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  1. #1
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    Seattle Area: What type of bike do you ride?

    In a couple weeks I will be moving to Seattle for my Master's Degree. I figure moving to Washington is great excuse to replace my old hardtail. I am looking at spending about $2000 for a full suspension rig. I am looking at bikes from 120mm to 150mm travel, leaning towards the 150mm side. For those of you who live in the area what type of bike would you suggest for the terrain? Growing up in Michigan I have been doing mostly XC type stuff. I'm hoping to ride more all mountain type terrain, long descents, techincal terrain, maybe some occasional lift service type stuff and get more into jumps/drops but nothing too big. However this will be my only bike besides a fairly cheap giant hardtail and old singlespeed. If I got something like a Giant Reign would I find it to be too much for a majority of the riding? Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Welcome to Washington! IMHO a Giant Reign would be a good bike for most of the trails around the Seattle area. I have a Giant Reign X and it is one of the funnest bikes I have owned.

  3. #3
    Dream Design Dig Repeat
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    Welcome to WA! Check out Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance (yes, I'm a shameless Evergreen pimp) for a good trail guide, club rides, trail work, etc. http://evergreenmtb.org.

    Based on your description, you'll be happy on a bike like the Reign. Lots of good options in that category: Mission, Remedy, Covert, Pitch, etc.
    Issaquah & Seattle real estate agent. Buy or sell a home with me and I donate $500 to Evergreen MTB Alliance
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  4. #4
    JRA
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    Seattle area - all you really need is a rigid singlespeed.

  5. #5
    In Armor We Trust
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    For what you're describing, personally I'd prob be looking into a Giant Reign, Transition Covert, Santa Cruz Nomad.
    DH/FR: Intense 951
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  6. #6
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    Thanks for the welcomes and suggestions! I am really looking forward to checking out all the trails in the area, looks like tons of good options. And thanks for the Evergreen link, I have already been looking at the site, looks like a great resource. Its good to here I am heading in the right direction with the Reign as far as type of bike. Looks like there is quite a few good shops with options in that range, so I am looking forward to riding as many as I can. I am in Chicago now so not much around as far as 5"-6" travel bikes.

  7. #7
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    I have a reign x and I love it for most riding out here. It isn't as good for tight and twisty, but it just takes more skill (which I currently do not have).

  8. #8
    Moist and Delicious
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    I have a Mission, and it's spectacular in most settings. Welcome to the area!
    Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there are no sweeter words than "I told you so."

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by nasai
    I have a Mission, and it's spectacular in most settings. Welcome to the area!
    Thanks Mind me asking what shop you got your Mission from? Thats one bike I was looking at but really wanted to ride before I considered it.

  10. #10
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    Welcome to the best area for mountain biking south of the border. Local bikers on this forum and anonymous folks, have been responsible for doing projects like:
    Colonade: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-sfPuRyASw

    and

    Duthie Hill: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0w-qdQRcEcs

    Not to mention the I-90 stuff, Galbraith etc. For all the goods check out Evergreenmtb.org

    I personally moved to Colorado for the biking, and came back here. It is that good. (and wet!)
    Regional Race Manager, Knolly Bikes
    Washington State, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa
    ~~~KNOLLY KNATION RACING~~~

  11. #11
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    I would say to keep your hardtail and ride some of the trails on it...I don't have a full suspension rig but am quite happy with my On-One Inbred 456 (AM steel hardtail w/130mm RS Revelation fork). On longer rides I would like full suspension to keep my backside comfy but a FS bike is not in the budget....

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by eggroller
    I would say to keep your hardtail and ride some of the trails on it...I don't have a full suspension rig but am quite happy with my On-One Inbred 456 (AM steel hardtail w/130mm RS Revelation fork). On longer rides I would like full suspension to keep my backside comfy but a FS bike is not in the budget....
    I thought about sticking it out with it for a while but its a fairly entry level Giant hardtail with an 80mm fork thats about 4 years old. My skill level and riding style preference have definetly surpassed the bike so I am ready for something else. I figured I will definetely keep it around for fireroad/easy xc type rides or around town.

  13. #13
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    I was about to come on here and ask exactly the same question, but leaning towards 120mm. I live in Woodinville (Seattle area) and I broke out my antique Rockhopper and have been riding the crap out of Paradise Valley all year.

    So picture if you will tight, wooded trails with tons of roots, some rocks and then more roots. Not a lot of climbing.

    But if you head to the mountains the terrain changes a lot. Now you're talking about 2000 ft climbs, up then down. Tiger Mtn is 2000 ft and 40mins from Seattle. We have property in Winthrop, which is scrub pine mountain trails, where I plan to ride a lot too.

    I'm also trying to figure out the best bike for all, at under $2000. Hell, if I can make my old Rockhopper work here I'm sure I can manage with any FS bike. But I don't want to make a bad choice either.

    On my short list is Stumpjumper, Pitch and Superlight. I want to ride a CD RZ One20 too. There are just too many damn bikes to choose from.

  14. #14
    Slothful dirt hippie
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    If your budget is tight, you should include a Giant of some stripe into the list as their bang-for-buck ratio is very good. Husband has an Anthem X3 he uses as a trail bike and just loves it. If you want more than 4" of travel and don't care for XC geometry, check out the Trance instead. I test rode the Trance and would have seriously considered it, but it was just a little long/slack for my taste... and the Ibis had already sank her fangs in and poisoned me, lol....
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  15. #15
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    go to the Santa Cruz Bikes Demo day on saturday and sunday at duthie hill.. you can ride all kinds of bikes of different calibers and decide what style of bike fits you.

