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  1. #1
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    Anybody use roadie parts...

    to make things lighter? If so, what parts do you use? I'm just getting into the saving weight thing and I'm just curious how and what to change on my bike. I'm definitely getting lighter tubes and possibly lighter tires (WTB NanoRaptors). This is my racing bike and only gets about 300 miles a year put on it so I don't need THE most durable parts. Just parts that last a season or two.

    I did just pick up my S.I. SLR and I'm stoked about that.
    Why would I need more than one gear?
    @A_SingleSpeeder
    EPA = crooks!

  2. #2
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    Not personally but I did see a custom build carbon NRS at the LBS that had a Dura-Ace RD. Yes, I asked twice! That thing was tricked out and built to be liiiiiiiiiight. I wish I'd asked what it weighed.
    Big hoopy.
    Turner Sultan / On One Inbred

  3. #3
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    several...

    -Shimano Dura Ace rear derailleur (2004, 10s, short cage version with SRP aluminium kit..173g)
    -one piece 12-27 aluminium cassette (110g) during winter Shimano Dura Ace 12-27 cassette(180g)
    -Shimano Dura Ace braze-on front derailleur with Scott 34.9 adapter clamp (86g) works with triple chainrings too! the same size XTR weighs 109g.
    -Shimano Dura Ace chain (soon to be replaced with KMC 10s chain: 257g uncut)

    i use the "Dura Ace setup" over 3 years now and durability of those parts is equal if not better than XTR.the shorter derailleur is less likely to bend and develops less play too.shifts as smooth as new and the closer gearing of the road cassette lets you maintain your cadence better.the new 04 derailleur is just 15g lighter than its precedessor.
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    Last edited by nino; 02-18-2004 at 10:11 AM.

  4. #4
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    What about using road pedals, like speedplay? My bike is a bit of a hybrid that sees mostly (95%) road duty. Thanks!

  5. #5
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    Maybe a goofy thought here, but...

    How about building a 10s MTB drivetrain with 7800 series derailleur, chain and cassette? You could use aerobar/crossbar thumbies coupled with Paul's adapter. Total shifter weight would be in the twist-shifter range, I expect, while a 10s 12-27t cassette (possibly modefied to 11/27t) would give a nice, gradual gear spread.

  6. #6
    Max
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    i use speedplay frogs. these are MTB-version though. mind that with the X-series you will have to use road shoes as well, resulting in no off-road-copatibility at all.

    btw: i use my frogs both on- and off-road

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by nino
    -Shimano Dura Ace rear derailleur (2004, 10s, short cage version with SRP aluminium kit..173g)
    -one piece 12-27 aluminium cassette (110g) during winter Shimano Dura Ace 12-27 cassette(180g)
    -Shimano Dura Ace braze-on front derailleur with Scott 34.9 adapter clamp (86g) works with triple chainrings too! the same size XTR weighs 109g.
    -Shimano Dura Ace chain (soon to be replaced with KMC 10s chain: 257g uncut)

    i use the "Dura Ace setup" over 3 years now and durability of those parts is equal if not better than XTR.the shorter derailleur is less likely to bend and develops less play too.shifts as smooth as new and the closer gearing of the road cassette lets you maintain your cadence better.the new 04 derailleur is just 15g lighter than its precedessor.
    Sounds interestering with that Shimano front derailleur.... is that Scott adapter clamp a aftermarket-product? My Shimano XTR FD 2003 (with dual pull) weights about 150 grams so your option sounds very light! Please enlighten me :-)

  8. #8
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    Mads,

    I've been looking into this and apparently Shimano has a clamp available - found it @ PricePoint...

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail.htm...lamp%20Adapter

    There is however no weight reported...

    [edit] SM-AD11 (31.8mm) / SM-AD15 (34.9mm) [/edit]
    Last edited by Knut; 02-26-2004 at 08:04 AM.

  9. #9
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    DA Cassette is a Pre Requisite for any Weight Weenie

    I can wholeheartedly recommend DA 12-27 cassettes, instead of XTR or whatever.

    Not only are they ALOT lighter, but also they give you closer gear ratios.

    It is VERY rare that you encounter hills too steep for a 22-27 lowest gear.

    I recently mounted DA 2004 10 speed onto my Trek 5900. I was disappointed at the shifter weight - 420g, this is up 30g on 2003. My hand is twitching for the drill/Dremel - has anyone tried to lighten these up?

  10. #10
    Fuel Master
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    Could be...

    Quote Originally Posted by Knut
    Mads,

    I've been looking into this and apparently Shimano has a clamp available - found it @ PricePoint...

