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  1. #1
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    hardtail at 27.5 lbs????

    I went from fs bike to hardtail because i want a lighter and faster bike. I bought a trek 8500 frame size 17.5 and transferred the parts from my heckler to it. the build is finished and now my bike weighs 27.5 lbs. I still want it lighter so i wonder which part of my bike is causing this weight.


    frame trek 8500 size 17.5
    fork 2003 Marzocchi MX comp coil
    tires: specialized roll-x
    rim: mavic X618
    hubs: specialized stout
    crankset: shimano Hone
    stem and handlbar: Easton A70
    saddle: WTB Rocket V
    seatpost: generic alloy
    brakes: Avid mechanical disc
    brake levers: Avid
    shifter + rear der: sram x.0
    front der: shimano xt
    pedals: shimano M647
    headset: chris King

    Can anyone suggest at most two parts of the bike where I can gain the most weight saving? thanks

    Ed
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    Last edited by edsol; 07-04-2005 at 12:38 AM. Reason: better picture

  2. #2
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    The fork, but some people a are willing to not save weight there to have a Zorky, but definitely the BRAKES... get some light hydraulics like martas and save at least a pound, with better performance
    ---(cheap, light, strong)---
    pick two...

    I choose all 3!!!

  3. #3
    6x7=Dont Panic!
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    Those pedals are pretty heavy. Some stainless eggbeates would save over 300g. My guess is that the seatpost also weighs a bit, so you might be able to save a few good grams there in the future. Many recommend foam grips (I love them), bolt on skewers, and lighter tubes and tires for a cheap start. I'd say keep your tires since they handle very well in my opinion, but go ahead with the other cheap upgrades (count those as one thing) and the pedals.
    Herro prease

  4. #4
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    Most of your component are 'heavy'. 100g here, and 200g there adds up pretty quickly! go to http://weightweenies.starbike.com/listings.php and have a look there. Your forks, cranks, brakes, generic seat post, stem, bar, pedals are all starts...but unfortunately expensive! My dually weighs about 23.1pounds.

  5. #5
    Bike to the Bone...
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    I would think the fork.

    How are the hone crankset and the pedals? I want those, and want to know how they perform, I'm not that worried about weight.


    Quote Originally Posted by edsol
    I went from fs bike to hardtail because i want a lighter and faster bike. I bought a trek 8500 frame size 17.5 and transferred the parts from my heckler to it. the build is finished and now my bike weighs 27.5 lbs. I still want it lighter so i wonder which part of my bike is causing this weight.


    frame trek 8500 size 17.5
    fork 2003 Marzocchi MX comp coil
    tires: specialized roll-x
    rim: mavic X618
    hubs: specialized stout
    crankset: shimano Hone
    stem and handlbar: Easton A70
    saddle: WTB Rocket V
    seatpost: generic alloy
    brakes: Avid mechanical disc
    brake levers: Avid
    shifter + rear der: sram x.0
    front der: shimano xt
    pedals: shimano M647
    headset: chris King

    Can anyone suggest at most two parts of the bike where I can gain the most weight saving? thanks

    Ed

  6. #6
    Lactic Acid is my friend.
    Reputation: split's Avatar
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    In building a light bike, the extra weight comes from everywhere. Ryan123 is right, a few extra grams here and there really adds up. I bet the most weight is in the Hone crankset and the fork, so if you only had to pick two, that's my bet. But if you want light, don't stop there. The order I would change things on your bike would be: Cranks/BB, fork, wheels, tubes, tires, brakes, pedals, seatpost, stem, seat, handlebar, cassette, shifters/derailleurs, bottlecage, grips, bolts.

    The 8500 can be made into a respectably light racing machine. You can use my buildlist as an example, coming in at under 20 lbs.

