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  1. #51
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    the 'dale jekyll sounds really interesting. sounds like having a dropper post for the whole bike. drop it for climbs, raise it for descents. In 26" world, i think the 150-160" travel is awesome for around here. You don't really even need to adjust much at that travel. anything helps though.

    fwiw, the one thing that would make me hesitant about the jekyll is that its more parts to maintain and that may also fail. How did it pedal at full travel? Is there a non adjustable version that sits at 150mm?

    -joel

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Sounds like the Trance you tried was too big for you.

    Seat tube angle is a little bit of a red herring. But it's a lot easier to find information about ETT than reach.

    FWIW, I can't imagine having a mode switch lever to screw around with either. The most sustained descent I know right around here only lasts 18 minutes, and a ton of our trails roll. Although maybe if you found yourself at Tokul a lot.

    A ton of FS bikes have custom valving, even if the shock is mostly stock.

    Just buy whichever was your favorite. You can't predict the future, so if you buy the skill-building bike now, you may never get to the one you really wanted. And you already have a hardtail for skill building.
    Good points. I've let go of the idea of the Jekyll and Trance, and have fully embraced the 29ers for my style of riding and overall comfort level. After riding at Duthie, I realized how much more I prefer the 29ers than almost all of the 26ers.

    I liked the Tallboy LT, but the suspension felt pretty stiff, and I'm curious as to how much of that was the suspension design, and how much of it was the shock tuning. I'd also probably dig it with just a little slacker of a hta. The Yeti SB95 really has my interest right now, and I'm going to demo one asap.

    I hated the Blur trc, and basically learned that the 26" bikes steeper than 67 hta feel a bit unsafe to me at this point. The Blur was lightning quick, and cornered like a demon, but it felt more like a roller coaster ride than a bike ride. I just felt out of control, though it was pretty fun while it lasted. Nolt a ride I wanna get back on, however, haha.

    The Mojo HD was the surprise of the demo day, as I thought it was a perfect bike, save for the 26" format still feeling a bit less stable than the 29". I'd buy a Mojo HD without question though. If I do ever get a 26er, this is the one (at least at this point). It just felt right! A FS 29er that felt like the HD in the cockpit would be too nice. I think I like slack, as long as it can still climb. The HD surprised the hell out of me with that slack sta especially!

    I loved the Stumpjumper FSR's plush suspension, but don't want to fiddle with propedal levers and all of that, and did feel the plush suspension bob on climbs. If I'd ridden very technical trails, I'd have hated that suspension design.

    The Nomad, with quite similar geometry to the Mojo HD, was not my cup of tea whatsoever. Probably my least favorite bike. Felt on top of the bike, didn't climb well, and didn't really feel all that great descending either. The Mojo HD murdered it, in ever aspect.

    The Stumpy Comp Evo was a decent bike, but the Mojo HD ruined all of the other 26ers, so I have nothing special to report about the Evo, save that it rode better than the Nomad and Blur TRC, for my tastes.

    Overall, my experience at Duthie led me to wonder how a DW Link FS 29er might ride. Maybe that Mojo HD was dialed to perfection, or the Tallboy LT was not, but part of me had no choice but to wonder if the major differences in suspension feel were between the DW Link and VPP2. At any rate, I'm eager to try the Tallboy LT again with some careful time spent tuning the rear shock, as well as the Yeti SB95. I also can't help but wonder if some of that suspension stiffness I felt with the LT might be attributed to riding it later in the day, after being a bit more tired. This is a big reason why I will need to test it again. I'm not sure if I'd be better of with the extra travel of the LT, compared to the SB95, but I'm getting to the point where a decision just has to be made, so I'll try them both and see what I think. It's also tough not to wonder how the Ibis Ripley will ride, after falling in love with the Mojo. A very small part of me wants to just say, "Screw it!" and go with the Mojo, but I love the 29er's overall feel more than I loved the Mojo HD.

    My gut is saying I'm gonna end up getting the SB-95, but only time will tell. There are so many bikes out there, and I don't want to ignore any, but I believe I've narrowed it down to the LT and the 95, with the Mojo HD just slightly calling my name. I believe I'll be getting an HD in the coming years regardless, so I won't sweat it for right now. Pardon if I came off as ranting. Kinda just offering some brief notes on my experience, and do feel I could've possibly went into greater detail with some of the rides. As always, feel free to chime in about anything I've mentioned you guys!

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider View Post
    the 'dale jekyll sounds really interesting. sounds like having a dropper post for the whole bike. drop it for climbs, raise it for descents. In 26" world, i think the 150-160" travel is awesome for around here. You don't really even need to adjust much at that travel. anything helps though.

    fwiw, the one thing that would make me hesitant about the jekyll is that its more parts to maintain and that may also fail. How did it pedal at full travel? Is there a non adjustable version that sits at 150mm?

