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  1. #1
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    Hope Best place to take weight off my Cannondale for Endurance racing (Iron Bike - Brazil)

    Hello folks.

    I have a Cannondale F300 2003 hardtail,
    - CAAD2 frame
    - Manitou Six Elite Fork (2002)
    - SUN CR18 rims with shimano HB-RM15 hubs
    - Hutchinson Scorpion tires
    - LX front derraileur
    - standard Deoro rear derraileur
    - crappy alivio shifters/breaks and so on
    - dunno crankset brand, prolly cannondale

    Anyhow, I have quite a bit of $ to spend to make this baby ready for Iron Bike 2004, which is in September here in Brazil. (2 days, 80 km each very hilly trails). I suppose then I will be doing Enduro/Trail (not XC, right?). However, don't plan to spend more than US$ 1500 on replacement components for this bike, as this is my first season, and I really think a killer bike with an amateur driver just doesn't look too good.

    The bike weighs in at 27 pounds (almost 13 kg) at the moment - however, this is not accurate, as I weighed it with a standard digital scale for lard asses. I would like to get it down to 22 pounds (10 kg), or less, if possible.

    I'm 5,10 (182 cm), weigh 79-80kg (roughtly 176 pounds). However, I have a big butt - so I need comfort in this area. I want a light bike, but it also has to be comfortable, as Iron Bike + all other races I will be taking will be endurance races. It has to be light AND comfortable.

    I heard the best places to loose weight from a bike are:
    - wheelsets + tires
    - frontal fork/suspension
    - saddle
    - crankshaft

    things to take into account:
    - very much like rapid-fire triggers.
    - its got an 8 gear cassete right now, I wish to turn it into a 9 geared baby, either with XT or XTR rear derraileur

    Any help would be appreciated!!!!


    Here are a few pics of the bike.



  2. #2
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    xtr crankset m960 crankset or somehting cheaper $320
    lx shifters 25 or (xt for like 45)
    xt rear derailleur $45
    Avid v-brake system, brakes and levers (100$)
    xt chain $20
    fox or marzocchi fork(since its endurance) $400
    new wheelsetking rear? / hugi wheelset/ older 2003/2003 crossmax(not sl)) 400$
    tires, lots of kinds $65
    saddle: $60
    new grips: $10
    pedals: $40 (got shoes?)

    $ to spare (sure someone else can come up with somehting)

  3. #3
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    saddle and seat post....

    Many things could be done.
    We don't know how much money you have tpo spend.
    MOST importantly this is an endurance race.
    Anything XTR will be great.

    Saddle, get the WTB rocket V Stealth.
    Seat post, Thomson Elite
    Good knobby tires and THICK tubes.
    Electrical tape/duct tape (the silver tape). Wrap it around your seat post.
    ENDURANCE is the main thing! You don't want to change flats in the mud or rain.
    Bring a BIG bottle of lube.
    Too much may be too much.
    Not enough will make you a loser.

  4. #4
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtb_biker
    xt chain $20
    Yuk. You like fumbling with pins? SRAM PC99 Hollow pin. Stronger and lighter and more user friendly.

    You can get good V-bakes sets on Ebay.

  5. #5
    Seriously ?
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    I personally would think twice before spending US$1,500 in this bike. I would prefer to keep riding it the way it is and buy a whole new bike with the money later - if you can get a bike from US without paying customs 1,500 can get you some pretty good stuff.

    A specialized Stumpjumper M4 Hardtail with a Fox Float RL (lockout)fork retails for US$1,120 (complete bike). For about US$350-400 more you buy a lightweight wheelset and voila, you just got yourself a killer racing bike. Now you can just sell your canondale to help cover the import duties. You can probably get around R$1,500 or 1,700 (reais) for it.

    Other good parts that are light yet durable and not super expensive: Maxm Isogride carbon flat bar and a Ritchey Pro stem

    XTR cranks are nice, but are you willing to pay $100 for a replacement big ring down the road ? (probably more expensive there in Brasil). XT is a pretty good upgrade over the ones you have.

    Boa sorte

    Gui

  6. #6
    Zippy, the wonder bike
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    Have to agree with the above poster, as much as I like Cannondales. I had a 02 F1000 and from my experiance they are light, fast bikes, but they beat you up pretty bad too. Mine was a CAAD 5 so yours might ride a little softer, not sure. But for an endurance race a softtail or full suspension would work better.

