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  1. #1
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    Easton EC90 Zero carbon seatpost

    I am looking for a new carbon seat post and found some horror stories and good stories about the EC90, I want something strong and light and most importantly reliable. What have you guys experienced with this seat post I know a lot of you run them.

    looking at the latest model like the pic :

  2. #2
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    Just get yourself a Thomson Masterpiece. It may have a few more grams...but its worth it for the strength.

  3. #3
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    I had a Thompson on my Carbon S works, I can actually tell a difference over carbon and aluminum seats posts. I also needs a 400MM seat post, Masterpieces are too short for my Litespeed build. The Thompson is very very reliable however rides harsh compared to carbon.

  4. #4
    LuizSalles
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    Quote Originally Posted by pernfilman
    I had a Thompson on my Carbon S works, I can actually tell a difference over carbon and aluminum seats posts. I also needs a 400MM seat post, Masterpieces are too short for my Litespeed build. The Thompson is very very reliable however rides harsh compared to carbon.
    I have the same problem, need a 400mm seatpost, I had a mastepiece too, but bought one EC90, because the masterpiece is too short, and my frame Gary fisher need the 400mm seatpost.....

    I´m just waiting my new frame to use the EC90.... one stumpjumper HT
    LuizSalles
    São Paulo, São Paulo
    Brazil

  5. #5
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    Got one myself. Swapped to the EC90 from a thomson Masterpiece i found the Thomson too harsh to ride with, much prefer the carbon.

    Mine is 31.6x400mm weighed 212 grams.

    Tuned it with Ti bolts and KCNC clamps and its now 183 grams.

  6. #6
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    I rode this seatpost last year. Previous to that I was riding a Thomson Masterpiece. If Thomson is the benchmark for quality and function, then the Easton met the grade - worked just as well.

    The only thing is that the portion of the seatpost that is inside the frame will get scratched up pretty good - only a concern if you plan to resell it - whereas when you pull the thomson out of the frame, it is dirty, but looks new again after a wipe.

  7. #7
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    The Eastons are pretty much bombproof as well. And they still have some tuning potential left...Titanium bolts or even clamps from KCNC lower the weight quite a bit.

    shown below:
    31,6/400: 196g
    27,2/400: 189g
    Easton EC90 tuned with KCNC clamping parts
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
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    If anyone here is using an EC90 with KCNC clamps let me know, got a question!

  9. #9
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    I have been using one for a little under a year. In 30.9, not sure the length off hand, but I would guess I cut off 3 inches, with ti hardware, it weighs 172.

  10. #10
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    nino,

    how did you achieve the carbon weaving look on cnt carbon parts?

    just water sand it?

    I love to do the same with my handle...

    thanks!


    Quote Originally Posted by nino
    The Eastons are pretty much bombproof as well. And they still have some tuning potential left...Titanium bolts or even clamps from KCNC lower the weight quite a bit.

    shown below:
    31,6/400: 196g
    27,2/400: 189g
    Easton EC90 tuned with KCNC clamping parts

  11. #11
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    That's an old EC90.

    They used to be "normal" carbon in 2006/2007 then they changed to "CNT Carbon" which is why it looks different. You can't make a CNT version look like normal carbon. Don't know why you would want too, CNT Carbon looks great!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffster
    That's an old EC90.

    They used to be "normal" carbon in 2006/2007 then they changed to "CNT Carbon" which is why it looks different. You can't make a CNT version look like normal carbon. Don't know why you would want too, CNT Carbon looks great!
    thanks Tiffster,

    i have old EC90 also, but i thought nino did something interesting with the cnt model

    i have obsolutely no complaints on its function, but i am gathering parts matching with teh rest of my bike

    btw its not finished and will change some parts when they come
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    LCW
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    how does the EC70 seatpost compare? they are blowing them out on Jenson (don't know if that's a good or bad thing.... flawed???)

    http://jensonusa.com/store/product/S...atpost+08.aspx

  14. #14
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    Ah i can see why you want a carbon look then!

    The EC70 is a bit heavier due to the clamping design. The EC90 is completely carbon aside from the bolts.

  15. #15
    LCW
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    the Easton carbon posts getting terrible reviews in the MTBR reviews section...

    is the "new" EC90 much better and rectifies people dislike about it? does it fail as much as mentioned?

  16. #16
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    I have a Easton EC90 27.2x400mm in my Cannondale Scalpel, I weight 160lb and mine Cracked like three weeks ago right in the middle........In my Hardtail Im using a Syntace P6 (sponsorship deal) and Its a great seatpost. really strong, Im supper happy with the Syntace...... I wont buy Easton Again, at least for now...

