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  1. #1
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    Schwinn Homegrown Frame Date?

    The serial number begins 96B.. does this indicate 1996? Any experts out there?

  2. #2
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    Okay, I'm bringing this thread back, if thats ok... the only reason is I think this came from the Schwinn Project Underground scheme.







    I've determined this is a '96, or at least thats when the dropout was stamped. The only reason I think its from the PU scheme is because of the paint. From what I've learned (from FirstFlightBikes), the Schwinn PU was to redevelop the company name within the high end MTB market in the mid-nineties. All of the frames I've seen were made of thermoplastic, carbon, and had featured ti dropouts (or so I've heard). I've seen no other PU frame painted anything other than bassboat blue. Now, this has none and its made of standard aluminum. However, no one can figure the paint out. This was painted bassboat purple, and I've never seen its mate.

    Come on, someone here has to know. Thanks!

  3. #3
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    I don't know, but that frame looks like it could use some love and attention.
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  4. #4
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    Several 'Bassboat' Colours

    While I've never seen purple it isn't beyond the realm of possibility.
    I've seen gold, red, blue, and green 'Bassboat' schemes on Schwinns.

    Project Underground was the name of the carbon/thermoplastic frame. That's it. It wasn't a 'movement' or anything. They were garbage IMO.
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  5. #5
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    That frame doesn't look like a Schwinn, The area behind the bottom bracket doesn't look like a schwinn at all. I own a 98' ....................... nope nothing like it! Are you sure it's a Schwinn?

  6. #6
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    mmm .... sparkly

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sedated
    That frame doesn't look like a Schwinn, The area behind the bottom bracket doesn't look like a schwinn at all. I own a 98' ....................... nope nothing like it! Are you sure it's a Schwinn?
    I'm positive its a Homegrown... I've got the catalogs from those years and its identical. The current debate is how to determine what Homegrowns were made at Yeti and which weren't. The current theory is there's no way to tell. Any thoughts?

  8. #8
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    Looks exactly like a schwinn to me. Perhaps yours isn't really a schwinn, but the original poster's definitely is.

    You can still get new homegrown frames on ebay. See this auction...

    http://cgi.ebay.com/2000-SCHWINN-HOM...QQcmdZViewItem

    Note the closeup pic of the area behind the BB of the chainstays.

    <img src="http://imagehost.vendio.com/bin/imageserver.x/00000000/benscycle/homegrown_red_15_b.JPG">

    Note how its identical to the above purple evilness.
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  9. #9
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    Its My Understanding That...

    only the Team or Pro or whatever the top of the line Homegrown was was built at the Yeti facility. I could be wrong. That was 10 years ago and I haven't kept up on my Schwinn knowledge.

    I do know that you can visable tell the difference between a 'Yeti' and a 'Schwinn' built frame

    EDIT: Guess I was wrong. According to the 1997 Schwinn catalogue 'all Homegrowns are handbuilt in Durango'
    Last edited by Shayne; 01-17-2007 at 09:02 AM.
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  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=I do know that you can visable tell the difference between a 'Yeti' and a 'Schwinn' built frame[/QUOTE]

    I've heard this, but I cant find anyone that knows what the 'difference' is...

  11. #11
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Build Quality

    Its something you have to see/feel to appreciate. Generally better looking welds, more attention to detail, etc.
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  12. #12
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    My 97 Homegrown Factory XTR Bassboat Blue frame looks exactly like it. It also came in a Yeti box.

  13. #13
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    It certainly wasn't paint quality, there was a then regular poster named Jennifer Tipton (she was a helicopter traffic reporter as memory serves) who got I think it was a 98 or 99 Bassboat blue homegrown team and the paint just went totally flake job on it, and there was a missalignment issue, as well. Anyways, she kept trying to enter bad reviews of the bike regarding the frame quality issues and the lack of satisfactory resolution coming from schwinn and the reviews kept getting mysteriously deleted by some mtbr staff member for reasons never explained (though there was no doubt in any of us following the story at the time that it was to appease potential advertisers/sponsors).
    Last edited by DeeEight; 01-18-2007 at 09:01 AM.
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  14. #14
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    It was recently suggested that the key to figuring it out is in the frame decals. Simply enough, I know. Apparently, the Yeti made frame decals said "Homegrown Factory," whereas the others were just named "Homegrown." If you look at the 96 and 97 catalogs, it shows just that.

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    Here are a copy pages from the 97 Schwinn catalog showing that the Factory Homegrowns were made in Durango by Yeti and the normal homegrowns say just made in the USA. Some Homegrowns were built by ControlTech. The 95 Homegrown I had, I believe was made by ControlTech. Not sure if they built the normal ones up to 97 or not. I know after 97 the Homegrowns weren't the same. Bass Boat paint jobs looked more like assembly line work. Surface was smooth compared to the rough surface of the 97 Bass Boat paint.

  16. #16
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    Thanks for posting that! And thanks everyone for the attention to this thread.

    it defies all logic to say all Homegrown frames were built at Yeti. I've seen the factory. The infastructure there was way too small to handle the workload.

  17. #17
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    The first homegrown frames where not made by schwinn, schwinn contracted control tech to manufacture the frames here in the good old USA. Control Tech only after a year or maybe two could not produce enough bikes to cover the demand so schwinn contracted yeti to produce the homegrown and the rest is history. As far as being able to tell the difference by the weld quality thats crazy, control tech in know for their high quality aluminu products and I assure you they where top knotch. Control tech actually made a slightly lighter frame at 2.9 lbs, with the only distinct difference being the area behind the bottom bracket and the paint schemes. As an original owner of the control tech made homegrown I can say it is the best hard tail I have ever riden.

  18. #18
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    Not Really.

    Quote Originally Posted by txpgl
    As far as being able to tell the difference by the weld quality thats crazy.
    I think it is a very valid method to determine the difference between 2 of the 'same' frame made by different people.
    I've owned Control Tech built frames and I think their welds are distinct and found it easy to tell the difference between a frame they made the same frame outsourced to another company.
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  19. #19
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    I'm bringing this thread back to life too.

    So, what's the current word? Is there a way to tell definitively where the frame was built? Yeti, Taiwan, Control Tech?