  7. #7
    Trying to find Flow
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    not a good use of funds

    "Anyhow, I have quite a bit of $ to spend to make this baby ready for Iron Bike 2004, which is in September here in Brazil. (2 days, 80 km each very hilly trails). I suppose then I will be doing Enduro/Trail (not XC, right?). However, don't plan to spend more than US$ 1500 on replacement components for this bike, as this is my first season, and I really think a killer bike with an amateur driver just doesn't look too good. "



    $1500? I'm just guessing, but I'd say that's about twice as much as you paid for that bike. I really wouldn't spend that kind of money to upgrade that frame. If it were me, I'd sell the bike, take the $1500 and whatever I managed to get for that current bike, and pick up a good used rig. Use whatever money left over to upgrade wheels. In terms of comfort, particularly with an aluminum hardtail, I'd also recommend a suspension seatpost for an ultra endurance race - either Rock Shox or USE. Some nice large volume and cushy tires would be a good idea too.

    Something like these maybe?

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...category=27947

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...category=27947

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...category=27947

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...category=27947

  8. #8
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    Agreed with

    the above posts before I read them. Don't sink too much money into that bike. Upgrading to a better bike would be a better idea.

    San

  9. #9
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    well, since im from brazil too i know that buying complete bikes from ebay is really expensive, and used parts are not allowed to enter the country. our import duties are really expensive, 60% of taxes....

    but the iron biker is not a endurance racing, its more like a longer xc race, fast pace, long uphills and fast downhills. this year was around 80km first day and the second day was like 45km.

    i have some sugestions that are easily avaliable here;

    -xtr/dtrevolution/x517/alloy nipples wheelset
    -2003 xt crankset with bb
    -egg beater pedals
    -slr saddle
    -ritchey wcs or titec pork rinds grips
    -easton ct2 or maxm or fsa carbon flat bars
    -thomson post
    -ritchey pro stem
    -sram 9.0 vbrakes
    -sram x9 shifters and rear derailleur
    -sram 9.0 levers
    -xt cassette
    -spz rockster s-works tires
    -maxxis flyweight tubes
    -sid race or team fork
    hey
    ho
    lets go!

  10. #10
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    Carlos & Spiff,

    I don't know if you guys are Brazilian, or if you are just foreigners living in Brazil. Anyway, thanks for all the info. It seems as though I got ripped off by my bike shop though. They sold me that bike new for R$ 2700 - which is almost US$ 1000 for a bike that is retailed in the US for little over half that ammount.

    Anyhow, I have a friend in the UK that is coming to Brazil in April, and could bring me something. I wanted to know from you guys:

    1) Do you know if there are any problems if he would bring a brand new bike, or a second hand bike for me? Could he just say its his bike and he's bringing it to race here, or would they write down the serial number of the bike and make sure he would bring it back to Europe when he goes back?

    2) Do you know what are the rules for foreigners that come to Brazil on vacation when they bring stuff over? Is it the same US$ 500 max + everything over that they charge 50% tax?

    Carlos, Iron Bike for me is like an objective I've set in my mind that I REALLY want to do, and I would like to do it well. My objective is not to reach a good position - its just to manage to finish it well

    For XC racing, do you think a softtail is better than a hardtail? What kind of ideal bike setup would you consider for Iron Bike here in Brazil? If I ask my friend to buy me a bike in the UK, I might be able to get something really good... like $1500 - $2000, so considering you know Iron Bike, it would be really nice to get your point of view about this.

    Take care and thanks for all the help everyone!

  11. #11
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    im from brazil but im speaking in english because its a american site and everybody have the right to understand what i type here.

    when i say the iron biker is not a endurance race its because the distance is not that long but the pace is real fast and the course is killer too. you will need a fast bike, a light bike with fast acceleration. you should get light wheels, light tires, light tubes... a fast bike is a great help on that race.

    the parts i listed before will be perfect to any xc race, including the ironbiker. and believe me, with the upgrades i posted before, your bike will be much better than 80% of the rest of the crowd. just remember to train right, not only hard.

    the price of your bike is fair here in brazil, in the usa everything is way cheaper for sure, and cannondales are one of the most expensive brands here in brazil. go to the receita federal website, there you can read all the rules about import duties.

    if you prefer you can email me.
    hey
    ho
    lets go!