    Good Luck

  17. #17
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    I've had a 30.9 EC90 for about a year. One of the best purchases I have made. I was running it on a S-works m2 hardtail: a very stiff frame. The increase in comfort due to the seatpost was amazing (moved from a syncros aluminum). You could see the post moving back and forth significantly, and certainly feel it. It was not a subtle difference, drastic increase in comfort.

    I don't know how much of a difference it makes on my new frame, a s-works epic, but I suspect even with the rear suspension I am getting some small bump compliance out of it.

  18. #18
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    i destroyed the carbon ec90. money down the drain.

  19. #19
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    How did you destroy it? Where did it break? Did you overtighten your seat clamp or something?

  20. #20
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    it delaminated - basically bubbled. i had it on my road bike, bought it new about 4 weeks ago and installed it with a torque wrench. bike developed a creak a week or so ago and everything i tried was to no avail. tonight i went to re-lube everything including the seatpost - and noticed that the around where it clamped the the outer layer of carbon was uneven. i knew my seatpost bolt wasnt over tightened and i pushed on the nose of my saddle and the whole outer layer of carbon tore... total failure, clearly a defective product. was not pleased.

    i also have a fsa k-force carbon seatpost and it weighs more but is obviously a more substantial seatpost.

    i just dont think the ec90 is substantial enough for mountain duty - some carbon is but not the ec90.

  21. #21
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    A torque wrench?

    I've been using the EC90 at full length, 400mm, with a 73° seat angle frame for about 2 years now without a single problem.
    As long as the seat tube has tight tolerances and the post isn't clamped too tight there isn't much that could crack this post.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radical_53
    A torque wrench?

    .
    My same thoughts - again we have a failure when guys use torque wrenches....for me over all these years it has been pretty much evident that guys using torque wrenches usually have no idea/feel/experience and therefore often overtorque!!

    For me a clear case of overthightening. I know those guys using torque wrenches might think it can't be but that's as it is...as simple as that.

    BTW: You need about 20% less torque when applying grease to the threads of the bolts....and in general about HALF the torque when you use carbon-paste...

  23. #23
    LuizSalles
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    I really liked the idea, someone can tell me where to buy the KCNC clamping parts ?

    I bought one EC90 to use with a Stumpjumper and the weight reduce is very goog with this KCNC clamps, but i didn´t find anything in the net....

    If someone could help me please....

    thank´s
    LuizSalles
    São Paulo, São Paulo
    Brazil

  24. #24
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    I too would love to know where to purchase a ti bolt kit with barrel nuts for the EC90.
    Niner Jet9

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitakeng
    thanks Tiffster,

    i have old EC90 also, but i thought nino did something interesting with the cnt model

    i have obsolutely no complaints on its function, but i am gathering parts matching with teh rest of my bike

    btw its not finished and will change some parts when they come
    Have you actually riden a frame that was made in the last 5-10 years? Let me guess, you prefer the ride of carbon? Lol

    I simply cant imagine putting the kind of money you are talking about into that bike! Bike snobbery aside, you could get a bottom end specialized full suspension bike for less than 2k that will blow that bike out of the water. If you go used you could even stay around 1k.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by nino
    My same thoughts - again we have a failure when guys use torque wrenches....for me over all these years it has been pretty much evident that guys using torque wrenches usually have no idea/feel/experience and therefore often overtorque!!

    For me a clear case of overthightening. I know those guys using torque wrenches might think it can't be but that's as it is...as simple as that.

    BTW: You need about 20% less torque when applying grease to the threads of the bolts....and in general about HALF the torque when you use carbon-paste...
    i never use a torque wrench either, but Im not trying to quantify anything....

    How can you say that carbon paste cuts the torque requirement in half? That's straight up WRONG

  27. #27
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    +1

    where and how much?

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmilMick
    How can you say that carbon paste cuts the torque requirement in half? That's straight up WRONG
    You only need enough torque to keep the post from slipping in the frame, the carbon paste increases friction substantially to reduce the slippage, so you do only need about half the torque in most frames and with most seat post clamps.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  29. #29
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    You can get the parts needed from toronto cycles. I think the thomson barrels are the same size, but it may have been the syncros. You could take a measurement and email toronto, I believe the owner is Tom. He is very helpful.

  30. #30
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    I really liked my EC90 - strong, light, comfortable. But I eventually replaced it with a Joplin for obvious additional functionality.

