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  1. #1
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    Ibis Mojo SL - Black & White

    Alright, time to post my ride here. The aim has been to build the bike as durable as possible without any performance compromises, while keeping the weight to a minimum. Hence, all-steel XT cassette, steel one-piece rotors, no carbon cranks (my local trails are really rocky and I get plenty of rock strikes), tires with reinforced sidewalls and so on. Titanium or aluminium bolts throughout. It would be easy to shave some more weight if I wanted to, but not without taking away some performance or longevity.








    Frame: Ibis Mojo SL size M - 2214.2 g
    Shock: DT Swiss XR Carbon - 186.7 g
    Fork: Rock Shox Revelation Solo Air (140 mm, 185.5 mm steer tube, incl star nut) - 1651.4 g
    Headset: Cane Creek IS110 integrated - 93.2 g
    Handlebar: NewUltimate EVO riser bar (700 mm) - 128.0 g
    Grips: ESI Extra Chunky (cut to 100 mm, incl. end caps) - 65.6 g
    Stem: Extralite HyperStem (80 mm, 6°) - 69.0 g
    Seatpost: YEP Components Uptimizer ST dropper post (31,6/125 mm drop, incl. remote and cables) - 572.2 g
    Improvised dropper post mud guard: Piece of inner tube - 11.9 g
    Saddle: Tune Speedneedle (front leather worn off) - 95.2 g
    Shifter: Shimano XTR M980 (10sp) with Hope Tech matchmaker - 99.6 g
    Cable set: Shimano SIS SP-41 full length (151 cm - housing stops on frame drilled out) w. Jagwire PTFE wire (165 cm) - 68.5 g
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano XTR M986 GS (w. hollow titanium pulley bolts, titanium clamp bolt, aluminium clutch cover bolts) - 208.7 g
    Crankset: Shimano XTR M970 (170mm) with Carbon-Ti Titanium 30T (104 BCD) and Wolf Tooth 26-30T bash guard - 612.5 g
    Bottom bracket: Shimano XTR SM-BB93 (without plastic inner sleeve) - 64.7 g
    Cassette: Shimano XT M771 (11-36) - 332.8 g
    Chain: KMC X10SL DLC Black (106 links) - 232.0 g
    Pedals: Xpedo M-Force Ti 8 (including plenty of marine grease) - 218.1 g
    Front brake: Hope Technology Race EVO X2 (70.5 cm plastic hose, titanium M6 bolts, titanium brake pad pin) - 183.6 g
    Rear brake: Hope Technology Race EVO X2 (plastic hose, titanium M6 bolts, titanium brake pad pin) - 206.7 g
    Rear brake adapter: Shimano SM-MA90-R160P/S w. titanium M6 bolts - 20.4 g
    Brake disc front: Avid HS1 160 mm - 102.0 g
    Brake disc bolts front: 6 x titanium - 7.7 g
    Brake disc rear: Avid HS1 160 mm - 98.6 g
    Brake disc bolts front: 6 x Hope titanium - 7.7 g
    Front rim: Edge Composites XC 26" 28h - 350.0 g
    Rim strip: Stan NoTubes 21 mm yellow tape (1 full turn) - 5.6 g
    Spokes: 28 x Sapim CX-Ray black (250/252 mm) - 117.3 g
    Nipples: 28 x Proprietary Enve brass nipples - 21.2 g
    Front hub: Carbon-Ti X-Hub SL 28h (15 mm axle) - 108.1 g
    Thru axle: Rock Shox Maxle Stealth - 38.0 g
    Rear rim: Edge Composites XC 26" 28h - 351.0 g
    Rim strip: Stan NoTubes 21 mm yellow tape (1 full turn) - 5.6 g
    Spokes: 28 x Sapim CX-Ray black (250/252 mm) - 117.7 g
    Nipples: 28 x Proprietary Enve brass nipples - 21.2 g
    Rear hub: Chris King ISO 28h (135x10 mm Thru) - 325.8 g
    Thru bolt: DT Swiss RWS 135x10 mm - 68.4 g
    Front tyre (1): Schwalbe Magic Mary SnakeSkin TrailStar 26x2.35" - 790.0 g
    Rear tyre (1): Schwalbe Hans Dampf SnakeSkin PaceStar 26x2.35" - 741.0 g
    Front tyre (2): Schwalbe Nobby Nic SnakeSkin TrailStar 26x2.35" - 654.0 g
    Rear tyre (2): Schwalbe Nobby Nic SnakeSkin PaceStar 26x2.35" - 641.0 g
    Front tube: Schwalbe EVO Tube 26" - 60.6 g
    Rear tube: Schwalbe EVO Tube 26" - 61.9 g

