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  1. #1
    RIDE
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    Shogun Prairie Breaker Pro (1987?)

    Here's a current restoration project. The cables,chain and BB were shot but everything else works fine.It has all original Deore.This is a 19" frame.

    Who gets the credit for the triple triangle frame? I know GT came out with the K2 All Terra in 1987 or 88. I do know Nashbar sold a TT bike with a triple triangle in 1986.
    Last edited by Built4Speed; 10-17-2006 at 06:39 AM.
    'Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death'
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  2. #2
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Triple Triangle Question

    So, how far ahead of the seat tube do the stays have to attach to qualify as triple triangle?
    *** --- *** --- ***

  3. #3
    RIDE
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    Uh,is that a trick question?

    You got me there.

    No seriously,if Cunningham (does he?) gets the credit for the elevated chainstay design,who came up with the idea of this frame design? What about wish bone rear stays and straight blade forks of 1989/90? Inquiring minds want to know.Seems like a lot of stuff came out good and bad in the early years.
    I'm just interested in vintage mountain bike frame designs.
    'Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death'
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  4. #4
    VRC Hound
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    Check out the triple-triangle on this mid-80s Fat Chance! I think Chris Chance is behind the triple-triangle.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MEDW%3AIT&rd=1

  5. #5
    mwr
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    You guys are off by at least a few decades

    http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Bri...hanet_home.htm

  6. #6
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    I went to bike show in a history museum and was surprised that almost everything that we see today was invented by around 1900, including clipless pedals.

  7. #7
    RIDE
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    Yeah,way off!

    Quote Originally Posted by mwr
    You guys are off by at least a few decades

    http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Bri...hanet_home.htm
    Thanks.
    'Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death'
    http://fotki.com/vintagemtbr/

    Joe R.

  8. #8
    Neo-Retro Forever
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    Shogun Prarie Breaker Pro and Team Issue were 1987 bikes...

    Reviewed in June 1987 MBA if I recall correctly..

    rb.

  9. #9
    IVMTB & VMBEFG Illuminati
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwr
    You guys are off by at least a few decades

    http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Bri...hanet_home.htm
    come on MWR, those aren't bikes. they have skinny little tires. Doug Lexington told me those are called Roadies.

  10. #10
    RIDE
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    Good job! Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by richieb
    Shogun Prarie Breaker Pro and Team Issue were 1987 bikes...

    Reviewed in June 1987 MBA if I recall correctly..

    rb.
    The colors were the hint of this bike being an '87 model. The U-brake and curved fork were other clues too.Thanks for the help.
    'Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death'
    http://fotki.com/vintagemtbr/

    Joe R.

  11. #11
    Neo-Retro Forever
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    Correction, actually...with the Shark Tooth on the U brake, I think maybe an 88...

    rb

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built4Speed
    Here's a current restoration project.

    Until it was stolen years ago, my wife owned a small 1987 Prairie Breaker Pro that was maybe one of the first WSDs--it used a 24" front wheel. Those colors attracted hummingbirds at Crested Butte. *laugh* If I recall correctly, the fork is Tange Prestige cromoly. Nice bike! My brother still owns a Team Issue--it's all Prestige.

  13. #13
    RIDE
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    It is a 1987 model.

    I found the serial number under some crust.DS870508-3.Thanks for the comments and help.
    'Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death'
    http://fotki.com/vintagemtbr/

    Joe R.

  14. #14
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    The bike is definately an '88 Prairie Breaker Pro. I just made some scans of the '87 and '88 Shogun catalogs. The first is the '87 Pro and the second is the '88 Pro (note the addition of chrome-plating, among other things). I also included the '87 Team Issue as I owned one and would love to find another (ya'll keep your eyes out). Hope this helps.



  15. #15
    RIDE
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    Good job! Mystery solved then...

    Those are great scans.That is my bike. I was able to ride it yesterday but with a Suntour XC Pro rear derailluer with billet pulley wheels.I'll reinstall the Deore when it's cleaned up.
    Thanks for the scans.
    'Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death'
    http://fotki.com/vintagemtbr/

    Joe R.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by datawhacker
    I went to bike show in a history museum and was surprised that almost everything that we see today was invented by around 1900, including clipless pedals.
    The Forney Museum in Denver has a pretty good lineup of turn of the century (that one) bikes. There is a Columbia with a softtail design that Moots stole, a suspension fork, and shaft drive that runs inside the chainstay. I'm still waiting for the shaft drive to reappear.

  17. #17
    RIDE
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    I think there is a bike with the shaft drive. I think it's called a Iomega or something like that.
    As for the Shogun, it has the shortest wheelbase for a 19" frame at 41",compared to my other bikes which run around 41.5".So it'll be interesting to see how it'll handle on switchbacks.
    'Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death'
    http://fotki.com/vintagemtbr/

    Joe R.

  18. #18
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    They had very short top tubes. The top tube on my old 18" Team Issue was like 20.5" center to center, coupled with a 71 degree head angle (and prereq. 135mm T-Bone stem), made for a very quick handling bike. Great on singletracks--not so much on downhills, but then again this was before suspension so DH wasn't my focus.

  19. #19
    maciam
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    ... and if we just ...

    Check out my post...
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...76143#poststop
    I FOUND !!!!!!! a 1988 Prairie Breaker Team Issue in my neighbors junk pile that was put out as trash for our garbage company to pick up.

  20. #20
    Dumpster Diver
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built4Speed
    I think there is a bike with the shaft drive. I think it's called a Iomega or something like that.
    As for the Shogun, it has the shortest wheelbase for a 19" frame at 41",compared to my other bikes which run around 41.5".So it'll be interesting to see how it'll handle on switchbacks.
    I do remember seeing a two wheel drive bike that had a flex cable attached to a gear driven front hub in the late 80's, early 90's.I forget the name of the bike.
    Stuart

    wanted: TA Chainrings, FUNK Big Fork, Bullseye Cranks 176mm,

  21. #21
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    Koichi Yamaguchi when he was at 3Rensho back in the what f-in 70s should be credited for the triple triangle design.

  22. #22
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    Oops. my bad. I didn't see that someone posted a link to a French bike from like 1940something that has something that looks like the triple triangle.

  23. #23
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    I remember seeing the prairie breaker pro in
    Mountain bike action mag. Drooled over it except the chain stay u brake.
    The following year my LBS started carrying GT bikes. I then bought a GT Karakoram with seat stay mounted u brake.
    I still have the bike in minty but upgraded condition.
    Added scot At4 bars , odyssey seat post pump sealed bottom bracket and gorilla headset And salsa stem.
    Also replaced derailleurs with Deore vs mountain LX..
    Now I have an updated Gt idrive 5
    Love the GT
    It is my city bike now.
    " I only Ride Enduro'

  24. #24
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    Here it is
    " I only Ride Enduro'

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