    When did they officially stop making them too?
    We Ride In God's Country!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by myitch
    Is there a way to tell definitively where the frame was built? Yeti, Taiwan, Control Tech?
    This is a tough question to answer accurately...I might be the only person to have spent the time to thoroughly research it. Funny how my original posts show how much I didn't know. Homegrowns are beautiful, great riding race frames, but it pisses me off when people automatically assume their 95-2002 Homegrown was made @ Yeti in Durango simply because of the relationship.

    One Answer: None. Ex-Schwinn employees will say many, but I live in Durango, and I've spent some time in that factory. There was no way it could have efficiently produced anything else other than Yeti frames. I emailed a friend who worked there from 96-99. This is his answer:

    The only schwinn bikes that came through the doors at our factory in Durango were the higher end “homegrown” models. We got shipments of already built & painted schwinn homegrown frames. This was in late 98 for the 99 model year and we had 2 shops- 1 for yeti and 1 for schwinn. At that time the painted schwinn frames showed up at our factory and then we performed a 90% build- to ship to shops, the frames were not built or painted by us.. Some frames were boxed & shipped as “frame only” sales & some were shipped to warehouses for warranty frames. The full suspension frames were all assembled by us (rear shock, bearings, bushings, etc.) and parts will hung; the hardtails parts were hung and then everything was boxed up & shipped out by us. We were slammed just trying to do 90% builds on schwinns and build and ship yeti frames, so schwinn homegrown frames were not cut, welded, or painted by Yeti, however for what it’s worth I’m nearly positive that they were made & painted in the US- I think up in Seattle….


    Second Answer: Some. This one, my 1994 Ruthie Matthes Evian Team frame was built in Durango.

    http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...k/DSCN1057.jpg

    The influence can be seen on the ARC-style seatclamp of the time, which I've not seen on any other production Homegrown.

    A more comprehensive answer: Likely many. I hear stories from some other ex-Yeti employees of having to work on some of the aluminum project underground frames.

    In the end, I've come to the conclusion it would have been unreasonable for Schwinn to not capitalize on its resources at Yeti. Thus there were probably a handful of special frames built there. However, if you've got a stock Homegrown frame, any year, Pro, Factory, or whatever, the chances are it was built at either Anodize Inc in Portland or Control Tech in Seattle.

    Scott Sports sold Schwinn and Yeti in 1999 and Durango closed. So there was no relationship after that time. Homegrowns were probably built in Taiwan after that. I know my 2000 was.

    Now Internet forums are a famous breeding ground for people who "know" this and that about something that happened 10-20 years ago and cant back it up. One of the things I like best about this forum is there it is generally known most of the people here know what they're talking about. Now can I back up this stuff? Was I there when all this went down? No way, this is third-party information, and I'd love it if someone else with more concrete knowledge stepped forward.

  21. #21
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    I was told that the chainstay yoke on the 95?-98 on the "factory" (yeti) models is different than those on the non-factory bikes. The bikes pictured above all have squared edges on the cnc'd chainstay yokes. Supposedly the factory bikes have rounded edges (I own a rounded edge model). This is simply what I've heard. I'm no expert.

  22. #22
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    Definitely a Schwinn, definitely not an Underground. Those were the thermoplastic models only, as stated in an earlier thread. I'd lay money it's not a '96, either. I'm fairly certain the only color Homegrowns were in '96 were Blue. I don't think Purple was around until three or four years later, but I could be wrong on that.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by RocketDog
    I was told that the chainstay yoke on the 95?-98 on the "factory" (yeti) models is different than those on the non-factory bikes. The bikes pictured above all have squared edges on the cnc'd chainstay yokes. Supposedly the factory bikes have rounded edges (I own a rounded edge model). This is simply what I've heard. I'm no expert.
    I had a red 94 homegrown non-factory that came with lx/xt parts package. It came in a yeti box and the parts came in a separate box from schwinn with each part in it's original package. The chainstay yoke was the rounded version on the mattis bike but without the built in seat clamp.

  24. #24
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    Couple of comments. That is a Schwinn Homegrown with a custom paint job. There was never a Bass Boat Purple. The Schwinn Underground was also done in Aluminum. It was Schwinns re-introduction to the high-end mtb market. There were two models. The first one that was very similar to Ruthie's old bike but with a Black Phantom Paint Job Red with Black Darts, Easton tubing and non replaceable rr der. hanger. (I believe the one pictured above was not made by Yeti but rather Frank the Welder an Ex-Yeti). All of the Evian bikes were made by him. I had both Undergrounds and one of the truly last Schwinn's from the Yeti Factory. I still have it. The Schwinn Homegrown Factory's were made in Durango. and I can confirm as mentioned above have a different extrusion for the BB. (They came as a frame o xtr)

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne
    only the Team or Pro or whatever the top of the line Homegrown was was built at the Yeti facility. I could be wrong. That was 10 years ago and I haven't kept up on my Schwinn knowledge.

    I do know that you can visable tell the difference between a 'Yeti' and a 'Schwinn' built frame

    EDIT: Guess I was wrong. According to the 1997 Schwinn catalogue 'all Homegrowns are handbuilt in Durango'
    Yeti made the "Factory" versions of the Homegrown for model years '97, '98, and '99. They were all made from 7005 Easton Ultralite (Elite?), and all were painted with a two-tone Bassboat color scheme (e.g., black/gold, blue/silver, red/gold, etc). They came in two build levels - XT and XTR. Interestingly, the '99 black/gold frame uses normal paint for the black, and bassboat for the gold. The bassboat paint is pretty thick,... and heavy. I suppose they may have saved a few ounces this way.

    The regular Homegrown looks pretty much the same. They were painted in either a single-color bassboat paint, with later years using normal paint. They came in a variety of builds each with a different color and build kit. They were made of 6061 alloy and had CNC BB shells; the Factory versions used a forged piece for the BB shell.

    Long story short - if it is a single color bassboat frame - not Yeti made. If two-tone bassboat - Yeti made.

    I own a '98 (blue/silver) and '99 (black/gold) version, plus all the calalogs covering those years. ONLY in the case of the Factory frames do any of the catalogs mention that they're made in Durango. The others may say they're made in USA, or made in Colorado, but NOT Durango.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooderdude
    Yeti made the "Factory" versions of the Homegrown for model years '97, '98, and '99.
    Are they known for cracking like Yetis???