    Sum with tire (1): 10 728 g
    Sum with tire (2): 10 499 g
    Last edited by Crossmaxx; 06-15-2016 at 01:39 PM.

  2. #2
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    So you don't use carbon cranks because of rock strikes yet you use a carbon frame ?!!! That has to be saved .

    You could make that bike lighter without compromising anything . Take a course in design work and start learning how to build and machine parts .

    Also you are using a medium frame - that's cheating !!!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by karimian5 View Post
    So you don't use carbon cranks because of rock strikes yet you use a carbon frame ?!!! That has to be saved .

    You could make that bike lighter without compromising anything . Take a course in design work and start learning how to build and machine parts .
    This might come as a surprise to someone who isn't familiar with trail riding, but the ratio of crank arm-to-frame contact with rocks and other obstacles must be at least 100-to-1. And besides, I have full confidence in my carbon frame being able to take a beating, so I really couldn't worry less about it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossmaxx View Post
    This might come as a surprise to someone who isn't familiar with trail riding, but the ratio of crank arm-to-frame contact with rocks and other obstacles must be at least 100-to-1. And besides, I have full confidence in my carbon frame being able to take a beating, so I really couldn't worry less about it.
    Your frame will take a battering on the downtube and the chainstay from rock strikes from the chainring and the front wheel .For someone who claims to ride the trails you really haven't thought this one through very well . Also a carbon frame is a much larger mass than the cranks so by logic will be more vulnerable to rock strikes and in a crash . If your bike was lighter I'd be more impressed .

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by karimian5 View Post
    Your frame will take a battering on the downtube and the chainstay from rock strikes from the chainring and the front wheel .For someone who claims to ride the trails you really haven't thought this one through very well . Also a carbon frame is a much larger mass than the cranks so by logic will be more vulnerable to rock strikes and in a crash . If your bike was lighter I'd be more impressed .
    I believe what Crossmaxx was trying to say was a crank strike on the downward rotation of the cranks caused by rocks sticking out from the ground, not loose rocks being kicked up by the front wheel. Not to mention the cranks are much closer to the trail at any point they aren't 180*.

    Crossmaxx: For a 140-150mm bike with a dropper post and nothing overly exotic that is a damn good weight, nice build. Happy trails.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deviant_MechE View Post
    I believe what Crossmaxx was trying to say was a crank strike on the downward rotation of the cranks caused by rocks sticking out from the ground, not loose rocks being kicked up by the front wheel. Not to mention the cranks are much closer to the trail at any point they aren't 180*.

    Crossmaxx: For a 140-150mm bike with a dropper post and nothing overly exotic that is a damn good weight, nice build. Happy trails.
    You can get crank boots that go at the end of the arms to protect them . They seem to work for everyone else .

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by karimian5 View Post
    You can get crank boots that go at the end of the arms to protect them . They seem to work for everyone else .
    That is true, however another point to look at is carbon is not suited for multiple impacts in the same area. While crank boots may help dissipate them, there is still a heck of a lot of forces in a concentrated area. Oh and what happens in the (admittidly a rare but still possible) event the impact is above the crank boot?

  8. #8
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    Beautiful bike! Love it. I'm a fan of weigh conscious builds that are rideable.

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    Thanks Steven, that's the whole idea of this concept.

    Regarding carbon cranks with boots on, sure, that would be an alternative, but I think that repeated strikes will not be kind on carbon cranks even with boots on. It seems to be not too uncommon with carbon cranks (both Sram and RaceFace) that the pedal inserts come loose from the crank arm itself. Besides, there isn't a whole lot of weight saving in it if I would change my M970 cranks for a Next SL with crank boots and wanted to keep my bash guard.