    I did have one small complaint about the EC90 though. The back side of the post has a flat face where all the insertion marks are located. This small flat face creates a small gap between seatpost and seat tube, and become a potential entry point for water. Lots of muddy riding last winter meant lots of hosing off (no direct spray on the bearings, yada, yada), but after a couple of weeks of this I was very surprised one day when I removed a water bottle bolt and a stream of water shot out of my frame. I ended up putting a small dab of aquarium sealant (silicone) at the juncture of that face and the seat tube after that and didn't have any more problems.

    A side note to those who have trouble understanding the value of torque wrenches: If you don't understand why it's smart to use one, then you are failing to understand what it does, which is remarkable because it's a very simple concept: the torque wrench measures force like a ruler measures length, or a scale measures weight so you get a precise, consistent, accurate and correct result every time.

    Do you eyeball how much to cut off each end of your bar or do you measure it with a ruler? Do you pump up your tires until they just "feel" right or do you use a pressure gauge? Do you just toss "some" Stan's (or other sealant of choice) into your tires, or do you measure the correct amount with the little cup that comes with it?

    If a component manufacturer specifies that the bolts on their part should be tightened down "fairly tight", is the part going to be tightened the same by you, me, the guy down the street? If they specify to tighten it to 65 in-lbs, and the guy down the street and I have torque wrenches, and you don't, well, the guy down the street and I are going to have a part that is tightened the way that the manufacturer designed the part to be tightened, and you may or you may not. Good luck.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  31. #31
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    I really don´t believe in that...... I craked the seat post (made a bent) and craked the clamp bolt too (the head)......

    My easton ec 90 was slipping in the frame, I was tightening the bolt, and still slipping....

    It isn´t my first carbon seatpost, I never have this problem with slipping.... but with the EC90 ... no way,,,,

    I know about torque, because this I was so careful, tightened a little each time, and still slipping, tightened a little more and CRAKED..... the bolt head and made a bent in the seatpost.....

    I have one stumpjumper sworks M5 with one EC90 30.9mm / 400 mm and a woodman SL TI seatpost collar...

    this slipping problem is normal with EC90 ? and the seat post it´s so "fragil' ?

    I have one handlebar monkeylite and no problem with that.... I bought the seatpost because think is the same quality.....
    LuizSalles
    São Paulo, São Paulo
    Brazil

  32. #32
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    Was there any grease in the seat tube from the previous seatpost when you switched to an EC90? Anytime you get slippage on a carbon post, the use of carbon friction paste is the right solution.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    A side note to those who have trouble understanding the value of torque wrenches:
    The reason most don't use a torque wrench is as follows:

    1. We have a good feel as to what too tight is.********

    2. We only tighten enough to keep said component from slipping.


    The whole point of applying to torque to certain parts is to keep them from slipping (bars/post). What many people do is tighten slowly until the part no longer slips. This method, in conjunction with applying carbon paste, will usually result in running a torque less significantly less than the manufacturer's spec.

    For example, using carbon paste and my "feel", I can apply around 3 Nm to my carbon bars. I can do this quite consistently without a torque wrench and my bars have never slipped. For poops and giggles I sometimes check with my wrench, but I am always well under the recommended 5 Nm.

    For other components I use one all the time, like crank bolts and rotor bolts, but in those cases it's harder to detect slips and the parts are not as delicate.

    I would argue that your comparison of the wrench to the ruler is not a good one as when cutting components, the exact length is required (bars must be cut from 650 mm to 580 mm) as the user will notice if you are off by 20%. In the case of a wrench, the component is perfectly usable and safe if there is no slip at a value less than the manufacturer's spec and the user will never notice if the torque value is less than 20%.

    It's not a case of not understanding how to use a torque wrench, it's a case of not needing it for certain jobs.





    ******* of course if someone has no feel and blindly cranks down (sounds like a friend of mine ) that person should either get a wrench or let someone else do it.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by civil
    It's not a case of not understanding how to use a torque wrench, it's a case of not needing it for certain jobs.
    Did I say that you need to use a torque wrench for every fastener? Let me check...No, I didn't.

    My dumbification of why a torque wrench is a good thing is not intended to state that a torque wrench is required for every bolt that you tighten. Rather, it is a specific response to the knuckleheads who say things along the lines of "The guy using the torque wrench broke component X because he used a torque wrench." That is idiocy. The whole point of a torque wrench is that you know how much torque is being applied, so that you neither overtorque nor undertorque.

    So your headset should be adjusted to ~ 5 in-lbs. Your brake calipers to ~50 in-lbs. Your crank bolts might be in the neighborhood of 450 in-lbs. Please describe anything meaningful to me about the "feel" of each of those settings done without a torque wrench. "Okay, when you tighten your headset, just imagine that you are twisting the head off an ant - a carpenter ant, not a fire ant. When you tighten your brake calipers, imagine that you are opening a can of Planters peanuts. Honey Roasted. When you tighten your crank bolts, imagine you're tightening lug nuts on your Chevy Cavalier." Awesome.