  27. #27
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    Didn't the 97+ goto that strange IS headset. Was that standard IS or schwinn specific? Also the later frames had a strange 51 mm disc mount on the chainstay... This was an early hayes standard wasn't?
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by On-One
    Didn't the 97+ goto that strange IS headset. Was that standard IS or schwinn specific? Also the later frames had a strange 51 mm disc mount on the chainstay... This was an early hayes standard wasn't?
    By IS do you mean an integrated headset? If so, that began in year 2000 with the N'Litened tubeset. Those were prone to creaking. They were not made by Yeti.

    The Homegrowns with the rear disc mount were on the 6061 frames, only, with respect to our comparisons between the Yeti-built Homegrowns vs. other US-built Homegrowns.
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  29. #29
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    OK, so are we saying the definitive answer is, there is no definitive answer?

    The frame I just picked up has two things not mentioned above, a 'Y' on the BB shell (stamped lightly, visible as its filled in with paint, but the rest of the paint has come off around it) and a couple of threaded holes in the n/s chainstay which I presume would be for a chainsuck device (although they are v small holes)

    It has the USA Tomato stickers on it, metalflake paint, a canti hanger, no disk mount, a 96B frame number and and just plain 'Homegrown' decals, not factory ones.

    I guess its too much to ask that either Yeti or Schwinn kept hold of the frame records?

  30. #30
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    Thread bump again.

    There has been some discussion lately about these frames, and while its not a Potts, Ritchey, Goat, or Ham, I think the Schwinn / Yeti relationship makes for a very interesting story. Ever since I first posted about my frame above, I've been asking as many people as possible about the Durango Homegrown connection. It seems like everyone with a Homegrown has tried to sell it on ebay with the tag "Yeti built," when it likely wasn't. The story I kept hearing was Homegrowns were built elsewhere in the US and shipping to Durango for assembly or decals. I talked to alot of former employees who rolled their eyes when I asked and talked with disdain about Schwinn's treatment of Yeti in the last years in Durango.

    Ultimately, I talked to Brett Hahn, Yeti general manager from 95-99, and he was kind enough to entertain me for awhile discussing the Schwinn / Yeti relationship and the Homegrown connection. So Brett, if you ever come across this thread, thanks This is what he had to say:

    Much of what has already been said on either Yetifan or elsewhere is true. Companies like Schwinn, GT, Trek, etc, were getting murdered in the early 90s by smaller niche companies with loyal followings. Schwinn was late to jump on the MTB bandwagon, and decided around late 93 it needed on. The sponsorship of the Evian team and the Project Underground frames ran almost parallel. FTW and Herting build most of the frames to Schwinn's specs, and once Schwinn became pleased with the result, they contracted Anodize, Inc., in Portland to make a inital run of 'Schwinn Homegrown' frames. The name was an obvious choice to gather attention to Schwinn's concern for US production. By late 94, early 95, the Homegrown brand was a hit, but Portland could not longer keep up with the demand.

    in 95, Yeti was faced with the choice many similar-sized companies had to make. Hahn describes this as nearly the same situation as FAT and Serotta. Scott Sports purchased Yeti, and the plan was to market the Yeti line as the Cadillac of its brands. The high end Schwinn bikes were to be the Chevys, and the low end Schwinn bikes were to be the GMs. Schwinn expanded the Homegrown line to include more than just one aluminum frame. This was known as "Homegrown Factory" and "Homegrown USA."



    By 96, Schwinn offered five Homegrown hardtail models, two of which were built in Durango. Hahn describes the identification is pretty simple: If it was stickered "Homegrown Factory," then it was built in Durango. If it was simply "Homegrown," it was built at either Anodize, Inc., or Control Tech in Seattle. Un-decaled bikes would be hard to distiguish as there were no established differences he was aware of. No Ys in the serial numbers or difference chainstay bridge. The one tell is is Yeti dealt with strictly 7005 aluminum, as it did not have the capacity to age the 6061 T6 tubes. This Factory Homegrowns were 7005, the lower-end models were 6061. 6061 is easier to weld so its no surprise the lower ended frames were made in the Northwest with this material.

    This process continued in 97 and 98. The Homegrown Factory XTR was the only one built in Durango. The rest of the frames came into Durango from the Northwest factories, were assembled in the case of the FS bikes, decaled, and left the factory in Yeti boxes. The relationship seemed to be twisted at this point. The Homegrowns were popular enough to compete with the Yetis, and Schwinn ran with it, effectively strangling Yeti. Yeti set up an entire separate production facility to deal with the handling of Homegrown frames coming in and leaving. This caused a strain on a lot of people. In 99, Scott Sports no longer saw Yeti as a viable brand and sold it to Volant. This is where my history lesson ended. Chris Conroy ended up with the brand at some point and seems to be doing great things with it these days. Schwinn's Homegrown line was established and continued on for another few years, with most of the frames being welded overseas. Still very nice bikes.

    According to Hahn, only a few hundred Homegrowns were built at Yeti per year, and likely less than 500 total. The Factory XTRs were not great sellers because they sold for a huge amount. Late in the 90s buyers realized they could get comparable, raceable frames for less.

    So before you go and try to sell your Homegrown on Ebay at Yeti built, do some research.

    So it turns out txpgl and scooterdude were right.

    my disclaimer: I fully understand I was not there. I'm just a guy who likes to research these things. If you have first hand info, great, post it. I'm not claiming any of this as fact.. its just what I'm told.

  31. #31
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    Good job...Grasshopper

  32. #32
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    The student has become the master. Good stuff!

  33. #33
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    Drop it guys, its only time before someone steps up and says, "no way, my dealer swore my Homegrown LX was made in Durango, so your full of S."

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ameybrook
    Thread bump again.

    There has been some discussion lately about these frames, and while its not a Potts, Ritchey, Goat, or Ham, I think the Schwinn / Yeti relationship makes for a very interesting story. Ever since I first posted about my frame above, I've been asking as many people as possible about the Durango Homegrown connection. It seems like everyone with a Homegrown has tried to sell it on ebay with the tag "Yeti built," when it likely wasn't. The story I kept hearing was Homegrowns were built elsewhere in the US and shipping to Durango for assembly or decals. I talked to alot of former employees who rolled their eyes when I asked and talked with disdain about Schwinn's treatment of Yeti in the last years in Durango.

