shimano
    and i dont think that the groupo that the people were riding who got busted for doping has anything to do with anything lol

  7. #7
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    Reputation: LowCel's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone.

    Mr. Scary, are you joking?

    I've ridden every shimano there is from Sora up to DuraAce. I have never ridden anything nicer than Record though. However, I'm not saying that the record is nicer than the dura ace either. They are just different. The truth is as long as everything is tuned properly all components work great. The biggest plus with Campy is how long it lasts and how long it stays tuned. Oh, and the fact that carbon looks sweet!

    BTW..I have shimano xt on my superlight and shimano tiagra on my cross bike. I am by no means anti shimano. I believe that tuning is 90%, component choice is the other 10%.

    The reason I chose Campy Record on this bike is because I built this bike to last.

    Most of the guys busted for doping this year were using Campy, so what does that say?
    Uhhhhhhhhh..........honestly, I don't think it says anything. Pro's ride what they are paid to ride.
    Last edited by LowCel; 12-23-2004 at 06:27 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowCel
    Thanks everyone.

    Mr. Scary, are you joking?

    I've ridden every shimano there is from Sora up to DuraAce. I have never ridden anything nicer than Record though. However, I'm not saying that the record is nicer than the dura ace either. They are just different. The truth is as long as everything is tuned properly all components work great. The biggest plus with Campy is how long it lasts and how long it stays tuned. Oh, and the fact that carbon looks sweet!

    BTW..I have shimano xt on my superlight and shimano tiagra on my cross bike. I am by no means anti shimano. I believe that tuning is 90%, component choice is the other 10%.

    The reason I chose Campy Record on this bike is because I built this bike to last.



    Uhhhhhhhhh..........honestly, I don't think it says anything. Pro's ride what they are paid to ride.
    agreed. I've heard stories of people riding a set of campy components for DECADES. Look on ebay at how many people are selling 25 year old campy components, and then go try to find a 10 year old set of dura ace components. Plus any small part that breaks on a campy shifter can be replaced, while on a shimano you have to replace the whole shifter.

    That being said, they both work great, I think it comes down to how long you want it to last, and which method of shifting you prefer. Personally, I hate the shimano system, and prefer having the campy style shifters.

  9. #9
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    Very Sweet! I truely love it.

    Your cassette looks a little large for campy derailer? What's the size, 12x32? Is that a compact cranks? Talk to me cause I may do the same for my roadbike.

  10. #10
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    Reputation: LowCel's Avatar
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    Thanks. The cassette is a Campy Chorus 13-29. The crankset is a standard 53x39. I am hoping to be able to comfortably switch to a 12-25 cassette this year. I may have to shoot for a 13-26 though. There are some nice climbs in WV where the 29 comes in handy for me right now.

  11. #11
    Jed Peters
    Reputation: Zonic Man's Avatar
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    Dude, what's up with IF and their "fitting" lately? I think they're leaving it up too much to the consumer, and not letting shops make intelligent choices on fit/design.

    (I.E. the fact that this bike is a full-custom and has a WAY too short headtube for the stem that you chose to run.)

  12. #12
    Trail rider and racer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    Dude, what's up with IF and their "fitting" lately? I think they're leaving it up too much to the consumer, and not letting shops make intelligent choices on fit/design.

    (I.E. the fact that this bike is a full-custom and has a WAY too short headtube for the stem that you chose to run.)
    I agree that some of the IF's as of late have featured bizzare stems lengths, spacers and massive posts, but how you can draw a conclusion about the stem and WAY too short headtube is confusing. A 110mm stem seems normal for that sort of TT I would have thought. You don't normally go to 90mm stems on such bikes. And the diff between a 100 and 110mm is marginal on a roadie.
    Trev!

  13. #13
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    Zonic, not real sure what you are talking about. The bike fits perfect. I had this bike modeled pretty much off of a previous bike that I had. I just had a few changes made to the chain stays and the head tube length.

    The bike is awesome on climbs and quick rides. It is also very comfortable on century's. I'm not sure what more I could ask for.