    Bottom Bracket: American Classic Ti
    Brake Levers: XTR V
    Brakes: XTR V
    Cables: XTR
    Cassette Shimano XT (8sp)
    Chain: Sram 68
    Crankarms: Race Face Next LP
    44t
    32t
    22t
    Derlr (Front) XT
    Derlr (Rear) SRAM 9.0SL
    Fork: 2001 SID XC
    Frame: 2003 Trek 8500 17.5"
    Grips: Titec Pork Rinds (cut)
    Handlebar: Easton Monkeylite Lo-rise
    Headset: Tange Aheadset
    Hub (Front) Rolf Propel UST
    Hub (Rear) Rolf Propel UST
    Pedals: Crankbrothers Egg beaters
    Quick Releases: Norco Hex-lock skewers
    Seat Binder: Extralite
    Seat: San Marco Aspide Ti
    Seatpost: USE Alum 350mm 31.6
    Shifters: Sram 9.0SL
    Stem: FSA 120XC 105mm
    Tire (Front) Michelin Comp S Lite 2.1
    Tire (Rear): Michelin Comp S Lite 2.1
    Tubes: Performance Ultralite 650
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    Last edited by split; 07-04-2005 at 07:20 AM.

  7. #7
    Jm.
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    Most bang for the buck?

    Switch out pedals for eggbeaters.

    Seatpost for thomson.

    Saddle for something light like a selle italia flite TT, or whatever.

    Brakes for something light like martas or hope minis.


    Those could save you about about 2 pounds, that would get you on your way pretty fast.

    We built a 29lb hardtail at the bikeshop last week for someone that wants to ride pretty agressively, rhinolite rims and deore hubs, 2.3" freeride tires, etc. That weight adds up real fast.
    I know in my heart that Ellsworth bikes are more durable by as much as double. AND they are all lighter...Tony Ellsworth

  8. #8
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    i think you should invest on a nice set of wheels. something like xtr or dt 240s hubs, dt rims and wheelsmith double butted spokes. that will be light, not that expensive and very reliable. and dont forget to get light tires and tubes too.

    than look for some foam grips like ritchey wcs or titec pork rinds, race face deus crankset, eggbeaters pedals if you want lightness or shimano m540 if you want a trouble free pedal, thomson post, slr or flite tt sadle.... and keep going
    hey
    ho
    lets go!

  9. #9
    Jm.
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlos
    i think you should invest on a nice set of wheels. something

    not going to save much weight, maybe 100g TOTAL for rims, then about 40g total for butted spokes, about 40g total for the alloy nipples, and the rest will be in the hubs, but this is going to cost up the wazoo and he could use that money to change out a lot of other things and save much more weight.

    Wheels and tires is one of the areas you look at to save weight, but this guy actually has a bunch of other areas that can easily drop weight before even looking to the wheels.
    I know in my heart that Ellsworth bikes are more durable by as much as double. AND they are all lighter...Tony Ellsworth

  10. #10
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    Reba or Marathon SL fork: -400g or so
    Marta SL brakes: -300g
    240s hubs: could be -300g, hard to say with OEM hubs
    M540 pedals: -200g (eggs cut more)
    Twister Pro tires: -200g or so
    butted spokes: could be -150g if yours are straight
    Thomson post: could be -100g
    inner tubes: could be -100g
    handlebar: flatbar could be -100g
    and low-end cassettes can be heavy

  11. #11
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    nice bike

    Quote Originally Posted by split
    In building a light bike, the extra weight comes from everywhere. Ryan123 is right, a few extra grams here and there really adds up. I bet the most weight is in the Hone crankset and the fork, so if you only had to pick two, that's my bet. But if you want light, don't stop there. The order I would change things on your bike would be: Cranks/BB, fork, wheels, tubes, tires, brakes, pedals, seatpost, stem, seat, handlebar, cassette, shifters/derailleurs, bottlecage, grips, bolts.

    The 8500 can be made into a respectably light racing machine. You can use my buildlist as an example, coming in at under 20 lbs.