    Ultimately, I talked to Brett Hahn, Yeti general manager from 95-99, and he was kind enough to entertain me for awhile discussing the Schwinn / Yeti relationship and the Homegrown connection. So Brett, if you ever come across this thread, thanks This is what he had to say:

    Much of what has already been said on either Yetifan or elsewhere is true. Companies like Schwinn, GT, Trek, etc, were getting murdered in the early 90s by smaller niche companies with loyal followings. Schwinn was late to jump on the MTB bandwagon, and decided around late 93 it needed on. The sponsorship of the Evian team and the Project Underground frames ran almost parallel. FTW and Herting build most of the frames to Schwinn's specs, and once Schwinn became pleased with the result, they contracted Anodize, Inc., in Portland to make a inital run of 'Schwinn Homegrown' frames. The name was an obvious choice to gather attention to Schwinn's concern for US production. By late 94, early 95, the Homegrown brand was a hit, but Portland could not longer keep up with the demand.

    in 95, Yeti was faced with the choice many similar-sized companies had to make. Hahn describes this as nearly the same situation as FAT and Serotta. Scott Sports purchased Yeti, and the plan was to market the Yeti line as the Cadillac of its brands. The high end Schwinn bikes were to be the Chevys, and the low end Schwinn bikes were to be the GMs. Schwinn expanded the Homegrown line to include more than just one aluminum frame. This was known as "Homegrown Factory" and "Homegrown USA."



    By 96, Schwinn offered five Homegrown hardtail models, two of which were built in Durango. Hahn describes the identification is pretty simple: If it was stickered "Homegrown Factory," then it was built in Durango. If it was simply "Homegrown," it was built at either Anodize, Inc., or Control Tech in Seattle. Un-decaled bikes would be hard to distiguish as there were no established differences he was aware of. No Ys in the serial numbers or difference chainstay bridge. The one tell is is Yeti dealt with strictly 7005 aluminum, as it did not have the capacity to age the 6061 T6 tubes. This Factory Homegrowns were 7005, the lower-end models were 6061. 6061 is easier to weld so its no surprise the lower ended frames were made in the Northwest with this material.

    This process continued in 97 and 98. The Homegrown Factory XTR was the only one built in Durango. The rest of the frames came into Durango from the Northwest factories, were assembled in the case of the FS bikes, decaled, and left the factory in Yeti boxes. The relationship seemed to be twisted at this point. The Homegrowns were popular enough to compete with the Yetis, and Schwinn ran with it, effectively strangling Yeti. Yeti set up an entire separate production facility to deal with the handling of Homegrown frames coming in and leaving. This caused a strain on a lot of people. In 99, Scott Sports no longer saw Yeti as a viable brand and sold it to Volant. This is where my history lesson ended. Chris Conroy ended up with the brand at some point and seems to be doing great things with it these days. Schwinn's Homegrown line was established and continued on for another few years, with most of the frames being welded overseas. Still very nice bikes.

    According to Hahn, only a few hundred Homegrowns were built at Yeti per year, and likely less than 500 total. The Factory XTRs were not great sellers because they sold for a huge amount. Late in the 90s buyers realized they could get comparable, raceable frames for less.

    So before you go and try to sell your Homegrown on Ebay at Yeti built, do some research.

    So it turns out txpgl and scooterdude were right.

    my disclaimer: I fully understand I was not there. I'm just a guy who likes to research these things. If you have first hand info, great, post it. I'm not claiming any of this as fact.. its just what I'm told.

    This is not correct, the specs clearly show the 1998 Schwinn Homegrown Factory XTR was made of 6061 T6 aluminum, butted.

    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...(02)&Type=bike

    There are several others Factory xt's & xtr; that were made of 6061 T6, while it shows reg Homegrowns made of 7005---


    Just a thought-

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by str_8_shot
    This is not correct, the specs clearly show the 1998 Schwinn Homegrown Factory XTR was made of 6061 T6 aluminum, butted.

    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...(02)&Type=bike

    There are several others Factory xt's & xtr; that were made of 6061 T6, while it shows reg Homegrowns made of 7005---


    Just a thought-
    Fortunately for us all, Bikepedia is not THE source of correct information on this particular issue (and many others, too). Your info is bass-ackwards.

    I not only have the bikes in question ('98 and '99 Factory Homegrowns), I also have the Schwinn catalogs for those years. They couldn't be any more clear: "Factory" Homegrowns are made of Easton Elite 7005. All other Homegrowns are made of 6061.

    If that's still not enough for you, take a look at the "standard" Homegrown frames; they have a 6061 sticker on them. The "standard" 6061 Homegrowns DO NOT have two-tone bassboat paint; only the Factory versions do. The "standard" versions always have a single color, whether bassboat or something else (e.g., black, red, etc.).

    Can we pu-LEEZE put this to rest now??
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    Quote Originally Posted by ameybrook
    Drop it guys, its only time before someone steps up and says, "no way, my dealer swore my Homegrown LX was made in Durango, so your full of S."
    And as if right on cue, your prophesy has come true.
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  37. #37
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    I was wondering if anyone knows what the steering stem size I need for a new shock? is it 1 1/8 or 1 1/4?

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooderdude

    Can we pu-LEEZE put this to rest now??
    Seriously

    Quote Originally Posted by aquarium101
    I was wondering if anyone knows what the steering stem size I need for a new shock? is it 1 1/8 or 1 1/4?
    1 1/8.

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    I found a # on the inside of the frame where the rear skewer goes. HW4151. Does anyone know what year this is or if it was made at Yeti? Its a big frame either large or XL. Black and Gold metal flake paint job.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by aquarium101
    I found a # on the inside of the frame where the rear skewer goes. HW4151. Does anyone know what year this is or if it was made at Yeti? Its a big frame either large or XL. Black and Gold metal flake paint job.
    Dude, did you read the above posts? If it says 6061, no, it wasn't. If it has an ORIGINAL Homegrown Factory decal, it is...the rest is up there.

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    There is no 6061 sticker on it. There are no #'s under the bottom bracket.

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    Keeping the dream alive. I gave it the sniff test. Smells more like Seattle or Portland than Durango to me..... S/N A95011297.
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    Fwiw

    I was a was a Homegrown junkie back in the day, and sold the bikes. I've owned 3.