  10. #10
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    Okay, well first, this is a pretty awesome build. So, honestly you haven't got many areas left to improve given that you don't want to sacrifice the bike's current "awesomeness." One idea though.... You could consider losing the bash guard on the front crainring. I used to run one forever, but finally ditched it. Just gotta be a little more careful going over logs and stuff. Other than that, I could give my two cents on the whole next sl thing. Ive seen a few of those come into my shop pretty beat up, even with the caps. But haven't seen one crack yet. They're surprisingly pretty resilient. Also, raceface has a 3 year warrenty on those guys. And they're generally pretty good with their warrenty. Just don't deal with them personally if the cranks break. Have your LBS handle the warrenty cuz normally we can kinda spin it all in your favor. Alot of times these dealers would rather have a loyal shop. Anyway, I also understand your point that there really isn't a massive weight savings anyway, so I get where your coming from.

    Only other things that could save you maybe a couple grams. Couldn't really tell if you were shifted into the 36 cog in the rear in your pic or the one right under. But if so, just by looking at the bend on your RD, you may be able to get away with removing 2 links from your chain. Basically, as long as you still get the chain following a bend, you're okay. Worth a shot anyway to see how it performs, if it doesn't cooperate just throw them back in . All it would cost would be 3 10 speed pins. Plus we'd learn how much 1 KMC link weighed lol. And last, but not least, you could get rid of those presta valve caps lol.

  11. #11
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    Nice bike, Crossmax. Even better trails--I'm always happiest when riding among trees.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCase View Post
    Okay, well first, this is a pretty awesome build. So, honestly you haven't got many areas left to improve given that you don't want to sacrifice the bike's current "awesomeness." One idea though.... You could consider losing the bash guard on the front crainring. I used to run one forever, but finally ditched it. Just gotta be a little more careful going over logs and stuff. Other than that, I could give my two cents on the whole next sl thing. Ive seen a few of those come into my shop pretty beat up, even with the caps. But haven't seen one crack yet. They're surprisingly pretty resilient. Also, raceface has a 3 year warrenty on those guys. And they're generally pretty good with their warrenty. Just don't deal with them personally if the cranks break. Have your LBS handle the warrenty cuz normally we can kinda spin it all in your favor. Alot of times these dealers would rather have a loyal shop. Anyway, I also understand your point that there really isn't a massive weight savings anyway, so I get where your coming from.

    Only other things that could save you maybe a couple grams. Couldn't really tell if you were shifted into the 36 cog in the rear in your pic or the one right under. But if so, just by looking at the bend on your RD, you may be able to get away with removing 2 links from your chain. Basically, as long as you still get the chain following a bend, you're okay. Worth a shot anyway to see how it performs, if it doesn't cooperate just throw them back in . All it would cost would be 3 10 speed pins. Plus we'd learn how much 1 KMC link weighed lol. And last, but not least, you could get rid of those presta valve caps lol.
    Thanks for your input and complements, Alex. Regarding the bash: it's already saved my chain/chainring on a few occasions, so it has proven its worth to me. The pictures of the trail above may not look like it, but some of the trails here are really rocky, and combined with a pretty low BB height on the Mojo, I think it makes sense to keep it on. It also allows me to force myself over fallen trees lying across the trail without worrying about the chain and chainring. I would hate to be stranded with a bent chain link out on the trail.

    The thing is, the bash "only" adds 53.2 g while running it on the M970 crank arms as the spider is integrated with the crank. However, should I go for the Next SL, I would need to ride their 3x spider in order to be able to run the bash, and that kills a lot of the weight savings compared to running a spiderless chainring.
    Current crank setup looks like this:
    Shimano XTR FC-M970 (170 mm) crank arms: 522.1 g
    WolfTooth 26-30T Bash guard: 53.2 g
    Carbon-Ti 30T 104 BCD chainring: 33.3 g
    Carbon-Ti alu chainring bolts: 3.9 g
    Shimano XTR SM-BB93 Bottom Bracket (w/o inner sleeve): 64.7 g
    Sum: 677.2 g

    Running the RaceFace Next SL with a 3x spider would sum up to:
    Race Face Next SL (170 mm/ 68/73 BB width): 372 g to 380 g
    Crank arm boots: 16 g
    3x spider: 60 g
    WolfTooth 26-30T Bash guard: 53.2 g
    Carbon-Ti 30T 104 BCD chainring: 33.3 g
    Carbon-Ti alu chainring bolts: 3.9 g
    Bottom Bracket: ? I've heard the Race Face BB is crap, so I would probably go for the Hope 30 mm BSA that weighs 102 g
    Sum: 640-648 g.

