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  1. #1
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    For Grand Ridge riders...

    For those who need reminding (granted, there are not many), I thought Id review the correct way to conduct yourself when riding Grand Ridge:

    - Do NOT yield to uphill riders, or any riders. Force others to yield to you at all times.
    - Do NOT say thank you or smile when others yield to you. Simply ride past them with no acknowledgment, even when they say hi. For extra credit, try a grumpy frown.
    - Do NOT watch for other riders around the blind corners. Assume they will see you first and pull over.
    - Always bring your unleashed dog. Like Duthie, Grand Ridge is a lightly used off-leash area.
    - Try to ride in groups that are as large as possible. Needless to say, there is nothing more pleasing than having to yield on an uphill in order to be informed that there are 6 more riders coming, spread out at lengthy intervals, who will also not yield.
    - If you see trail workers, do NOT dismount from your bike. Bomb through the work area as fast as possible without speaking.

    I have noticed that the Grand Ridge environment is unique in that nearly everyone instinctively abides by these rules. However, there are still occasional holdouts who insist on yielding or smiling at other riders. This behavior will NOT be tolerated. Remember, we are here for a climbing workout and to show off our glistening spandexed buttocks, not to have a good time. If we all work together, we can make Grand Ridge a truly annoying experience for everyone. Thank you.
    "Careful. We don't want to learn from this." -- Calvin & Hobbes

  2. #2
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    I was thinking about writing up something like this but you did a way better job than I would have.

    On the hike out from yesterdays work party we noticed that some riders can't make the corners, if you want straight trails go ride logging roads. Also saw some tracks going off some turnpike into the swamp. Maybe we should set up a video camera to watch and laugh at the crashes.

    You should also add toe the list:
    Always make sure to use your rear brake on bumpy downhills so you burn up the trail as you skid over the bumps pissing off the volunteers and making MTBers look like morons.

    Complain about the work that gets done but don't do any yourself.

    If you want to ride fast, ride your road bike, the cars don't care and if you're afraid of cars take a spin class.

    THERE COULD BE POLITICAL PROBLEMS IF THIS BEHAVIOR CONTINUES AND YOU KNOW THAT'S JUST WHAT WE NEED.
    There's a big difference between ripping and skidding. Those who skid don't know how to ride.

  3. #3
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    I have to disagree with these posts in part. While I've definitely seen some lack of courtesy on Grand Ridge (same as everywhere else I've ever ridden), the vast majority of riders out there do follow basic rules of the road. I ride this trail a minimum of once a week year round and only very occasionally see someone fail to yield. Maybe it is a disagreement of when yielding is necessary. Much if not most of the trail provides plenty of space for riders to pass each other without stopping. I, for one, do not believe the right of way rules dictate the downhill rider pull off to the side if the trail is more than wide enough for two (I'm talking plenty of room, not two people squeezing by hoping they don't knock handle bars). If someone is getting in a twist because they want to take up the entire trail even though it is easily wide enough for two if you'd just pull over a little, I think they need to think again about what it means to share the trail. I do pull off when going downhill no matter what, but when I'm going up hill and there is plenty of space for us both then I don't have an issue if the downhill rider doesn't pull off for me. The blind corners are the only thing I'd agree with you that quite a few people out there should slow down a little. I like the dogs out there and have never seen a dog behaving badly on Grand Ridge. I think it's awesome to see how excited the dogs are to be out there running the trails with their buddy. Btw, the work crew did a fantastic job this past weekend. I was out there today and was amazed at how nice the spot near the middle bridge is compared to what it was like before the first work party (which I was on).

  4. #4
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    A general note:
    Please don't forget while you may be comfortable with your speed others like hikers or new rides may not.
    Haven't had problem with dogs yet but other may have.
    I always go early, traffic doesn't pick up until about noon. Is that when the hangovers wear off?
    There's a big difference between ripping and skidding. Those who skid don't know how to ride.

  5. #5
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    Staying with the spirit of the OP... New riders should be too intimidated to ride the scene that is Grand Ridge.
    - Be Someone

  6. #6
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    it would be pretty cool if we could make GR a loop trail...

  7. #7
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    Yep. One way too. Like Doofie XC trails.

  8. #8
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    Yes, and all DH both ways too, no hills to climb.

  9. #9
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    Duthie xc trails are one way? That explains a lot...

  10. #10
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    In all seriousness; my dogs love riding and they have great trail etiquette (better than a lot of people).
    I'm honestly a bit puzzled by the disapproval of mtb dogs, outside of Duthie (dogs at Duthie does seem inappropriate to me).

  11. #11
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    If you had a bad run in or been bitten by a random dog before than you would understand why people get freaked out by it when they run into a dog that's unleashed and usually way outside of their owners reach....

  12. #12
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    Seems valid-ish. Hopefully my guys can act as "puppy ambassadors" to those bitten, or to those who just like to hate.

  13. #13
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    A loop up to the water tower is in the long term plan but this is a multi use trail so it will always be 2 way. WTA and the county are aware of the speeders so any new trail is built to slow people down.
    There's a big difference between ripping and skidding. Those who skid don't know how to ride.

  14. #14
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    The old trails used to have large rocks, mud and logs to keep squids in check, hmmm, maybe someday the new sustainable trails may have traffic calming features to keep speeds down for the unskilled...

  15. #15
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    Would the county allow chicanes and choke points to be built on the downhills to tamp speeds down?