    -'97 Homegrown XT
    -'97 Homgrown Factory Frameset (Black w/ red darts)
    -'98 Homgrown Factory XTR (Bassboat Gold & Red)

    I have the brocure for each.

    '97 XT marketing claims.
    "The same American-made frame that carried the regional expert riders of Team Homegrown to countless wins on the NORBA circuit. Features proprietary butred aluminum tubing, our patented Epicenter seat stays, and machined chain stay yoke for maximum clearance."

    '97 Factory Frame Marketing Claims
    "A 3.1 lb aluminum postcard to the rest of the world that says "Catch me if you can." Includes radically-tapered Easton Elite tubing shaped to Schwinn specifications, patented Epicenter seat stays, and forged chian stay yoke. Very rare. (BTW, mine wieghs 3.4 lb. w/ paint)

    '98 Factory XTR Marketing Claims
    "We'd love to make thousands of these beautiful Easton race bikes. Unfortuneately the process is so time consuming that it's all we can do to make a few hundred. A lighting (true typo) fast rig built at a snail's pace by perfectionist welders in Durango, Colorado."

    I also have a '96 brocure which makes no mention of Durango or Yeti and claims to have a Machined chainstay yoke.

    All three had an amazing ride. The '97 XT being the stiffest ride of the bunch, the '97 Factory Frameset being very responsive and compliant, and the '98 feeling a little softer overall. The chain stay yoke and dropouts are much different on the "Factory" frames, and obviously forged, while the other looks just like the one in the OP, more square edged.

    Yes, the Factories crack. The '97 Factory met an untimely demise after a surprise 8' drop onto pavement with the front wheel (I was crushed, best riding hardtail I've had to date...physically crushed from the incident as well), the '98 has developed a stress crack at the seat stay wishbone weld, it's my current commuter.

    So based on recent feedback from Yeti employees and my own experience with the frames I conclude the following.


    -'97 and '98 Homgrown factory frames were built by Yeti...look for a slightly smoother chainstay yoke than that in the OP (I would take a pic, but it's late at night)
    -Everything else was NOT built by Yeti
    -The '99 Factories were a completely different frame (but lighter)
    -There are NO marketing claims in '96 for either Yeti OR Durgango
    -The '97 & '98 standard Homgrowns used 6061 aluminum and machined chainstay yolk and dropouts

    PS....I hope schwinn wasn't lying, I love these bikes and it would ruin that for me.

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    This is still being debated?

    Seriously? Because you read brochures and owned three frames you can draw conclusions?

    I'm out.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by aquarium101
    I found a # on the inside of the frame where the rear skewer goes. HW4151. Does anyone know what year this is or if it was made at Yeti? Its a big frame either large or XL. Black and Gold metal flake paint job.
    A black/gold paint job, assuming the gold is the sparkly Bassboat paint, would suggest that it's a Factory bike, indeed built by Yeti out of 7005 Easton Elite. Interestingly, this is the 1st and last year where both paint colors are not Bassboat paint. The black is a standarsd paint of some sort. I imagine it was a weight savings tactic, as that sparkly paint is pretty thick.
    Wanted:

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    Thanks Scooderdude. I have a neighbor that has like 3 homegrowns and he thinks they were all built by Yeti. I was like, no I don't think so man. He has an all red one that you can really tell its a cheaper quality one, it has decals that are scratched and coming off, and there is a 6061 sticker on it. Mine the decals are like under the paint and clear coated over or something. I almost hate to ride my homegrown because they are so rare, but it's all I have, I'm going to upgrade the shock and ride it for awhile until I can afford a nice full suspension, maybe an S-Works, Yeti, or Titus.

  47. #47
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    I have a '97 hard tail XT (the non-factory) and worked at a Schwinn dealer at that time. The 6061 frames were the Control Tech (or whoever) made ones, and had harder edges on the yoke than the 7000 series Factory frames, which were lighter and made by Yeti. I can only speak to the '97 models. I still ride mine, albeit a bit changed now from when I bought it. The list on mine at the time was ~1800 but I got it for ~900 with my discount. Still kicks @ss.

  48. #48
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    Seems to me like Scooderdude has it correct. For whatever it's worth that's what I remember having worked in high volume Schwinn shops from 95 - 99. Hell, we even won that Rav 4 one year ('97?). We sold assloads of Homegrowns. I've owned quite a few, one of the aluminum project undergrounds, three thermoplastic project undergrounds and two regular homegrowns (orange and green). They were all great bikes! I always wondered if FTW had a hand in the original underground.. thx for the info.
    Full disclosure; I sell and repair bikes for a living: http://blackstonebicycles.blogspot.com/

  49. #49
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    Bassboat paint

    I see a lot of talk about the two tone bassboat frames only being yeti. That's true for 98 and 99. However, in 1997, the ALL bassboat blue frame was a yeti. It was the most costly frame produced due to the paint. If you take a look at all bass boat paint jobs, you can see that the 97 blue paint is a lot thicker, and "globby" than the others. It is the first year for bassboat (It was the factory team frame) then the 98 two tone bassboats are factory and are possibly made by yeti and have lighter paint than 97 but have decals. The 99's have underlayment for decals and have no decals on top of the paint.

    What I want to know is about the placement of the cable guide bosses and why some frames are off to the side. I have two factory bassboat blue 97's. They are exacly alike except for the guides.

    I love all ten of my homegrowns.

  50. #50
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    I was hoping to learn a little on the 2001 HG Limited anodized frames. I'm guessing from ameybrook's authoritative reference, that my two 19" gold anodized Limiteds may have been made by Anodize, Inc. - or not. They look beautiful with the 'pale' gold ano. I've seen a few that are "dark" yellow and one with a very slight greenish tone - all gold anodized. Perhaps this indicates differing ano houses or simply lack of process control?
    I also own a Orange '99 with the old style disc mounts. Pacific sent it to me as a warranty replacement in 2004 for a gold one I had broken(clean through) 1/4" from where the top tube meets the seat tube.
    Can anyone shed a little light on the gold ano frames for me? Both gold ano frames serial numbers start with "01".

