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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Straight Blade Fork Question?

    Is there an advantage to having a straight blade fork like the Potts Type 2 or Tange Switchblade style fork opposed to the raked fork.

    I picked up a Rocky Mountain that had a Fox shock on it, i know its a newer bike with disc setup but i see the most bikes in the VRC with the straight forks and they look nice. I had a old Tange BigFork laying around that i decided to put on the Rocky to have older look to it and put a threaded headset and building it up with some old and new parts. Also putting Vbrakes on it as well because i like the vintage stuff.
    1985 Ritchey Timber Comp
    1985 Ritchey Ascent
    1987 Ritchey Timberwolf

  2. #2
    the new Gilbert Grape
    Reputation: laffeaux's Avatar
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    Straight versus curved fork legs is 99% about what looks best to the builder/buyer. Functionally, as long as the rake and axle-to-crown lengths are identical they will function the same. In theory, a curved blade can flex a bit more (if the tubing diameter is small enough), and a straight blade fork is marginally stiffer (as it takes the most direct route from the frame to the wheel); however, the differences are minor and tubing choice makes more difference than the shape of the legs. Pick the fork style that looks best on your bike.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  3. #3
    Schipperkes are cool.
    Reputation: banks's Avatar
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    much easier to see when bent
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux View Post
    Straight versus curved fork legs is 99% about what looks best to the builder/buyer. Functionally, as long as the rake and axle-to-crown lengths are identical they will function the same. In theory, a curved blade can flex a bit more (if the tubing diameter is small enough), and a straight blade fork is marginally stiffer (as it takes the most direct route from the frame to the wheel); however, the differences are minor and tubing choice makes more difference than the shape of the legs. Pick the fork style that looks best on your bike.
    thanks, i think they do look better so i will stick with it.
    1985 Ritchey Timber Comp
    1985 Ritchey Ascent
    1987 Ritchey Timberwolf

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