    You can then compare those bikes to others of a similar style.

    personally I feel a Blur LT2 is just about perfect for 90% of the trails out here that are more geared towards the XC end of things. frequently built up under 30lbs, 140mm rear travel, 150mm front. pedals great, can certainly handle any drops or jumps you'd want to take it on. it wouldn't be the best for park access, but thats a whole 'nother level of bike.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by verslowrdr
    ...and the Ibis had already sank her fangs in and poisoned me, lol....
    Aggressive ibis, huh?



    Not what you're talking about? Damn.

  17. #17
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    5" bikes are a commodity item these days. Every self respecting brand carries one or more and really, any one of them would be a heck of a lot of fun. I'd go the demo route since it is available of you can but there won't be many more with summer coming to a close soon and Interbike in a couple months. Fit will be everything. Like shoes and cars, not every one will feel, "just right". So, try a bunch, ask someone for a trailhead or parking lot demo. Most of us won't mind if we really like what we are riding. Can't hurt.
    I just love my Transition Covert and with a wheelset change, I get 2 bikes in one. And, they are relatively local (Ferndale) which is great.New is out of the budget but good deals on used ones are there. I'll also second Giant for the "bang for your buck" genre. Though the Reign can be pretty slack for straight up XC riding of any distance.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by juice View Post
    Welcome to WA! Check out Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance (yes, I'm a shameless Evergreen pimp) for a good trail guide, club rides, trail work, etc. Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance - Washington's Largest Mountain Bike Club.

    Based on your description, you'll be happy on a bike like the Reign. Lots of good options in that category: Mission, Remedy, Covert, Pitch, etc.
    I needed this EMBA link! Thank you.

  19. #19
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    JRA lives at the intersection of being a masochistic Luddite, but he's not that far off. Truth is, it really depends on where you go and what your skillset is.

    I've got a few bikes -- and I heartily recommend a "bang for your buck" 4 to 5 inch travel all-mountain bike like the Reign or my own Stumpjumper 29er Expert -- for general all-purpose riding in the PNW.

    That said, allow me to take a different point of view. The only style of bike I would NOT recommend would be an aggressive XC race bike. I've had one. I beat it to hell and back and was constantly replacing/fixing it. If your plan is to ride often, ride hard, and take it in the backcountry and the frontcountry and maybe go off some sweet jumps (right after you show us your nunchuck skills) then you will be better served with a slacker 5 inch all-mountain bike or even a hardtail singlespeed.

    I also highly recommend a Mooto-X YBB for long-distance days. As Ferris Bueller once said, "It is so choice. If you have the means, I highly recommend picking one up."

    Welcome to the PNW. Most of us aren't from here, but we love it all the same.

  20. #20
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    Healthy used market in our area as well to REALLY maximize your dollars spent if that floats your boat.

    Otherwise, I'd go an AM rig or longer travel trail. I ride an AM bike and DO ride it up most everything.

  21. #21
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    So skip something like an XTC 29er, or. Highball Carbon, and go for something like a Tallboy LT, Trance, Blir, Reign, etc? What about 29er va 26er for Washington trails? I've heard mixed opinions (naturally), but would love some more perspective, especially from someone who advises against the XC style of bike. Hearing reasons is always beneficial, regardless of what one chooses in the end. Thanks in advance!

  22. #22
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    I'm actually considering a longer travel 29er for my next bike. For me though, I'm not a weight weenie, I'm not a racer, but I like a bike that is durable because I try to ride ALOT and don't want to consume things like wheels etc by abusing a lightweight bike. I'd rather pedal the extra pounds up hill just so that I can wail hard on the way down and not worry about breaking stuff.

    if I were you, I would just stick with the bike you have until you check out some of the hot spots around here and then decide.

  23. #23
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    That's probably one knock I've heard on 29ers: The wheels aren't as durable as 26er wheels, when it comes to trail/all-mountain stuff (landings/drops in particular). I've also been considering a long-travel 29er (Tallboy LT), but am a bit worried about the 29er wheel durability vs 26er wheel durability, as I'm an in-shape 220 pounds. I played safety in college at 210 to 215, so I'm not geting much smaller, haha. I sometimes think I could be worrying about wheel durability for no reason, but I'd hate to be replacing wheels, as you mentioned.

  24. #24
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    I'm 165 soaking wet LOL. I'd go AM in just about any make. Find a bike with like propedal or a lockout and they climb great. Plus for your afterwork duthie efforts....it's inevitable btw the place is a vortex....you can beat on it there and feel ok about it.

    My lust for a 29er is somewhat based on me wanting to go to a larger quiver. That with a parkish or freeride bike and I think I could be happy. For a quiver of one, it's hard to hate an all mountain rig...hence the name!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by yo EDDY View Post
    I'm 165 soaking wet LOL. I'd go AM in just about any make. Find a bike with like propedal or a lockout and they climb great. Plus for your afterwork duthie efforts....it's inevitable btw the place is a vortex....you can beat on it there and feel ok about it.

    My lust for a 29er is somewhat based on me wanting to go to a larger quiver. That with a parkish or freeride bike and I think I could be happy. For a quiver of one, it's hard to hate an all mountain rig...hence the name!
    Haha! Being 165 would make the decision a bit easier, as my impact on the wheels would be so much less. The Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29 felt so nice during a parking lot ride, so I can't help but think that a 29er is the way to go. On the other hand, the Stumpy FSR 26er felt good, but not as fitting as the 29er. It sucks, because I get the impression from folks that the 29er won't hold up as well at my weight in trail/AM situations, but they fit feel more natural than 26ers as far as size. I'm 5'11", just to disclose that.

    I really don't know which way to go, but am starting to wonder if I just need to get used to the 26er size. I hadn't ridden a bike in about 17 years until 3 weeks ago, and I got a 29er HT, so I've become comfy on that, and the size just feels right for my size. Who wants to go around bustin and replacing wheels though, haha?! Decisions, decisions...

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