  51. #51
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    Nice bikes. Made in Taiwan


    Why would you own 100 Yugos when you could own 1 Porsche? - Rumpfy



  52. #52
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    Info

    Quote Originally Posted by ameybrook
    Nice bikes. Made in Taiwan
    Thanks.
    I'm in the process of building up the broken frame. A former welder from Fat Chance just put in a collar and welded her. Reba Team, Titec carbon, original XTR kit.
    My recently acquired one carried me to an expert podium at the Nats this year... With the original 01 setup. Retro works.

    My Fuel SL gets dismissive when I take out the Limiteds. The gold diggers just giggle when I'm riding them.

    I'll keep an eye out for an Ultimate.

  53. #53
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    I've been riding this one as a commuter after I installed this rigid fork .I kept the original Judy XC fork. Great hard tail frame. Don't know the pedigree nor do I care. I'm not crazy about the checked flag decals but since they are under clear coat I left them. BTW came with mostly XTR with some Xt.

    I recently built up a Soma DC as my commuter/all rounder and am thinking of selling the homegrown with both forks. Anyone have any idea of value?




    Last edited by bobswire; 01-26-2009 at 11:12 AM.

  54. #54
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    dude. you need to get this on the bay. I ain't saying you just hit the lotto, but everyday you are not on auction is a day you are loosing money.

  55. #55
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    I found one today. Apparently not a yeti frame but it came with old stx cranks, Rock Shox q-21 Sachs grip shifters and Sram esp 9.0 derailler with a Salsa qr binder and xt v-brakes.



    Last edited by sandmangts; 01-27-2009 at 01:59 PM.
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
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    Very cool Sandman, looks like mine.Same decals w/ checkered flags. Do you know the year?
    Mine still has the original seat however a little faded...

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandmangts
    I found one today...
    Let's talk about that Mountain Klein instead.

  58. #58
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    Bobs looks like a 98 Homegrown XT and the Sandman one looks like the same model for 2000.


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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by ameybrook
    Bobs looks like a 98 Homegrown XT and the Sandman one looks like the same model for 2000.
    I am not sure what year it is but the guy I got it from said it was a 99. It was a lower end model because it had STX cranks and a crappy headset. I just landed a Mongoose Iboc Team with Full xt parts and Cook Bro's cranks. I will be transferring the parts over to the homegrown for the wife. Should be an interesting semi-retro build.
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
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  60. #60
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    My 99 didn't have a disc tab, but my 2000 did.


    Why would you own 100 Yugos when you could own 1 Porsche? - Rumpfy



  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairstream
    Let's talk about that Mountain Klein instead.
    It is a work in progress. I just bought another 86 that was beat to hell but the chrome fork is in great shape and original. I will be removing the Manitou and transferring the original fork over. I will post a thread about it when I get a chance.
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
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  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandmangts
    It is a work in progress. I just bought another 86 that was beat to hell but the chrome fork is in great shape and original. I will be removing the Manitou and transferring the original fork over. I will post a thread about it when I get a chance.
    That would be cool. Thanks.

    I had one in my hands and the seller came up with a story and backed out.

    I'm headed down the K'ham route myself.

  63. #63
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    Here is my 98 homegrown factory frame

    This is built by yeti!! chainstays look like the rest of your pics out there
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  64. #64
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    dude. alla dem homegrowns was made by yeti.

  65. #65
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    dude. everyone knows...


    nevermind.

  66. #66
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    double post. flummoxed.

  67. #67
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    triple post. fail.


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  68. #68
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    epic.

  69. #69
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    Dontcha love it. When the kitchen gets remodeled the garage reaps the benefits.

    Nice bike BTW

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidNeiles
    This is built by yeti!! chainstays look like the rest of your pics out there
    Uh oh. Here we go again.

    This is NOT a frame made by Yeti. American made, yes. Yeti made, no. That issue has been discussed ad nauseum ad nauseum. A little search, here, will reveal those truths.
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  71. #71
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    Anyone know any thing about the carbon sweetspot or second century labeled HT frames?

    i have a polished hardtail which my friend swapped out a majority of the parts and scraped some of the labels, it still was labeled with a foil sticker stating the tubing was custom made for schwinn by easton,and i belive it was a 96 model due to the 100 aniversery label and my friend thinks it is a factoy model but is unsure as he got it while working for a dealer quite a few years ago, does anyone know any origin for this frames manufacture and also were the polished frames uncommon?, as i haven't seen many others looking online. Also i have a "98 full suspention carbon homegrown, it is the Black checkered and red metalic monocoque frame with the aluminum swing arm, does anyone know where the two main frame parts were manufactured, and what series of aluminum tubing was used for the rear triangle. i want to have rear disc tabs welded on it and i assume knowing the type of aluminum used will matter. also if anyone has welded tabs on a homegrown and has any advice it would be appreciated.

  72. #72
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    here are some pics of my '98 carbon sweetspot frame, that i am asking the questions above about. all so does anyone know if there is a differance in the gold frame and my red one other than color( aside from the parts that each came with, I am mainly interested only in the differances with the frames).
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    Homegrown Factory

    Hi all. Sorry to beat a dead horse, but I ran across this while reminiscing about my homegrown and couldn't pass up adding my $.02. I have a rare homegrown factory with all black paint.

    I bought my 96 homegrown factory XT new from a shop in Woodstock Illinois in June of that year. I still have the original sales receipt showing I paid (gulp) $2070.00 + tax.

    I originally ordered a regular homegrown early that year and after some kind of snafu about another shop getting mine by mistake, the shop called and said I was getting a homegrown factory for the same price. I was ecstatic. Another month went by, the shop called again and said the bike was in, painted all black, but it didn't get the red spike overlay paint on the front part of the frame (per factory team colors that year) or clearcoat. The story I got from the shop as I recall was that it was some kind of mixup at the Yeti factory, that basically they couldn't keep up with demand, dog ate my homework, etc, etc. They gave me the option to take it as is with another $100 off or wait another month or so for repainting. I took it and I was told that only a handful of others were shipped that way.

    I ran into another guy one year at Jim Thorpe with an all black homegrown factory. He had the same story. I still have the bike, though I think only the frame, stem, hubs and bottom bracket are original. It looks like hell, the paint and decals are a mess without clearcoat. It also has a few dents on the down tube and other war wounds. But I wouldn't part with it.