  12. #12
    Seriously ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronBiker
    Carlos & Spiff,

    I don't know if you guys are Brazilian, or if you are just foreigners living in Brazil. Anyway, thanks for all the info. It seems as though I got ripped off by my bike shop though. They sold me that bike new for R$ 2700 - which is almost US$ 1000 for a bike that is retailed in the US for little over half that ammount.
    I'm a foreigner living in the US. I dont think you got really ripped off by the bike shop. Cannondale bikes are often VERY expensive for the level of componentes they offer and you cant even compare to Specialized, which often offers the best components for a same price range. It seems that your Terra model retails around here for about US$500. So, you add 60% import duties plus 18% ICMS on top of that and you get pretty close to what you paid. It is not worthwhile in my opinion, but it is not really the bike shop fault.

    Quote Originally Posted by IronBiker
    Anyhow, I have a friend in the UK that is coming to Brazil in April, and could bring me something. I wanted to know from you guys:

    1) Do you know if there are any problems if he would bring a brand new bike, or a second hand bike for me? Could he just say its his bike and he's bringing it to race here, or would they write down the serial number of the bike and make sure he would bring it back to Europe when he goes back?
    Usually folks at customs focus more on eletronic stuff (laptops, video cameras, etc). I'd guess even if your friend get a brand new bike he can just remove that original packaging and claim that it is his bike and he is using it for competition (e.g. the Ironbiker). I suppose you have good chances of getting through (I'd try it myself). I've never seen they writing anything down and asking for the item when the person is leaving the country.

    Dont invest all that money focusing on one race race only. Think about how many hours you will spend racing the Ironbiker and how many hours you will spend riding the bike during the rest of the year. If you are going to race often a light hardtail with a good suspension fork (such as a Fox float RL) is a good choice that is also enjoyable for other all around riding. If you have rougher trails (e.g. lots of rocks) in your region and you also like to do more all around XC riding besides racing a light full suspension (such as the Specialized Spumpjumper FSR) is a good choice. (I'd get a fully FSR either way, but I'm a full suspension die-hard...)

    Good luck

    Gui

  13. #13
    espresso lover
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    Hey, i've seen this topic before!
    ww site topic about it

    Cheers!
    No cool signature...

  14. #14
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    Sorry if this is starting to get a little off topic.

    Gui,

    I found some interesting items on e-bay, and wanted you guys to give me your advice.

    A Cannondale Scalpel 1000 (2003 model) for 999
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...&category=7297


    A Specialized S-works FSR (2002 model) for 500
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...&category=7297


    A Cannondale F800 (2003 model) for 500
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...&category=7297


    The scalpel seems like a bargain, and a great bike.
    All I care really is that the bike is going to be light, comfortable and resistant. If its lighter than my Cannondale F300, I'm happy...

    Gui you recommended a full suspension or soft tail, as its much more versatile - and if its light, then who cares right? The only thing that worries me about getting a soft-tail or full-suspension bike is the back shox... if they have some sort of electronic or manual lockout system, as I would HATE to loose energy due to suspension bobbing... but I suppose on the Scalpel 1000 that would not be too much of a problem?

    Any advice would be great!

    p.s. Any idea how my friend would have to transport/box this bike to bring it with him on his luggage to Brazil?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronBiker
    Sorry if this is starting to get a little off topic.

    I found some interesting items on e-bay, and wanted you guys to give me your advice.

    A Cannondale Scalpel 1000 (2003 model) for 999
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...&category=7297

    The scalpel seems like a bargain, and a great bike.

    The only thing that worries me about getting a soft-tail or full-suspension bike is the back shox... if they have some sort of electronic or manual lockout system, as I would HATE to loose energy due to suspension bobbing... but I suppose on the Scalpel 1000 that would not be too much of a problem?
    1) The starting bid for that is $1000 and the reserve is higher yet.

    2) The ad says its "brand new - still boxed." No Cannondale dealer can sell a boxed bike (unless re-boxed from dealer).

    3) With all the bogus eBay bike ads floating around, and the fact they only have "1" feedback, I would get as much proof as possible.

    4) They said "The standard 10 year Cannondale warranty card still applies." but this also requires "proof of purchase receipt." Generally from a bike shop...not an auction. You may be S.O.L

    5) The Scalpel does have a thumb activated rear shock lock-out.

  16. #16
    Seriously ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronBiker
    Sorry if this is starting to get a little off topic.

