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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Something all should read and respond to -

    A renewed effort by the American Hiking Society to further restrict access to all other user groups (but foot traffic)

    This is their home page - American Hiking Society | Because you HIKE, we're with you every step of the way.American Hiking Society - see top two articles.

    This is their position statement - (I've sent my email to AHS, you should too!)

    "Mountain Bike Position Statement

    Philosophy

    Hiking trails, or foot-only trails, are pathways developed and managed for quiet, slow travel and the enjoyment of nature away from mechanical conveyances, including bicycles. American Hiking Society is dedicated to the preservation and protection of foot-only trails as an important resource for the hiking public. Multi-purpose trails, which address a variety of recreation needs, may accommodate both foot and bicycle travel, provided the trails recognize a primary designated use, are managed for that use, and are designed to protect the interest of hikers. American Hiking Society is devoted to the interests of hikers and the creation and protection of trails that serve hikers. Foot-only trails offer the best opportunity to design sustainable trails that best meet the unique needs of hikers and provide them with the highest quality experiences. Where there are multi-purpose trail systems or corridors, American Hiking supports the development and stewardship of some foot-only trails within those systems to avoid displacement and user conflict.

    American Hiking seeks to work cooperatively with mountain bicycle organizations, and encourages cooperative trail planning and stewardship at the local level between hikers and bicyclists. Inherent in this spirit of cooperation is the position that the experience of hiking and the interest of hiking constituents must vigilantly be protected, whether on foot trails or multipurpose trails suitable to hikers. Where the interests of hikers cannot be guaranteed in a multipurpose trail system, foot-only trails must be incorporated and protected.

    Policy

    The American Hiking Society supports the principle of managing trails for the primary purposes for which they are designated. Other uses and types of travel should be evaluated for their impact on the primary use and purpose of the trail.

    Trail designations should be based upon the collective input of all stakeholders, which may include local users, American Hiking Society, and other national groups when dealing with federal lands, as well as any attendant resource concerns. In issues involving local and state trails, American Hiking may defer to the local hiking constituency. When requested by a local hiking constituency, American Hiking may assist on behalf of hikers or intervene to mitigate conflict. Particularly in matters pertaining to federal land, American Hiking may speak on behalf of hikers at large, particularly where the hiking constituency is not organized.

    American Hiking Society opposes the use of mountain bicycles in designated wilderness areas and areas under consideration for wilderness designation. AHS supports the current National Park Service policy for bicycle route designation [36 CFR 4.30], requiring a written determination and/or special regulation stating that bicycle use is consistent with the protection of a park area’s natural, scenic, and aesthetic values, safety considerations and management objectives, and will not disturb wildlife or park resources.

    Hiker-Biker Trail Guidelines

    Additional guidance is provided for evaluating the acceptability of multi-purpose trail proposals accommodating foot and bicycle travel. American Hiking Society supports the following design and management criteria.

    Safety:Trails should be designed to allow for safe passage of one traveler by another, and provide for adequate visibility to avoid collisions. Design should account for varying speeds of travel. Existing trails require evaluation of the need for vegetation clearing or rerouting to ensure adequate visibility.

    Environmental Protection: Trail surfaces should be designed to sustain all allowed uses under all conditions, or be managed with provisions that protect against environmental damage and erosion under certain conditions. Existing trails require evaluation of the need for trail widening, relocations, and removal or modification of tread drainage features, steps, bridges and other potential barriers to bicycle use--modifications that can compromise the experience of hikers. Additional resource protection measures may also be needed to sustain bicycle use on wet soils, at stream crossings, and along steeper trail grades. Evaluations should consider the acceptability of these changes to hikers, particularly when adding bicycle use to foot trails.

    The Experience of Hiking: Trails developed for multiple uses should be designed with consideration given to the needs and concerns of people traveling on foot. Research has demonstrated the potential for conflicts between hikers and bicyclists, particularly at higher levels of use and rates of speed.

    Adopted by the American Hiking Society Board of Directors: April 14, 2007

    Download a Copy of the AHS Mountain Bike Policy"

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SManZ's Avatar
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    Sent my piece. Douchebags...
    I have a black belt in MS Paint.

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  3. #3
    CrgCrkRyder
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    "American Hiking seeks to work cooperatively with mountain bicycle organizations, and encourages cooperative trail planning and stewardship at the local level between hikers and bicyclists. Inherent in this spirit of cooperation is the position that the experience of hiking and the interest of hiking constituents must vigilantly be protected, whether on foot trails or multipurpose trails suitable to hikers. Where the interests of hikers cannot be guaranteed in a multipurpose trail system, foot-only trails must be incorporated and protected."

    Think mighty highly of themselves. First they tout cooperation, but then immediately say screw u if we don't get our way.
    They already have essentially all the national parks and all the wilderness areas, lets go for all the National Forest multi-use trails. They will get no friends on here.
    http://s227.photobucket.com/albums/dd66/CraigCreekRider
    Its Jake - From State Farm. What are you wearing?

  4. #4
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
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    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

  5. #5
    CrgCrkRyder
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit View Post
    Hahaha Good one.
    http://s227.photobucket.com/albums/dd66/CraigCreekRider
    Its Jake - From State Farm. What are you wearing?

  6. #6
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    Something all should read and respond to -

    Based on all the hate this post is getting on Facebook, I imagine IMBA's board of directors are cackling at all the donations they're getting.

  7. #7
    CrgCrkRyder
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    Quote Originally Posted by PantslessWithWolves View Post
    Based on all the hate this post is getting on Facebook, I imagine IMBA's board of directors are cackling at all the donations they're getting.

    You are right about that. I just checked it out https://www.facebook.com/#!/AmericanHiking
    Looks like mountain bikers have jumped all over this one. Most folks are pointing out the selfish motives of AHS. Also, AHS knows full well that most all mult-use trails that we all ride -hike - horseback on were not designed for biking as mountain bikes did not exist then. They make a big point about how they are willing to share trails that were designed with mountain biking in mind. I doubt if these trails were designed for vibram soles either, maybe they should be banned in favor of mocassins. Ever seen how much mud a pair of vibrams can pick up out of a trail?
    Out in the national forest we ride mult-use trails all the time and have almost no conflict issues. What makes a great hiking trail does not necessarily make a great biking trail - and vise versa. I have had more trail conflicts with bear than people.
    http://s227.photobucket.com/albums/dd66/CraigCreekRider
    Its Jake - From State Farm. What are you wearing?

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