  16. #16
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    The thing about unleashed dogs is that, while you know your dog would never hurt anyone, I don't know that. And the two times I've been bitten (not while riding), the dog owners were surprised that it happened. I love dogs! I want to pet them all! They are so cute!! But twice bitten, once shy... until I know they're safe, which means slowing down and talking to them and feeling afraid for a few seconds. Plus, I once had a small dog literally run RIGHT into my front wheel -- zero time to avoid it -- and not only was the resulting yard sale unpleasant but I was really worried about the dog too. Leash laws on public trails protect dog owners, other trail users, and the dogs themselves. 99% of the time there are no problems, but you never know if today will be the day the 1% happens.

    On the other hand, life is risky and I know it's hard to ride a bike with a dog on a leash. So I would propose that those wanting to ride with their pups just maybe try to avoid heavy use areas like Duthie and Grand Ridge, especially during busy times like weekends.

    I didn't mean to start a big debate with my original post, I just thought it was funny how I keep seeing this certain attitude at Grand Ridge and nowhere else that I ride. Maybe I'll just try to think of it as part of GR's unique charm.
    "Careful. We don't want to learn from this." -- Calvin & Hobbes

  17. #17
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    It's cuz their all so jacked up on their Starbucks.
    Last edited by mtbty; 03-19-2013 at 11:32 PM.
    Epic trails get built in the Northwest by epic people!

    Sustainable quality trails please.

  18. #18
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    GR seems like strava central nowadays and the d-bag factor has gone up there too. Off hours are the best there and at other busy places.

  19. #19
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    Re: For Grand Ridge riders...

    Today it was my turn. Up I went on a Tuesday into the approaching storm ready to brisk by anyone likely faster than moi.

    I was gonna stake my claim as a trail bustin' bruiser to be reckoned with.

    So I go to the worksite after hefting in a pack full of rocks and three loads to go worried someone may try to pass me as I unload the rocks at their intended destination. I even worry about my pack as I stash it under a fern and bomb down ingloriously to the clay corner and down to what I am calling the middle bridge.

    I turned around ready to lean into anyone with a decided nonchalance while climbing back up.

    It did not happen. Woe I hammered forth and without any incumberance except the wind in the trees. Oh and the climb up the clay corner was precise even with the dewy mist upon the newly hewn stones.

    So I tried to follow the protocol but I didn't have anyone to annoy so ill have to try again soon.

    Great timing for this benchmark post.

    I strava don't you?

  20. #20
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    I think the only thing different about Grand Ridge compared to most other places is that there isn't an easier way and a harder way (or a way that is obviously more fun) to naturally result in most everyone going a certain direction.

    For example, at Tiger, for every person that goes up NW Timber, then Preston, then the Summit Trail, then down the road to parking, there are 50 that go the other direction (and thank god for that. The last thing I want to do on Preston is stop for someone).

    Same with Tokul. How many times do you see someone ride up any of the trails that drop onto the SVT? Instead, everyone rides up the road to get to the fun downhill riding. When was the last time anyone went up flowtron?

    At Grand Ridge, if there was an easier way to go south, then that's what most people would choose to do, eliminating the opportunity for conflict between riders (hikers would still have a problem though). Since there isn't, the opportunity for conflict is vastly greater at GR than most other places.

    The idea that the riders are somehow different at Grand Ridge compared to everywhere else doesn't seem realistic to me.

    Again, I'm on GR at least weekly, and the negative things that have been described are not reflective of my experience. Except in the middle of summer, it is far more common to have the trail almost to myself than it is to have crowds of people out there.

  21. #21
    JRA
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    Would the county allow chicanes and choke points to be built on the downhills to tamp speeds down?
    WHAT!?! ... and ruin the flow!?! Sacrilege!

  22. #22
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    The other problem w/ loose dogs is that they can piss of the wildlife. I don't know about cougars but I've seen bob cat and bear tracks.
    There's a big difference between ripping and skidding. Those who skid don't know how to ride.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRA View Post
    WHAT!?! ... and ruin the flow!?! Sacrilege!
    LOL, maybe so!

    We had a similar problem on the Southern Traverse Trail at Paradise...a straight downhill section, where it's easy to really get moving, followed by an abrupt somewhat blind corner. We were seeing tire tracks off the trail into the bushes, stutter bumps forming and hikers were complaining to the County about those crazy bikers. At Borneo's suggestion (and with his help) we put a chicane into the trail just before the corner and that has pretty much resolved the problems. Actually makes the trail a little more fun to ride IMHO.

  24. #24
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    thanks for the info on how to act at grand ridge. Should i have my I-pod on at full volume so I cant hear anything including the nature I originally went out to see. All kidding aside, I have never been out there before. how are the weekday mornings? i want to ride out there but now you guys got me worried if i pushing up a hill cause I'm fat and way out of shape ill catch hell form the locals. one last thing where do i park? I ask cause I read in another thread ( Grand Ridge/Duthie RR) that people are getting pissed about where people are parking.
    Last edited by mrosey; 03-31-2013 at 08:42 PM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteNW View Post
    In all seriousness; my dogs love riding and they have great trail etiquette (better than a lot of people).
    I'm honestly a bit puzzled by the disapproval of mtb dogs, outside of Duthie (dogs at Duthie does seem inappropriate to me).
    Well, for a King Country property such as Grand Ridge and/or Duthie, leashes are law, which I'll be all too ready and willing to remind people of. If you're caught; and people have been caught; it's a big ticket (IIRC $325 or some such).

    Disapproval comes from the significant danger dogs pose when off leash on a densely used trails such as Grand Ridge or Duthie. And sorry, no, your dog is probably just as bad as any other off-leash dog .

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