    -joel
    Yeah, the Jekyll is a cool idea, and it rids very nicely. You can definitely feel the difference between the 90mm and 150mm modes. It's different than a dropper post though, since the seat doesn't get out of the way, but I know what you meant.

    The proprietary shock is what steered me away from it. It pedaled very nicely at full travel, imo. There isn't a non-adjustable 150mm version though. The major attracting point with the Jekyll is supposed to be that the travel is adjustable with the flick of a switch on the handlebars, and that it steepens/slackens the geometry (67.8 in 90mm mode, and I believe 66.8 in 150mm mode).

    If you ride it, I believe you'll dig it, but you're definitely stuck with that shock, and if you end up wanting to tune/change it down the line, it isn't an option at this point. It is one ridiculously nice-looking bike too, so that makes it even more difficult to give it the final no-go. Falling in love with that Mojo HD made it so much easier to let go of the Jekyll though, haha!

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Sounds like the Trance you tried was too big for you.

    Seat tube angle is a little bit of a red herring. But it's a lot easier to find information about ETT than reach.

    FWIW, I can't imagine having a mode switch lever to screw around with either. The most sustained descent I know right around here only lasts 18 minutes, and a ton of our trails roll. Although maybe if you found yourself at Tokul a lot.

    A ton of FS bikes have custom valving, even if the shock is mostly stock.

    Just buy whichever was your favorite. You can't predict the future, so if you buy the skill-building bike now, you may never get to the one you really wanted. And you already have a hardtail for skill building.
    Good points. I've let go of the idea of the Jekyll and Trance, and have fully embraced the 29ers for my style of riding and overall comfort level. After riding at Duthie, I realized how much more I prefer the 29ers than almost all of the 26ers.

    I really liked the Tallboy LT, but the suspension felt pretty stiff, and I'm curious as to how much of that was the suspension design, and how much of it was the shock tuning. I'd also probably dig it with just a little slacker of a hta. The Yeti SB95 really has my interest right now, and I'm going to demo one asap.

    I hated the Blur trc, and basically learned that the 26" bikes steeper than 67 hta feel a bit unsafe to me at this point. The Blur was lightning quick, and cornered like a demon, but it felt more like a roller coaster ride than a bike ride. I just felt out of control, though it was pretty fun while it lasted. Nolt a ride I wanna get back on, however, haha.

    The Mojo HD was the surprise of the demo day, as I thought it was a perfect bike, save for the 26" format still feeling a bit less stable than the 29". I'd buy a Mojo HD without question though. If I do ever get a 26er, this is the one (at least at this point).

    I loved the Stumpjumper FSR's plush suspension, but don't want to fiddle with propedal levers and all of that, and did feel the plush suspension bob on climbs. If I'd ridden very technical trails, I'd have hated that suspension design.

    The Nomad, with quite similar geometry to the Mojo HD, was not my cup of tea whatsoever. Probably my least favorite bike. Felt on top of the bike, didn't climb well, and didn't really feel all that great descending either. The Mojo HD murdered it, in ever aspect.

    The Stumpy Comp Evo was a decent bike, but the Mojo HD ruined all of the other 26ers, so I have nothing special to report about the Evo, save that it rode better than the Nomad and Blur TRC, for my tastes.

    Overall, my experience at Duthie led me to wonder how a DW Link FS 29er might ride. Maybe that Mojo HD was dialed to perfection, or the Tallboy LT was not, but part of me had no choice but to wonder if the major differences in suspension feel were between the DW Link and VPP2. At any rate, I'm eager to try the Tallboy LT again with some careful time spent tuning the rear shock, as well as the Yeti SB95. I also can't help but wonder if some of that suspension stiffness I felt with the LT might be attributed to riding it later in the day, after being a bit more tired. This is a big reason why I will need to test it again. I'm not sure if I'd be better of with the extra travel of the LT, compared to the SB95, but I'm getting to the point where a decision just has to be made, so I'll try them both and see what I think. It's also tough not to wonder how the Ibis Ripley will ride, after falling in love with the Mojo. A very small part of me wants to just say, "Screw it!" and go with the Mojo, but I love the 29er's overall feel more than I loved the Mojo HD.

    My gut is saying I'm gonna end up getting the SB-95, but only time will tell. There are so many bikes out there, and I don't want to ignore any, but I believe I've narrowed it down to the LT and the 95, with the Mojo HD just slightly calling my name. I believe I'll be getting an HD in the coming years regardless, so I won't sweat it for right now. Pardon if I came off as ranting. Kinda just offering some brief notes on my experience, and do feel I could've possibly went into greater detail with some of the rides. As always, feel free to chime in about anything I've mentioned you guys!