    Today's full suspension bikes ride better in technical singletrack, but nothing climbs like my old homegrown. It fit me like a glove. It was also the first and last bike that made me feel as comfortable on steep downhills, I think partly due to its lower center of gravity and sloping geometry. I remember other riders going over the bars following me on some of those downhills, back when I was a better rider. Oh man, I just realized I'm riding a 13 year old bike!

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fletch_Lives
    Hi all. Sorry to beat a dead horse, but I ran across this while reminiscing about my homegrown and couldn't pass up adding my $.02. I have a rare homegrown factory with all black paint.

    I bought my 96 homegrown factory XT new from a shop in Woodstock Illinois in June of that year. I still have the original sales receipt showing I paid (gulp) $2070.00 + tax.

    I originally ordered a regular homegrown early that year and after some kind of snafu about another shop getting mine by mistake, the shop called and said I was getting a homegrown factory for the same price. I was ecstatic. Another month went by, the shop called again and said the bike was in, painted all black, but it didn't get the red spike overlay paint on the front part of the frame (per factory team colors that year) or clearcoat. The story I got from the shop as I recall was that it was some kind of mixup at the Yeti factory, that basically they couldn't keep up with demand, dog ate my homework, etc, etc. They gave me the option to take it as is with another $100 off or wait another month or so for repainting. I took it and I was told that only a handful of others were shipped that way.

    I ran into another guy one year at Jim Thorpe with an all black homegrown factory. He had the same story. I still have the bike, though I think only the frame, stem, hubs and bottom bracket are original. It looks like hell, the paint and decals are a mess without clearcoat. It also has a few dents on the down tube and other war wounds. But I wouldn't part with it.

    Today's full suspension bikes ride better in technical singletrack, but nothing climbs like my old homegrown. It fit me like a glove. It was also the first and last bike that made me feel as comfortable on steep downhills, I think partly due to its lower center of gravity and sloping geometry. I remember other riders going over the bars following me on some of those downhills, back when I was a better rider. Oh man, I just realized I'm riding a 13 year old bike!
    Cool story Fletch and I get a kick every time this thread get's a bump. My take on the whole debate is that Schwinn was probably getting a little bit sneaky by claiming some bikes were built (which could have meant assembled) by Yeti. I know selling Schwinns in the late 90's our reps always told us that the factory models were coming from Yeti and everything else was the Pacific Northwest. Go figure what reps actually knew though.

    I like to pretend that my 98 Factory XT with the two tone silver and blue bass boat is made by Yeti even if it wasn't

    old pic:

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by berrywise
    I like to pretend that my 98 Factory XT with the two tone silver and blue bass boat is made by Yeti even if it wasn't [/IMG]
    And good thing for you, it was.

    I own the same '98 blue/silver Factory, as well as '99 gold/black Factory.
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    Hi:
    I have a 98 (i think its 98) homegrown factory XTR that I got new in 2000. I came across this thread when trying to search on how to do maintenance on the front fork (SID SL).
    The bike has been sitting for a few years. I just dusted it off a bit and rode yesterday (it was 90 degrees here in NJ! !!)
    I love this bike. I cant believe 3 yrs ago I wanted to unload it for practically nothing. I'm so glad no one found interest in it and I kept it.

    Does anyone know if I can still find the green Michelin tires? and what can I do for the front fork? Its kind of beat (its soft as heck).

    Also: this bike has only been off road once and very lightly. I was more of a roadie and just got a MTB to get one... It sat in my basement for 98% of its life and I just never got into mountain biking (no flames please!!) So the front fork shouldnt be completely kicked. I think it may just need air? The SID that is on this doesnt allow adjustment via a know on the fork tubes. I dont know if there is a way to adjust it but I cant find anything online about it - I mean I guess since its over 10yrs old there wouldnt be .!!

    I'll post some pics of it when I get home and wash it. Its just dusty but the bike is ** mint ** !!!

    thanks all for a great read about these schwinns. I knew there was a reason I bought it long ago.

  77. #77
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    Sweet. Was yours built by Yeti?

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairstream
    Sweet. Was yours built by Yeti?

    hahahaha!!!

  79. #79
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    okay so I'm kind of afraid to bump this thread again, but I just impulse bought a '99 (I think) Homegrown Elite - the LX build, 6061 frameset. This thread has been a real help for some stuff. I have 2 questions:

    1) is the Judy SL even worth bothering with or should I just replace it?

    2) is there any hope of jerry rigging it for disc brakes or should I not bother? It has those weird disc post tabs mounted horizontally on the chainstay. I assume this is an old/obsolete spec and I prolly can't get adapters for it?

    Got it all setup this week. Once I removed the 8 pound piece of crap suspension post that some joker had put on there, I think I have definitely found my go-to bike for short track and non-technical XC racing. Hot diggety is this thing FAST, and it fits me like a glove. My BF tried to drop me going uphill yesterday and wasn't able to do it - he had to resort to punking me at a gate! So awesome.

    Let me know if you have any thoughts, especially on the fork issue. I can live without disc brakes for sure, tho finding a modern fork with v-mounts may prove tricky.

  80. #80
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    Call Yeti. maybe they can help?






















    Who in their right mind would pass that up?
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  81. #81
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    sid?

  82. #82
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    IMHO don't go disks. You'll need a new fork and maybe a new hub. I'm pretty sure a new hub but I don't know much about new technology. Besides, cantis (or maybe V's for that year) will just look more..."correct".

    EDIT: Perhaps i've been corrected below.

    Also, Berry, I keep hearing rumors of these Homegrown's you own but have yet to see one!
    Last edited by Slimpee; 05-07-2009 at 06:38 AM.
    Keep the Rubber Side Down!

    Wanted: Judy FSX decals

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by lonefrontranger

    2) is there any hope of jerry rigging it for disc brakes or should I not bother? It has those weird disc post tabs mounted horizontally on the chainstay.
    Hayes 22mm mount caliper - hard but by no means impossible to find - try eBay but be prepared to spend $50+

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    Quote Originally Posted by mechagouki
    Hayes 22mm mount caliper - hard but by no means impossible to find - try eBay but be prepared to spend $50+
    Whomp. There it is.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Rare-Hay...3A1%7C294%3A50

    IMO, you gots yourself a nice frame. Any modern fork thats 80-100mm will work fine.


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  85. #85
    Don't Stop Spinnin'!
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    homegrowns are the Funk!
    ~every end is a new beginning...

  86. #86
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    Funks are the homegrown.