    Regarding a shorter chain: Yes, that picture is with the chain on the 36T cog, so there might be a room for removing 2 links. However, there is some chain growth when the suspension moves through its 140 mm travel, so I'd rather stay on the safe side. The 2 links would remove 4.4 grams. Adding and subtracting links is a good way of weakening the chain I think, so I'd rather just keep it as is.

    Again, thanks for the input!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdparrish View Post
    Nice bike, Crossmax. Even better trails--I'm always happiest when riding among trees.
    Cheers, if you ever visit Stockholm, send me a PM and I'll show you around

  14. #14
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    That's a bit of a trip from Idaho, U.S.A. How long is your riding season there? I'd imagine you only get a few months.

    I've been on the trails for a month, but we're still fighting winter and only the lower trails are dry. Most of the good stuff is still muddy or under snow. February was warmish, but March has been relatively cold and wet.

    On that note, I'm off for a ride before the afternoon rains hit.

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    Well, I'm riding all year long, but during January and February my milage was pretty poor due to snowy trails. But the trails have been snow-free for two weeks now, and in winter the snow didn't arrive until end of December, so if you don't want to ride in the snow, I'd say you can ride the trails during 9-10 months.

    Here are a few more pics of the bike, taken today:



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossmaxx View Post
    Well, I'm riding all year long, but during January and February my milage was pretty poor due to snowy trails. But the trails have been snow-free for two weeks now, and in winter the snow didn't arrive until end of December, so if you don't want to ride in the snow, I'd say you can ride the trails during 9-10 months.
    That's surprising. Cue the cliche about the "typical geographically ignorant American," but I assumed you had very long winters in Stockholm. I think ours here in Idaho might be longer.

    I suppose if you push it, you can ride the trails here for about that long, but most years, the trails turn muddy/greasy by late October, so if you want to ride them, you have to ride them in the morning, when they're frozen.

    In certain cases, you can still ride a few trails near town after snows, but it must be a dry snow, it must stay below freezing, even during the day, and the snow must be packed down. If all of those conditions are true, then traction is surprisingly good and you can climb all but the steepest spots.

    This time last year, nearly every trail was open because it was so warm and dry and winter was so mild. But that's not the historical norm.

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    Well, I would guess that the winter in Stockholm is probably longer then in Idaho. But Stockholm normally don't get much snow, so you're able to ride pretty much year round even though it's pretty darn cold. Around 20-30 degrees fahrenheit from november to march.

    The mountain range to the west gets most of the snow and leaves us with long and cold but almost snowless winters.

  18. #18
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    Not much snow? That's crazy--aren't y'all right on the Baltic? So the mountains pull the moisture out of the air before it can get to you? I never would've guessed.

    On that note, I woke up two another inch or two of snow and it's rained all day. Trails are wet again and will remain so for at least a few days.

  19. #19
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    Really like the look of the black swingarm and white front. Were you able to special order it that way from the Swedish Ibis Importer?
    Very nice build.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by xc71 View Post
    Really like the look of the black swingarm and white front. Were you able to special order it that way from the Swedish Ibis Importer?
    Very nice build.
    Cheers! Actually, the whole bike was matte carbon first, but there was a crack on the back of the seat tube and Ibis were out of matte carbon front triangles, so they offered me a white one. I really dig the combination too, even if the weightweenie in me is painfully aware of the fact that the white paint adds somewhere around 100 grams.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hdparrish View Post
    Not much snow? That's crazy--aren't y'all right on the Baltic? So the mountains pull the moisture out of the air before it can get to you? I never would've guessed.

