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  1. #1
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    where's the thread for riding with dogs?

    Hey folks,

    I've been searching for a minute and can't find any threads for riding with dogs. I'm preeetty sure there is already a thread out there but i can't find it. I'm just looking to for places to ride with my dog offleash. i've never done it before so I want to work her up to it.

    if there's not, we can use this one.

    -joel

  2. #2
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    I have friends who bring their dogs every now and then. We have rode with the dogs off lease many times at Tokul E/W and Black Diamond (Summit ridge, Henry's ridge and the West side stuff).

  3. #3
    Just roll it......
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    B-rad shredding with his dog.....Timmy.

    Kona Entourage tested on pinkbike.com


  4. #4
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    I bring my dog with all the time, it's favorite thing in the world. Best places I've found are:

    Tokuls
    Galbraith
    Tiger (only if it's cool out)
    Tapeworm
    Black Diamond/Sawyer
    Paradise (weekdays, early in the morning)

    I avoid more popular areas and state parks, not worth the risk or hassle. Places like St. Eds, Duthie, etc.

    I find the best way to get a dog used to going on rides is to go with someone else who already had a trail dog. The new dog will be just as happy following another dog, and they're less likely to run from a fun new group than boring old you (from their point of view) solo. My dog was having so much fun chasing other dogs and horsing around, I don't think he even realize he was off the leash the first couple rides
    Tarekith.com

    '12 RM Slayer70, i9 Torch, Flow EX, XT Brakes, 5050 s3.

  5. #5
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    Good post. Tokuls is where I took my dog; no leash law and little traffic. Was a great spot for that. Would occasionally sneak her in on a night ride at some other locations, too. Definitely agree on skipping places like Duthie...
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    -bp

  6. #6
    FM
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    If you take your dog to Tokul, please make sure you're prepared for the occasional horse encounter.
    (this tip provided by the owner of an unruly dog )

  7. #7
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    I wonder what the Hancock user fee is for dogs?

    The best places are the least used or as Tarakith mentioned, fairly well used places on the off hours. Definately not Duthie....

  8. #8
    Squeaky Wheel
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    FWIW, dogs are not allowed off-leash at Paradise Valley. The rangers tell me that they aggressively enforce the rule when they come across off-leash dogs. Luckily for dog owners, they are not at the park a lot...
    Last edited by woodway; 02-09-2012 at 06:35 AM.

  9. #9
    I got the velcros
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    I would recommend to start out in the winter months when there's much less trail traffic until your dog gets used to being around weird sounding mechanical contraptions. Would hate for a new bike-dog to get hurt. Or some biker who goes over the bars into a tree when the dog gets spooked. Or if one of those wonderful horse people gets scared and falls off their trusty steed.

  10. #10
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    I had a guy on a horse pull out a revolver when my dog ran up to his horse. He stated this was for the dogs protection. I didn't argue and got the F outta dodge.

    A horse can kill a dog easily. I think most large dogs realize this. Terriers think they are the size of houses and can kill anything that moves, and usually want to. So know your dog and its traits around other animals.
    Regional Race Manager, Knolly Bikes
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  11. #11
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    I came up on a horse while walking out at Tokul with my dog last summer. Luckily the lady riding was really nice, and the two animals were more confused than anything, I think. Pretty funny watching a horse and a Dane sitting a few feet apart, both with a look of "what the eff is that?" on their faces.

    He's scared to death of bikes, though. No biking dog for me.

  12. #12
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    Horses can really clobber a dog, and some have a twisted sense of entertainment in stomping the stuffing out of them. Others are scared of dogs which could result in a bad wreck for the rider. Some don't care either way. The problem is that you don't know what flavor you're encountering, so best to stay safe and keep everyone apart. Mules can be extremely dangerous for dogs. Unlike horses they don't just flail around with their feet- mules are lightning fast, extremely powerful for their size, and their aim is precise. And for whatever reason they'll aggressively pursue a dog more often than a horse.

    Because of the amount of wildlife we've got around here, I keep electric collars on my dogs when they come along. The LAST thing I need is a dog tangling up with a bear or a cougar, and my GSPs would eagerly leap right in and leave the resulting repair job for me to figure out. We also have a lot of deer and elk around and it's illegal for dogs to chase game (they could get shot in the act and there's nothing I could do about it).

    My dog first aid kit includes skin glue, boots, vet wrap, and abx eye ointment. Most injuries we've had have been feet, and glue + boots can return a lame dog to 100% in a couple minutes.

    I've been working with my youngest 2 dogs off and on since this fall. I'm hoping to take them along more often this season.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  13. #13
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    Good point on the horses, definitely something the dogs should have seen before heading out to a place like tokul.
    Tarekith.com

    '12 RM Slayer70, i9 Torch, Flow EX, XT Brakes, 5050 s3.