  5. #55
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    The other thing that is nice about larger travel suss bikes that I haven't seen anyone mention yet is that it opens up more options to you as far as things like Steven's pass doing lifts this year and I think Crystal is too? While it certainly wouldn't be impossible to ride it on an xc bike (I did Whistler on a Giant ATX760) its murder on your back and I don't think you really get to enjoy it unless you bomb down them.
    You're spending a good chunk of money and whatever you get, I'm sure you'll be very happy with. Good luck and have fun riding! Welcome to Washington too

  6. #56
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    Another vote for the Mission, great AM bike... and DB seems to do a lot for local riding.

  7. #57
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    Resurrecting a dead thread, I posted one a while ago and didn't get much response. I'm moving to WA and I'm getting rid of all my current bikes (2009 SX trail, Soul Cycles Dillinger rigid 29'er, Titus Switchblade, and my ancient steel road bike). I've got kids and will be in school so not tons of time or money but I'll have enough to build one mountain bike and buy a cheap roadie commuter. I'm pretty torn though between a slack 29'er hardtail like the Yelli Screamy, Nimble 9, Honzo, Taro, etc... and a lower end FS 29'er like a Satori or something similar. I do almost all my riding except resort on my rigid bike and almost all of that is fast technical singletrack including some big downhills. I've got good skills but not a big jumper.

    The only trails I've ridden in WA are the XC loops at Duthie so I'm not sure if that's a real accurate sample of what's around. Duthie, Tokul, Tiger are within striking distance and Tapeworm is pretty close so those places are where I'll be doing most of my riding.

    I guess my question is more about the trails, I've read on the Evergreen MTB site and I'm not sure how to interpret the trails info. Is Duthie pretty representative? If so I'll get a rigid or hardtail if it's much much gnarlier like NS/Whistler (non-resort) then I'll probably opt for the FS bike. HELP! I'm not moving till August and no time to ride till then but I can't help obsessing.

  8. #58
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    Duthie isn't an accurate sample of what is around the area. All of the trails are super smooth and buffed due to all of the traffic. Tokul and tiger are definitely less smooth and together around the edges. There are parts that are pretty smooth, but generally speaking I think some suspension is worth it in those two areas.

    Why do you want to get rid of your bikes? I would keep the sx trail and see how to like riding that bike put here.

  9. #59
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    Duthie is smoother and has more flow features than most of the trails I ride. I didn't start wanting rear suspension until I moved to Bellingham but now that I have it, I like it at Duthie and Tiger too. I haven't ridden Tapeworm or Tokul since getting the new bike.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #60
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    The XC portions of Duthie are 'easy mode' trail conditions. The descents on tiger are a little more rocky/rooty but I ride a hardtail/SS (Kona Raijin) there. Tokul is about the same (maybe mellower) and so is grand ridge.

    I personally think you'd be fine on a full rigid but it depends on your speed, tolerance for chatter, fitness, etc... You can always get a fork later if you need to, but hardtail is just fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by chugachjed View Post
    Resurrecting a dead thread, I posted one a while ago and didn't get much response. I'm moving to WA and I'm getting rid of all my current bikes (2009 SX trail, Soul Cycles Dillinger rigid 29'er, Titus Switchblade, and my ancient steel road bike). I've got kids and will be in school so not tons of time or money but I'll have enough to build one mountain bike and buy a cheap roadie commuter. I'm pretty torn though between a slack 29'er hardtail like the Yelli Screamy, Nimble 9, Honzo, Taro, etc... and a lower end FS 29'er like a Satori or something similar. I do almost all my riding except resort on my rigid bike and almost all of that is fast technical singletrack including some big downhills. I've got good skills but not a big jumper.

    The only trails I've ridden in WA are the XC loops at Duthie so I'm not sure if that's a real accurate sample of what's around. Duthie, Tokul, Tiger are within striking distance and Tapeworm is pretty close so those places are where I'll be doing most of my riding.

    I guess my question is more about the trails, I've read on the Evergreen MTB site and I'm not sure how to interpret the trails info. Is Duthie pretty representative? If so I'll get a rigid or hardtail if it's much much gnarlier like NS/Whistler (non-resort) then I'll probably opt for the FS bike. HELP! I'm not moving till August and no time to ride till then but I can't help obsessing.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider View Post
    Why do you want to get rid of your bikes? I would keep the sx trail and see how to like riding that bike put here.
    The reasoning behind getting rid of the bikes is to avoid shipping anything. We are trying to make it down south there with pretty much only clothes, I'm only bringing 2 pairs of skis! I almost never ride the SX trail anymore and I will probably only have VA health insurance while we are living there so I'll be trying not to really push it although I'm going to build one bike that can do what my rigid bike can do as well as most of what my SX can do.