    On that note, I woke up two another inch or two of snow and it's rained all day. Trails are wet again and will remain so for at least a few days.
    Haha! You're more than welcome to visit, and if you do, send me a PM and I'll show you around the best trails in Stockholm! This Monday, the elevated trails were bone dry and we had 12 degrees C here.

  22. #22
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    Ibis Mojo SL - Black & White-img_1131.jpg

    Now with Nobby Nics, weight: 10580 grams.

  23. #23
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    I love Nobby Nics, Crossmaxx. Great all-arounders, and relatively light for a full knobby.

    Question: do you meticulously weigh each component? If so, could you please tell me the combined weight for your XTR cranks (drive- and non-drive-side arm and spindle, plus pinch and fixing bolts) and NOT counting the chainring, bash, chainring nuts and bolts, and bottom bracket.

  24. #24
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    Of course I do! Here is the list:

    Shimano XTR FC-M970 170 mm total weight: 522.1 g
    Right crank arm: 327 g
    Left crank arm: 178.1 g
    Left crank arm bearing tension nut (incl. M3x9 titanium bolt): 6.6 g
    Yumeya left crank arm bolt (black anodized): 10.4 g (original, non-Yumeya bolt is the same weight)

  25. #25
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    Tack, Crossmaxx. You can always count on a weight weenie for a detailed response.

    I converted the SLX double that came with my bike. Your m970s appear to be 70 grams lighter, but they are hard to find and are relatively expensive. I can get a set of XTs on the cheap, but the XT cranks don't seem to be any lighter than my SLX (592 grams).

    I'm not a real weight weenie, but I'd like to one day get my 650b full suspension (140mm front and back) to under 12 kilos. We do a lot of climbing here.

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    I think the M980 crankset is more or less identical in terms of weight, so that one could be an alternative if you want a 104/64 BCD light, aluminum crank.
    Gewicht Shimano Kurbel XTR FC-M980 175mm, 68/73mm, HTII

  27. #27
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    Yup, that's indeed what I'm after--light alloy cranks with 104/64 BCD. It's not a priority, but I guess since M970s and M980s have been discontinued, buying one sooner than later would be better.

    I see the new M9000 cranks are relatively cheap, and I know they have a new, proprietary, ridiculous BCD of 96. But aftermarket rings are already available for them, so I'm wondering if that's what I should buy when I finally do upgrade my cranks. Any reason why the new "11-speed-specific" cranks wouldn't work with a 10-speed cassette? Chainline?

    Sorry for derailing your thread, btw.

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    Managed to reduce another 70 grams by replacing the standard Edge/Enve Composites rim stripe with Stans yellow tape (-25 grams), removing the neoprene chainstay protector and putting on some 3M heli tape (I will however add a thin slice of inner tube to keep it more quiet on the gnarly descents) (-15 grams), even lighter EVO tubes (new ones at 60,6 gram and 61,3 grams to replace previous ones at 67,6 and 71,5) (-17,2 grams) and replacing older frame protection with 3M heli tape (-13 grams).

    The bike weighs 10509 grams in its current state.


  29. #29
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    Very nice and well thought out build! I am in the process of a build and prefer the alloy crank like yours, but light as possible. I do have some heavier parts going on though, like a Sunrace 11/42 cassette and alloy 29er front rim and 900 gram tires. Definitely more trail bike than XC. Will refer to this build for lighter options....thanks!
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  30. #30
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    Cheers, let me know which crank you end up choosing and the weight of it. Or better still, you should post the finished bike in the ww-forum.

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    After some inspiration by xc71, I tuned the Yep Uptimizer seatpost and shaved some 30-odd grams. Excel-sheet says 10481 grams, whereas my Feedback Sports scale says 10470 grams. Pretty good correlation.





    Next up, I'll install a 150 mm air shaft (currently 140), remove the one bottomless token currently installed, cut the steer tube by 10 mm and remove a 10 mm spacer.

  32. #32
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    Nice Crossmax. Was your weight savings on the Yep post not closer to 50 grams?
    Mine was 55 grams not including the Power Cordz cable.

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    Yeah, in total it was 48 grams, butI made the change to titanium bolts already in the OP.

  34. #34
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    I love it! Good work. I will soon be posting my new HD3 in the forums!
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