    Also, if you check my original post you will see that the pedals, handlebar, and stem have been replaced since that picture was taken. The stem that was on for the picture was a 120. I had to use it since I was still waiting for my carbon oversized handlebar to arrive. The picture has a regular specialized bar and stem on it that I borrowed from the shop until my warranty Kestrel bar came in.

    As for IF not letting shops make intelligent decisions I'm not sure that applies here. I am the guy at the shop that would make the decisions on fit and the customer of this particular bike. Personally, I think the guy that set the bike up for me did a pretty good job, especially since there is nothing about the frame that I would change.

    Here is a crappy pic of it showing the new stem. Not sure if you will be able to tell any difference though. I am planning on switching to a 100 this season though. Mainly just so that it will a little more comfortable when staying in the drops while riding in pace lines.


  14. #14
    NM
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    Cool that your fish matches the bike.

  15. #15
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    LOL, I think the fish is trying to figure out how to get to the bike so that she can eat it.

  16. #16
    Jed Peters
    Reputation: Zonic Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor!
    I agree that some of the IF's as of late have featured bizzare stems lengths, spacers and massive posts, but how you can draw a conclusion about the stem and WAY too short headtube is confusing. A 110mm stem seems normal for that sort of TT I would have thought. You don't normally go to 90mm stems on such bikes. And the diff between a 100 and 110mm is marginal on a roadie.
    Well, when you order a custom bike, they ask you the type of stem you want to run (or should).

    If they know that, they know your saddle height based (roughly) on your measurements, etc. etc., there should be NO spacers (or, actually, 1-1.5cm of spacers is okay) or very few mm's.

    The frame SHOULD have been built for you accordingly. That means no big stack with a short headtube.

    It took me sending back my bike to get the correct headtube length on my IF and getting a new one. To Indy's credit, they were TOTALLY amenable to getting me set up in the correct fit, and were fantastic guys to work with.

  17. #17
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    Glad to hear that they worked with you.

    I got the exact frame that I wanted so I can't complain. (Personal opinion) I would rather have a few spacers than a tall head tube. That's just one of my pet peaves, I don't like looking down at tall head tubes. I can't explain it though.

    That's the great thing about having a custom frame built, it's built just how the rider wants it.

  18. #18
    Jed Peters
    Reputation: Zonic Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowCel
    Glad to hear that they worked with you.

    I got the exact frame that I wanted so I can't complain. (Personal opinion) I would rather have a few spacers than a tall head tube. That's just one of my pet peaves, I don't like looking down at tall head tubes. I can't explain it though.

    That's the great thing about having a custom frame built, it's built just how the rider wants it.
    You don't have to have the tall headtube extension to get a frame that fits.

    You have too much post showing IMHO, so I would have increased the seattube height, as well as the headtube height, and just made the tt a bit taller. This way you have a frame that is more porportional.

  19. #19
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    I understand where you are coming from. A lot of people feel the way that you do about the seatpost and the stem height. I just really like compact geometry.

    I guess it all boils down to the fact that I am very happy with it, which is pretty important since I am the one that rides it and and paid for it.
    Last edited by LowCel; 12-27-2004 at 08:50 AM.

  20. #20
    strip it down
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    reality

    That is a seriously sweet bike.....I was very close to hooking one up at one point. The color is really nice...... I wouldn't really waste time having a disussion on "fit"........no offense to Zonic...but almost everything he said is untrue.......ok maybe not "untrue" but just "theory and opinion".......there are at least 3 major ways of fitting a bike, and various little ideas and attitudes in between...so it's really a waste of time discussing it. As soon as you think you can just look at someone else's bike and come to the conclusion that it doesn't fit right well......then you are delusional.....or a know it all..which could go hand in hand.......same goes for riding style. Just watch the pro-peloton for a few minutes....and tell me what you come up with...anyway...... I'm bored at work so I thought I'd throw in some objectivity....which is really lacking on this board sometimes.
    There's nothing like having the world under your wheels......