    Quote Originally Posted by big_slacker View Post
    I personally think you'd be fine on a full rigid but it depends on your speed, tolerance for chatter, fitness, etc... You can always get a fork later if you need to, but hardtail is just fine.
    I'm leaning hard towards the Yelli Screamy with suspension fork.

    For reference these are some of the trails I ride on my rigid bike.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ttsud7D_po8 Most of the gnar is cut out of this one because they did an out and back instead of all the way through. And those guys are pretty darn slow.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mo23JEk_90

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziSrx5DrkTs
    This one is in my backyard, usually ride this one on the SX but I've been seen riding it more on my rigid 29'er lately.

  12. #62
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    It's always ended up costing me a little short of $200 to ship a bike. I keep thinking I'm going to figure out how to do it better, but one way or another...

    Anyway, I think it's good to have a figure in mind to compare to the hit you take on selling and repurchasing. My bottom line is that next time I ship things to myself in a move, I'm going to get rid of any 'B' bikes, more so bikes I don't ride, but I'd probably keep my two favorites.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    It's always ended up costing me a little short of $200 to ship a bike. I keep thinking I'm going to figure out how to do it better, but one way or another...

    Anyway, I think it's good to have a figure in mind to compare to the hit you take on selling and repurchasing. My bottom line is that next time I ship things to myself in a move, I'm going to get rid of any 'B' bikes, more so bikes I don't ride, but I'd probably keep my two favorites.
    This is sort of my thinking. At this point the SX trail is a B bike and my only A bike is the rigid. I'm ready for something new and that's part of my motivation to change it up, that and going from a house to a little apartment space is going to be a concern.

  14. #64
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    Would a Nomad be too much bike? I'm out of control I can't decide between a hardtail 29'r and a 6" AM/trail bike.

  15. #65
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    A nomad would be a really fun bike around here. For the bigger local rides, especially those long, higher elevation rides only doable in summer, suspension is really nice to have. Change the personality of that bike with lighter or burlier rubber depending on your mood.

    There are some amazing rides around here where you'll have more fun slightly over-biked than under-biked. Rides like Palissades, Xanadu, Kachess, Angels Staircase, heck, even local spots like Tiger or Tokul.

    If I was deciding between hardtail and Nomad, the 'mad would be a quick and easy decision. I love my SS hardtail, but not on our longer rides.
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  16. #66
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    I think a 5"-6" bike is plenty for pretty much everything around here.
    A HT 29er is fun in the winter or if you mainly stick to the lowland stuff that consists of a lot of roots and rolling terrrain, but on the bigger summer stuff a good full squish bike really opens thing up.
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  17. #67
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    I think the best advice in this thread was to try some bikes you can afford and see what YOU prefer. Many of us posting here ride together, or at least ride the same trails, yet have totally different preferences. The one common theme is we all seem to recommend what we personally prefer!

    It is really not much use to compare a 30lb FS bike (>$4k+?) to a 30lb steel singlespeed hardtail (<$2k?). I am not taking sides here, just pointing out that budget probably makes a bigger difference than wheelsize or suspension technology.

    You can get a rad slack AM hardtail with a dropper post now for just over $1k. Any FS bike at that pricepoint would be garbage. But yeah, if you have $3k+ to spend than FS is a no-brainer (regardless of wheelsize)

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM View Post
    It is really not much use to compare a 30lb FS bike (>$4k+?) to a 30lb steel singlespeed hardtail (<$2k?). I am not taking sides here, just pointing out that budget probably makes a bigger difference than wheelsize or suspension technology.
    FM doesn't know what he's talking about. My old, heavy, steel 26" SS is WAY better than his geared 29er ti hardtail. Way better. Any day. No comparison.
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  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by juice View Post
    FM doesn't know what he's talking about. My old, heavy, steel 26" SS is WAY better than his geared 29er ti hardtail. Way better. Any day. No comparison.
    Well yeah, for lowland stuff that consists of a lot of roots and rolling terrrain, I agree.

    Seriously though.... it is so personal. I had a great run down mission ridge on my hardtail last week!

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    Ha, that is what it all boils down to. Preference... I'd love to get down there and demo a little, ride the trails and see what kind of bike I want.


    but... I also might drive down from Alaska and there are some seriously amazing trail systems on the way (sorta) Whitehorse, pemberton, squamish, vancouver. Not sure the wife would like that much but her and the kids are flying down so there's not much she can say about it. At least until I arrive 5 days late. I've been strongly considering a Specialized Enduro 29, I could get it locally maybe on sale in August and drive/ride my way down south. I've had great luck with Spesh in the past but I'd like to patronize a smaller boutique company like Canfield, Transition, et al. Too many choices, and it really all depends on how much I make in tips this summer.


    Anybody coming to Alaska? Want to go fishing on the salt water in Seward? I'm a captain/guide.

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