    Is it so hard to see how a known torque value is a bit more meaningful? If you still disagree, then I encourage you to also go retro on your other units of measure. Why not measure distance using the actual length of your foot? One inch is approximately 3 kernels of corn long. And of course, there is the age-old and classic cubit for the bigger distances!

    A torque wrench is a freaking tool. The more tools that you have in your toolbox, the more you can do. Take tools out of your toolbox and your left trying to fix everything with just a hammer and a screwdriver. Unfortunately, there are way too many people out there with such toolboxes.

    That is meant figuratively.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    Did I say that you need to use a torque wrench for every fastener? Let me check...No, I didn't
    That is not what I was debating, so strike that.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    The whole point of a torque wrench is that you know how much torque is being applied, so that you neither overtorque nor undertorque.
    This is what I was debating. I will state it again, for certain parts (carbon post and bars), it is fine to undertorque as long as the part doesn't slip. This can be done easily by hand by someone who knows what they are doing.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    Your crank bolts might be in the neighborhood of 450 in-lbs. Please describe anything meaningful to me about the "feel" of each of those settings done without a torque wrench.
    Which is exactly what I stated. You obviously didn't fully read my post. I never said that crank bolts should be done by feel, I actually stated that i use a wrench on them.


    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    When you tighten your brake calipers, imagine that you are opening a can of Planters peanuts. Honey Roasted. When you tighten your crank bolts, imagine you're tightening lug nuts on your Chevy Cavalier." Awesome.
    , again, read my post. I use wrenches when doing things like cranks, brakes, etc. as I stated.


    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    Is it so hard to see how a known torque value is a bit more meaningful? If you still disagree, then I encourage you to also go retro on your other units of measure. Why not measure distance using the actual length of your foot? One inch is approximately 3 kernels of corn long.
    By now it's obvious you didn't read or understand my post. At no point did I say a wrench wasn't useful. However, some parts I use a wrench on, but on others where less torque (but enough to prevent slipping) is acceptable I go by feel.

  36. #36
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    mtb143 has the same avatar as Jerk Chicken...

    hmm...interesting.

  37. #37
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    Yeah, ok. I don't think we're actually disagreeing here. I just got off from my central thesis and vented off topic a bit, sorry. Just to clarify, my intended point was that the people who blame use of a torque wrench for overtorquing and breaking things are numnutz who don't understand that this is exactly what a torque wrench is used to prevent. Likewise, the bicycle mechanic mystics who question the validity of the tool in any case and insist that it has no place and that all should be done by feel are missing more tools than just a torque wrench. Tighten until your crystal ball says to stop. I'm doing it again, aren't I? Sorry. Hey, civil, that wasn't all aimed at you in the first place, so's you know.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    Yeah, ok. I don't think we're actually disagreeing here.
    Yeah, for the most part that's what I thought.


    Quote Originally Posted by reformed roadie
    mtb143 has the same avatar as Jerk Chicken...

    hmm...interesting.
    I actually liked jerk chicken, was sorry to see him go. But I also liked Pete's fagerlins posts so there you go

  39. #39
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    Ya that was aimed at my buddy who works on rail cars in a train yard, he likes to do up all fasteners train axle tight Needless to say he as an awesome selection of easy-outs
    Civil:What happened to Jerk Chicken?

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by reformed roadie
    mtb143 has the same avatar as Jerk Chicken...

    hmm...interesting.
    Almost the same avatar. But not. Jerk and I differ in our core fundaments.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    I really liked my EC90 - strong, light, comfortable. But I eventually replaced it with a Joplin for obvious additional functionality.

    I did have one small complaint about the EC90 though. The back side of the post has a flat face where all the insertion marks are located. This small flat face creates a small gap between seatpost and seat tube, and become a potential entry point for water. Lots of muddy riding last winter meant lots of hosing off (no direct spray on the bearings, yada, yada), but after a couple of weeks of this I was very surprised one day when I removed a water bottle bolt and a stream of water shot out of my frame. I ended up putting a small dab of aquarium sealant (silicone) at the juncture of that face and the seat tube after that and didn't have any more problems.
    Question : did you align your post's flat face with the slot in your seat tube ? It's the way it is intended, so when you close your collar it's supposed not to pinch your seatpost (see below). I have a front facing slot on my Specialized and never got any infiltration/dripping problem when I was using the EC90 zero.