  21. #21
    Jed Peters
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tbonius
    That is a seriously sweet bike.....I was very close to hooking one up at one point. The color is really nice...... I wouldn't really waste time having a disussion on "fit"........no offense to Zonic...but almost everything he said is untrue.......ok maybe not "untrue" but just "theory and opinion".......there are at least 3 major ways of fitting a bike, and various little ideas and attitudes in between...so it's really a waste of time discussing it. As soon as you think you can just look at someone else's bike and come to the conclusion that it doesn't fit right well......then you are delusional.....or a know it all..which could go hand in hand.......same goes for riding style. Just watch the pro-peloton for a few minutes....and tell me what you come up with...anyway...... I'm bored at work so I thought I'd throw in some objectivity....which is really lacking on this board sometimes.
    No one in the pro peleton has that many spacers. Fact.

    You can tell quite a bit looking at a spacer stack and the amount of seatpost one is showing.

  22. #22
    Cold. Blue. Steel.
    Reputation: OneGearGuy's Avatar
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    think about it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    No one in the pro peleton has that many spacers. Fact.
    no sh!t, captain obvious. no one in the pro peleton pays for their equipment, or maintains it. when you cut your steerer tube off, it's gone. and you cannot go back to a taller position without buying a new fork. pros can switch around for FREE. IMO, if you don't keep a bit of extra steerer, you are making a bad mistake when it comes to future adjustability. just because your bike is custom doesn't mean you won't need to make some changes down the road...
    hop off your high horse and try to understand that this guy is an experienced rider and shop rat- and this is not his first bike and this is how he likes it. now go out and ride!

    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    You can tell quite a bit looking at a spacer stack and the amount of seatpost one is showing.
    obviously, you can't.

    sweet bike, low cel. wish i had one just like it, but with a compact FSA crankset...
    makes a 12-25 cassette really great for the mountains (i live in Asheville, NC).
    Spinning and Grinning...

  23. #23
    strip it down
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    reality

    One again....everything you just said is completely untrue.....do I need to spend a second on the web a show you photos of pro bikes? Do I need to waste my time, and your's doing this? Sure you can find bikes that "visually" look perfect...no spacers...perty saddle height etc....., and I'll find a bike that contradicts you.

    Let me ask you some questions.
    Do you have a magic spacer stack height measurement?.......Cause I know for a "fact" that many in the pro peloton have spacers.....so you know the exact measurments? Is that what you're telling me? Is....let's say 1 inch ok (for sake of argument) but if you go hmmmm 1 1/4 inch.....beep ... you've entered the "your bike doesn't fit zone"???? Is this what you're telling me? Where did you get this information from.... Newtons Law of Fitting?
    Look man....I'm not trying to insult you...but sometimes objective reality has to be introduced. You CANNOT possible know whether a bike fits a person by just looking at their bike champ...it cannot be done.... I know you really want to be the guru on this...I know you really want to be right....but don't kid yourself.

    You want to know the real secret to how to fit someone on a bike?.........ask them how it feels......

    It is completely possible for two people with the exact same measurments to get on a bike, and one of them not like it. ... There are so many variables regarding things as subtle as conformation.......how flexible a person is? That's a great variable......top tube length will be quite different between a flexible person vs. a person who is not.... Some people have crazy long legs in proportion to their arms or torso...which could very possibly make their seat post visually seem askew to their top tube........I COULD GO ON AND ON........so let's not argue...IF you have an opinion fine...but at least realize that it is just an opinion, and there are too many professionals and laymen alike that will find fault with your ideas.





    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    No one in the pro peleton has that many spacers. Fact.

    You can tell quite a bit looking at a spacer stack and the amount of seatpost one is showing.
    There's nothing like having the world under your wheels......

  24. #24
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    Thanks everyone.

    OneGearGuy, are you doing the Fontana Icycle Race by any chance?

  25. #25
    simply me
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    While there is no 'magic' spacer height, you should note that most (all) carbon fork manufacturers recommend not going higher that 3cm. The stack height on the bike looks like it is at that limit. This not only provides for a more flexy front end but also limits just how much higher the bars can go.

    To lifit the bars any higher would require a + rise stem and when combined with a spacer stack of 3cm just says 'my bike is too small'... No problems going lower with the bars, but an experienced shop rat/rider will know just what drop they can handle and have a frame designed around this fact. It would be usual for a correctly fitted bike to initially have a spacer stack of around 1- 1.5 cm so you can go both higher and lower without a lot of effort.

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