    Bottom Bracket: American Classic Ti
    Brake Levers: XTR V
    Brakes: XTR V
    Cables: XTR
    Cassette Shimano XT (8sp)
    Chain: Sram 68
    Crankarms: Race Face Next LP
    44t
    32t
    22t
    Derlr (Front) XT
    Derlr (Rear) SRAM 9.0SL
    Fork: 2001 SID XC
    Frame: 2003 Trek 8500 17.5"
    Grips: Titec Pork Rinds (cut)
    Handlebar: Easton Monkeylite Lo-rise
    Headset: Tange Aheadset
    Hub (Front) Rolf Propel UST
    Hub (Rear) Rolf Propel UST
    Pedals: Crankbrothers Egg beaters
    Quick Releases: Norco Hex-lock skewers
    Seat Binder: Extralite
    Seat: San Marco Aspide Ti
    Seatpost: USE Alum 350mm 31.6
    Shifters: Sram 9.0SL
    Stem: FSA 120XC 105mm
    Tire (Front) Michelin Comp S Lite 2.1
    Tire (Rear): Michelin Comp S Lite 2.1
    Tubes: Performance Ultralite 650
    wow! that's under 20lbs! fantastic. nice bike you have there. btw, what is your height? Im 5' 11.5" but I chose to get a 17.5 size trek 8500 because i really want a sloping top tube and also because I am okay with the 23.1 top tube of size 17.5

  12. #12
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    Sweet!

    Sweet!!


    Quote Originally Posted by split
    In building a light bike, the extra weight comes from everywhere. Ryan123 is right, a few extra grams here and there really adds up. I bet the most weight is in the Hone crankset and the fork, so if you only had to pick two, that's my bet. But if you want light, don't stop there. The order I would change things on your bike would be: Cranks/BB, fork, wheels, tubes, tires, brakes, pedals, seatpost, stem, seat, handlebar, cassette, shifters/derailleurs, bottlecage, grips, bolts.

    The 8500 can be made into a respectably light racing machine. You can use my buildlist as an example, coming in at under 20 lbs.

    Bottom Bracket: American Classic Ti
    Brake Levers: XTR V
    Brakes: XTR V
    Cables: XTR
    Cassette Shimano XT (8sp)
    Chain: Sram 68
    Crankarms: Race Face Next LP
    44t
    32t
    22t
    Derlr (Front) XT
    Derlr (Rear) SRAM 9.0SL
    Fork: 2001 SID XC
    Frame: 2003 Trek 8500 17.5"
    Grips: Titec Pork Rinds (cut)
    Handlebar: Easton Monkeylite Lo-rise
    Headset: Tange Aheadset
    Hub (Front) Rolf Propel UST
    Hub (Rear) Rolf Propel UST
    Pedals: Crankbrothers Egg beaters
    Quick Releases: Norco Hex-lock skewers
    Seat Binder: Extralite
    Seat: San Marco Aspide Ti
    Seatpost: USE Alum 350mm 31.6
    Shifters: Sram 9.0SL
    Stem: FSA 120XC 105mm
    Tire (Front) Michelin Comp S Lite 2.1
    Tire (Rear): Michelin Comp S Lite 2.1
    Tubes: Performance Ultralite 650

  13. #13
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    i changed the fork

    hi guys, thanks so much for all your nice suggestions. I was able to sell the MX comp fork and replaced it with a slightly used Manitou Skareb Elite and I am having a significant weight loss in my bike, its playing around 25 lbs. I just hope my weigh scale is accurate i know, i can lose some more weight in other areas but i leave that some other days. As for now, i am quite satisfied with it.

  14. #14
    Lactic Acid is my friend.
    Reputation: split's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edsol
    hi guys, thanks so much for all your nice suggestions. I was able to sell the MX comp fork and replaced it with a slightly used Manitou Skareb Elite and I am having a significant weight loss in my bike, its playing around 25 lbs. I just hope my weigh scale is accurate i know, i can lose some more weight in other areas but i leave that some other days. As for now, i am quite satisfied with it.
    Glad to hear! Soon enough, you will be hooked and that 25 lbs will keep going down given enough time. You should notice a considerable difference taking 2.5lbs off the front end. Welcome to the club.

  15. #15
    Lactic Acid is my friend.
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    Quote Originally Posted by edsol
    wow! that's under 20lbs! fantastic. nice bike you have there. btw, what is your height? Im 5' 11.5" but I chose to get a 17.5 size trek 8500 because i really want a sloping top tube and also because I am okay with the 23.1 top tube of size 17.5
    I weigh 155-ish, 5' 10.5" and think 19.5" would be too big. I like the compactness of the 17.5", easier to flick around. THe bike is actually my fiance's bike I built for her, but I like taking it out once in a while when she's not looking.

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