    As per Easton's instructions :
    Easton carbon seat posts are constructed with Relief Area Des-ign™ (RAD), a patented Easton design feature. The relief area is a flattened section of the seat post quill that protects the post from being pinched when the seat tube collar is tightened (see Figure 2). Because the relief area does not extend the full length of the quill, it is important to make sure that your seat tube collar is positioned within the relief area. If you insert the post too far into the seat tube, you may clamp down on an unrelieved area of the quill.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome
    Question : did you align your post's flat face with the slot in your seat tube ? It's the way it is intended, so when you close your collar it's supposed not to pinch your seatpost (see below). I have a front facing slot on my Specialized and never got any infiltration/dripping problem when I was using the EC90 zero.
    Yes, alas. Frame has rear facing seat slot. Seatpost is designed with flat part facing rear. The only other option would be to run the seatpost backwards, but I don't think that would work. I'd have to look at the head closer, but I think it's only designed to face the one direction to achieve correct saddle angle. Would have preferred the seat tube slot to face the front on my frame in any case as it would be better protected from rear wheel crud spray. That's the only thing I think I'd change on that frame.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  43. #43
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    grace

    thanks to all (here and elsewhere) who never fail to take a request for information and turn it into a pissing match

    its also really great to see disputes regarding technical matters about bikes veer off into personal attacks and counter attacks...you all must be really secure with your identities

    lots of love

    PS - please respond with additional defensive attacks on me, because that is what this forum is all about, and what people really want to read

  44. #44
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    i have the EC90 on two of my xc race bikes. I love them. I am a 265# and they are strong and light for me. I have never had any problems with them and I will continue to use them on all new purchases. I have a 2010 s works 29er hard tail coming that i will put the post on to.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by tolleyman
    I too would love to know where to purchase a ti bolt kit with barrel nuts for the EC90.
    Does anyone have the specifics of these components?

  46. #46
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    so, how tight AM I supposed to tighten my quick release clamp on my seat tube when installing a carbon fiber post? are they the same for all models of CF Seatposts?

    also, what is the way to clean out all the lube thats deep inside of the seat tube from a previous aluminum post?
    RH SL Pro

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPA Rider
    thanks to all (here and elsewhere) who never fail to take a request for information and turn it into a pissing match

    its also really great to see disputes regarding technical matters about bikes veer off into personal attacks and counter attacks...you all must be really secure with your identities

    lots of love

    PS - please respond with additional defensive attacks on me, because that is what this forum is all about, and what people really want to read
    Oh, the irony. You do realize that you've just done exactly what you are complaining about, right? 1) veer off into new topic "discussion about the nature of the discussion", and 2) chastisement/personal attack of others.

    I hear you though, and normally I'm right there with you about how these things go. I'm just torqued over torque wrench nonsense, and that's my excuse. Seriously though, your post cracks me up. Classic pot and kettle routine.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  48. #48
    Church of the Wheel
    Reputation: mtb143's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by louisssss
    so, how tight AM I supposed to tighten my quick release clamp on my seat tube when installing a carbon fiber post? are they the same for all models of CF Seatposts?

    also, what is the way to clean out all the lube thats deep inside of the seat tube from a previous aluminum post?
    I don't know how to put a torque wrench onto a quick release seat clamp. In any case, that's probably not the right answer anyway. Do this: apply some carbon prep type goo, and then tighten until the seatpost stays put without slipping. The carbon prep does two things: it increases friction so your parts stay put better with less clamping force required, and it also prevents galvanic corrosion between carbon and metal, which can cause your post to get frozen inside your frame. As for a way to clean lube from deep in your seat tube, maybe try putting a rag over a bottle brush?
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  49. #49
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    Yes, alas. Frame has rear facing seat slot. Seatpost is designed with flat part facing rear. The only other option would be to run the seatpost backwards, but I don't think that would work. I'd have to look at the head closer, but I think it's only designed to face the one direction to achieve correct saddle angle. Would have preferred the seat tube slot to face the front on my frame in any case as it would be better protected from rear wheel crud spray. That's the only thing I think I'd change on that frame.
    Is there a Backwards / forwards to the post? Seems like it wouldn't matter too much, as the head is not really angled
    S-Works all the bikes!
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  50. #50
    Come on, dare me!
    Reputation: Jerome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshS
    Is there a Backwards / forwards to the post? Seems like it wouldn't matter too much, as the head is not really angled
    If I'm not mistaken, the flat part must be aligned with the slot in your seat tube so that it does not pinch the seatpost. And if I remember well, you can reverse the cradle pieces to use it « reversed ».

    Jerome

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