  14. #14
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    I've actually seen people riding with well mannered dogs at Duthie on several occasions. It's general real early (7am-8am) and they take off before the 10am-noon mob of people start arriving.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarekith View Post
    Good point on the horses, definitely something the dogs should have seen before heading out to a place like tokul.
    It's a good idea for sure, but the problem is that you still don't know what that horse is going to do so better to play it safe.

    I worked on a horse ranch for years as a kid that had a blue heeler that spent all her not otherwise occupied time harassing the horses, so as a group the herd accumulated attitude and targeting practice. One beautiful day the owner suddenly had free so we headed for the hills riding a couple broke horses + ponying a thoroughbred filly along side for the training exposure, and mid-ride we encountered a very nice older gentleman on a retired police horse with a rough haired collie following along. The horses were perfectly relaxed as we all sat chatting when suddenly the filly cocked back and shot the collie- who had wandered behind her quietly sniffing at something- 20'+ into the brush. The horse hadn't so much as twitched an ear ahead of time so we never even had a chance to realize she was mounting an attack. Fortunately the dog was OK, but the vision of sweet Lassie flying through the air as a hairy cannon ball was one of those things I'll never quite shake.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  16. #16
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    I,ve been training a new dog this winter at mud mt. near Enumclaw. I started out on foot so I could control her better. The horse people seem to appreciate the effort it takes to have a well trained animal and have been very helpfull. I,m a little nervous about taking her to Black Diamond because the trails are so close to highway 169.

  17. #17
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    Ride with my dog on Galby all the time. I attach a bell to her collar to let other riders know she might be incoming and to scare off other animals.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kliemann53 View Post
    I,ve been training a new dog this winter at mud mt. near Enumclaw. I started out on foot so I could control her better. The horse people seem to appreciate the effort it takes to have a well trained animal and have been very helpfull. I,m a little nervous about taking her to Black Diamond because the trails are so close to highway 169.
    Try some of the further back trails like Tribulation. Ws just out there yesterday with my dog, good day of riding.
    Tarekith.com

    '12 RM Slayer70, i9 Torch, Flow EX, XT Brakes, 5050 s3.

  19. #19
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    He comes with most all the time when riding in the sagebrush foothills. In the forest during summer I generally leave him home. It's better when I can see him and he can see me. In the woods the visibility is poor. In the sagebrush I can spot him most of the time.

    I always carry a short leash in my pocket at more popular trails.

  20. #20
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    I take my dog most places I ride. She is generally well behaved though and I don't tend to ride at a lot of the more popular areas. This picture is at the start of Xanadu in Leavenworth. She did 3 shuttle runs that day. She also did 2 shuttle runs on Kachess Ridge this past summer.

  21. #21
    Slothful dirt hippie
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    I don't doubt it- cattle dogs are TOUGH.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by verslowrdr View Post
    I don't doubt it- cattle dogs are TOUGH.
    I wasn't trying to brag (and honestly she's only part cattle dog, 20 pounds, so pretty small) but a lot of these posts make it sound like its difficult to get a dog out on the trail due to heat, horses, what have you. I have found that with a dog who minds its owner you can pretty much go anywhere you want (where dogs are allowed of course) and most dogs love it. Its in their blood to run. Just bring food and water (and a small first aid kit like you mention is a great idea).......

  23. #23
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    IMO it depends a lot on the dog, and somewhat on where you go. Riding out in Boostin's area can be a little easier because you can see a long ways and human activity is very limited. Even the game is scattered out. And herding dogs naturally tend to stick with their folks, unlike hunting dogs who are bred specifically to range away from their people seeking out critters.

    And maybe you're just luckier than me! Over the years I've had dogs almost run over by log trucks, almost run over by a kid coasting a motorcycle down the ridge (ran out of gas or something), jump deer/elk/coyotes/bobcats, empty out bird nests, fortunately stay put when we've run into bear, bounce off barbed wire fences, eat parts of very old carcasses (sometimes without harm, sometimes with spectacular results), chafe off more pad skin than I can remember, and break quite a few nails... they captured one skunk while I was running them at night, tangled with one porcupine in harness, and killed one HUGE skunk on the back porch a couple years ago.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebxtreme View Post
    B-rad shredding with his dog.....Timmy.
    Brad's really steppin' it up with his videos/photography lately
    "Bound to cover just a little more ground"

  25. #25
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    Not sure if a lot of people are aware of this because they don't seem to like to advertise it much, but according to Washington Administrative Codes, DNR lands are basically "open unless posted closed" when it comes to pets off leash, meaning unless it is specifically posted at trailheads as leash being required, dogs can be legally off leash so long as owners can control them.

    A ranger told me that good rule of thumb is to expect leash requirement within NRCAs but not on trust lands designated for logging. Reading through Snoqualmie Corridor Rec Plan kickoff meeting notes reminded me that not many people know about this.

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