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail.htm...lamp%20Adapter

    There is however no weight reported...

    [edit] SM-AD11 (31.8mm) / SM-AD15 (34.9mm) [/edit]

    the solution on the quest for a lighter FD! Will try to locate a band-adapter @ the LBS and weight it!

    How's your SLR-saddle doing? I'm thinking about stripping of the leather of my worn SLR but I have some questions....

    - is it slippery without the leather?
    - What else have you done to modify your saddle? any drilling etc.?

    and last but nok least... do you have some pictures of the saddle?

    Mads

  11. #11
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    Great, let us know what you find out - you also need the 34,9 adapter right?

    Regarding the SLR it's a no-brainer IMHO. Comfort is as good as before - have done quite a few 40-50 kilometer rides + the normal 25-30km grouprides since tuning it, both on gravel roads and singletrack. Even some medium roadtrips. Comfort is same as before, if not better - looks can be decieving, it looks like some kind of torture instrument... I've already posted pictures in this forum, but I'll find them and send you an email.

    Eric, I'm not sure about a 10-speed drive train for MTB - unless you live in a nice and dry location where it probably would be excellent.

    Berni, agreed on DA / Ultegra cassettes for MTB, depending on your location and how steep hills you encounter. Here in Denmark the Ultegra cassettes are even cheaper then the XT I normally use which is a nice added bonus. I have to admit that I'm cheap and won't fork out for a DA cassette...

  12. #12
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    Shimano braze-on clamp: 27g

    the shimano 34.9mm clamp weighs 29g.makes the combo still weighing less than XTR at around 103g (74g DA derailleur+29g clamp, both with steel bolts so 98g with al-bolts) BUT my clamp came on my 03 Scott scandium frame.it's some taiwan made clamp which weighs just 13g (with al-bolt).

  13. #13
    Boj
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    Quote Originally Posted by nino
    the shimano 34.9mm clamp weighs 29g.makes the combo still weighing less than XTR at around 103g (74g DA derailleur+29g clamp, both with steel bolts so 98g with al-bolts) BUT my clamp came on my 03 Scott scandium frame.it's some taiwan made clamp which weighs just 13g (with al-bolt).
    I have been thinking about how to use a DA front derailleur for my new build ever since Nino tried it out successfully few months ago.

    Major problem for me though is that my frame is top pull. I am in a fortunate position though mines a 31.8 mm seat tube size and DA front derailleur comes with integrated clamp in that size and weighs 83 g.

    Not to make it too easy on me though I have just (mistakenly) bought a braze on DA derailleur off Ebay which I thought was with an integrated 31.8 clamp. Nevertheless I think that may be ok because I believe I can machine a very light Aluminium band and make it work. From what I have seen bands that you buy have separate bolts for attaching derailleur to the band and for tightening the band to the tube. I will try to make a band so that one bolt does both those duties which should make it efficient = light. Will get my derailleur in the mail soon so will know more about details.

    As for the top pull problem I will machine a small bracket which attaches to the cable clamp bolt and extends to the other side of pivot point making the derailleur top pull. From what I have seen on pics this should be feasible but hope that bracket won't have to extend too much to the side so that it interferes with my cranks or legs when pedalling. Other options are pivoting the cable around frame 'bridge' shown below or attaching a pivot roller to the frame.

    <center><img src="http://gallery.consumerreview.com/webcrossing/images/toppull(2).jpg"></center>

    Anyway will let you know how I go with it.
    If in doubt - pedal harder!!!

  14. #14
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    Just out of interest, what is the difference between "braze on" and clamp, what exactly braze on? I am considering this route for my bike, a good place to save some weight IMO (isn't anywhere a good place )
    Cul is a regretted trademark of the CulBaire Co'op Pty Ltd, as are his random ramblings and associated bullshit.

  15. #15
    Max
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    @ CulBaire: "braze on" FDs are those that come without a clamp. you mount the front derailleur directly to the frame, which has an integrated (BRAZED-ON) eyelet. many road frames use this system.

    on the other hand, there are some road frames that - like MTBs - dont have those eyelets, so you have to use a clamp to attach the FD to the frame. unlike MTB FDs road FDs are screwed onto the clamp (while deore/LX/XT/XTR/... FDs have the clamp integrated into the der. itself)


    @ Boj: i'd drill a hole approx. 6 cm below the FD and rivet a threaded insert (like those used to mount the bottle cages) into the hole. then you can screw a little pulley into the thread. many cyclo cross bikes use this method. should be the lightest and most reliable solution....

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