    Gui,

    I found some interesting items on e-bay, and wanted you guys to give me your advice.

    A Cannondale Scalpel 1000 (2003 model) for 999
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...&category=7297


    A Specialized S-works FSR (2002 model) for 500
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...&category=7297


    A Cannondale F800 (2003 model) for 500
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...&category=7297


    The scalpel seems like a bargain, and a great bike.
    All I care really is that the bike is going to be light, comfortable and resistant. If its lighter than my Cannondale F300, I'm happy...

    Gui you recommended a full suspension or soft tail, as its much more versatile - and if its light, then who cares right? The only thing that worries me about getting a soft-tail or full-suspension bike is the back shox... if they have some sort of electronic or manual lockout system, as I would HATE to loose energy due to suspension bobbing... but I suppose on the Scalpel 1000 that would not be too much of a problem?

    Any advice would be great!

    p.s. Any idea how my friend would have to transport/box this bike to bring it with him on his luggage to Brazil?

    Okay, here are some points,

    First, you have to make sure you are getting the right size for you. The Ebay bikes you showed have different sizes (FSR is medium, Scalpel is Large). If you are happy with the size of your current bike, measure its top tube (the most important measuring) and get one similar. DONT buy a bike of just any size just because it is a bargain.

    Second, you can find good deals on Ebay but be careful not to get scammed. The FSR and Scalpel auctioners have about 0 feedback. That is a no go unless your friend can contact them personally to close the deal. Dont send money to a stranger with zero feedback.

    My recommendation of full suspension is more based on the trails you ride. Full suspension are fun to ride in rougher trails (rocks, roots, etc). If most of your riding is fireroads alike (estradoes de terra), hardpack, asphalt and are not very long a hardtail you suit you just fine and you will save some money. Now if you like longer, epic-ish rides (5+ hours) and endurance races a full suspension is a good call.

    You can pick a model with a lockout rear shock

    Your friend can have the bike properly disasembled and packed in a good local bike shop. Mind you that he will have to pay extra to take it to the airplane as luggage.

    Gui

  17. #17
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    Spiff... yeah, I overlooked the fact that on eBay you have to be very carefull with people's ratings and so on.

    I was thinking, do you know exactly how much tax I would have to pay on a bike if I bought it via Internet/mail from the US here in Brazil? Would it be 60% tax + 18% tax (ICMS)? i.e. 78% tax? Also, I don't know if it was you that mentioned you know a few LBS's in the US that ship to Brazil... I'm sure they would be able to issue a sale receipt with a lower price so I would pay less tax on it...

    Any ideas? It seems like bikes in the US are WAY cheaper than in the UK as well... I was looking at UK prices, they almost seem to match Brazilian prices, as the UK pound is FAR too valued... 1 pound = 5,5 reais!!!!

  18. #18
    Seriously ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronBiker
    Spiff... yeah, I overlooked the fact that on eBay you have to be very carefull with people's ratings and so on.

    I was thinking, do you know exactly how much tax I would have to pay on a bike if I bought it via Internet/mail from the US here in Brazil? Would it be 60% tax + 18% tax (ICMS)? i.e. 78% tax? Also, I don't know if it was you that mentioned you know a few LBS's in the US that ship to Brazil... I'm sure they would be able to issue a sale receipt with a lower price so I would pay less tax on it...

    Any ideas? It seems like bikes in the US are WAY cheaper than in the UK as well... I was looking at UK prices, they almost seem to match Brazilian prices, as the UK pound is FAR too valued... 1 pound = 5,5 reais!!!!

    I'm not 100% sure with the import duties. I believe it is 60% plus 18% if it is over US$500. You need to confirm with the receita federal. The correios should be able to give you some detailed information quickly, find the number of their main office and give them a call. You will need to fill some paperwork for import over US$500.

    It wasnt me who mention about the LBS who ship to Brasil. However, there is a bike shop here in my town (Davis, California) that carries both Specialized and Cannondale. I can put you in contact with the owner and you two can work out the details. I dont know if they ship to Brasil but I can check.

    To import a bike may not be as simple as it looks. If I was in your place I would try it for sure, but keep in mind that you have to look at all details and paperwork to avoid unxpected costs, delays, etc. Write down all the costs and confirm if it is indeed worthwhile. Dont forget also to check how the warranty would be handled in case you have a problem with the frame.

    You can email me at gmarques_br AT yahoo DOT com

    Gui

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