  87. #87
    little mad riding hood
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    Quote Originally Posted by ameybrook
    Whomp. There it is....

    IMO, you gots yourself a nice frame. Any modern fork thats 80-100mm will work fine.
    Thanks ameybrook!! This is all good info. I'll put that on my watch list, tho I think I'll stick to v's for now as I paid a ridiculously low sum for this thing (it was an impulse buy, afterall)... I had Vs on all my hardtails up to this point and a) I don't weigh much (I am a girl afterall) and b) it's cheap not to have to swap out a bunch of stuff to make way for hydros. I mean if I have to suck it up and put a 140mm disc on the front cos I can't find a decent fork with V posts, well then so be it.

    Cantis?! Seriously?? Christ, it's old but not THAT old... Nor do I have a death wish - you ever raced XC on cantis? Well then if so, you're braver than I thought =P I mean, I've been racing hardtails (and my old, rigid Bridgestone, was that ever a beast!) since the early early 90s, and I recall that Vs became standard / OEM spec on most racing level hardtails starting from about '94 or '95 onward. Honestly my ex was able to put Hayes hydros on his old Trek 9500 XC hardtail back in like '98 or '99 or whenever.

    geez. this thread is making me feel old, if mainly because I don't really think of the Homegrown as a "vintage" bike. I helped man the Kenda booth at Interbike back in '99 when the Homegrown (and Schwinn's whole marketing hype deal) was THE thing everyone was talking about...

    // goddamn kids, get offa my lawn!

  88. #88
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    Lone front ranger. Not sure if you are hung on Disc. But consider continuing with rim. Lightness is your friend when racing XC.
    I've been racing 2 x 2001 gold HG limiteds and a 99 (orange) Pro frame with XTR and carbon Titec stuff. My large weighs in at around 20# with pedals and depending on tires.
    They are super light frames. Suggest you change out the fork as Ameybrook suggests(i've run Sidi WC, Race and REBAs) and find some superlight wheels to be used ONLY for racing. Mine are Bontrager Race Lite XXX SE wheels at 1370g. $ spent on rotational weight is the money well spent. I assume the frame has the epicenter seatstays for sound lateral stability. I've hucked and jumped from 3' over and over and ride some super techy stuff regularly - The frames are astonishingly rugged ( caveat: I weigh 160#). Not trying to toot my own horn (cringe)but the Homegrowns have helped me win the local series 4x and podium at Nationals in Cat 1 last year. They do the trick - so enjoy your newfound rocket.

  89. #89
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    LFR - For what its worth, I raced on cantis for maaaaany years. Never did I feel that I needed additional braking power until I tried Vs. Same for the next five years, until I tried discs, etc.

    A well set up pair of cantis (something along the lines of an XTR M900), a good set of levers, and a pair of true wheels will stop a bike just fine.

    In terms of stopping power in dry conditions, in my opinion, a well set up pair of Vs are as good as any disc. In the wet, no doubt a disc is better. If you're a front-ranger, Vs and a true wheel should be fine.


    Why would you own 100 Yugos when you could own 1 Porsche? - Rumpfy



  90. #90
    little mad riding hood
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    Quote Originally Posted by ameybrook
    LFR - For what its worth, I raced on cantis for maaaaany years. Never did I feel that I needed additional braking power until I tried Vs. Same for the next five years, until I tried discs, etc.

    A well set up pair of cantis (something along the lines of an XTR M900), a good set of levers, and a pair of true wheels will stop a bike just fine.

    In terms of stopping power in dry conditions, in my opinion, a well set up pair of Vs are as good as any disc. In the wet, no doubt a disc is better. If you're a front-ranger, Vs and a true wheel should be fine.
    oh yea, I raced (MTBs) on cantis for years as well. Still do on my 'cross bike, for that matter. However I absolutely cringe everytime I have to futz with the damn things. They suck to adjust, and getting them setup just right is endlessly fiddly. Getting them setup wrong is the norm, including if you're lazy like me and don't tend to keep on top of adjustments due to pad wear. Meaning that, at some point you will go OH CRAP and late-brake into some collapsing radius offcamber-to-gnarly-rock-garden line thru kitty litter (which is honestly the norm out here), you're done for. The moment Vs became available at a reasonable price for my broke-student butt back then (I'm thinking '95) I slapped 'em on my hardtail and never looked back.

    Raineman: I'm definitely not hung up on discs, and I agree with ameybrook that it's not all that big an issue due to conditions out here in Colorado anyhow.

    The thing is, looking at the current crop of Rebas, SID, et. al... available on fleabay I may not have a choice but to run a front disc. They just flat out do not make high end forks available in post mount anymore, and good quality used XC forks in better-than-knackered condition appear to be rarer than hen's teeth. Which sucks as doing a hydro front also means dealing with a hybrid wheel build, etcetera, but whatever *shrug*

  91. #91
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    Sorry to continue beating this dead horse but I just came across this thread. If anyone is interested in a "Homegrown Factory" frame I have one on eBay now. This is a true Homegrown Factory, that was built in the Yeti factory in Durango in 1997. I was working a the local Schwinn dealer at the time.

    The frame does "appear" to have a hairline crack in it (pictured).

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=tab%3DSelling

  92. #92
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    I've got 22mm chain stay mount pattern disc brake adapters if any one is interested. My pics are too big for this format but you may contact me regarding them at: nanoseth@yahoo.com.

  93. #93
    Glorified Hybrid Owner
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    Quote Originally Posted by pooneej
    Does anyone know if I can still find the green Michelin tires?
    How about NOS Kenda Klaws in the same color?

    Check your PMs.

  94. #94
    I like turtles
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    Anyone know where you can get a Schwinn Homegrown sticker set? I have a '97 Homegrown - not the factory one.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  95. #95
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    Craigslist-Homegrown

    I just bought this frame on Craigslist a few days ago and built it up with my parts and I must say she sure is perty! Any ideas on the year? Any info would be great? It has the weird disc brake adapter on the rear. The sticker on the seattube says....

    Proprietary Alloy
    Boulder Colorado USA
    A bunch of question marks like this ??????????
    Limited Edition Frame

    I took the sticker off the toptube and downtube because they were torn to ****, but I still have the chainstay protector that I peeled off that says Schwinn Homegrown on it. I left the headtube badge on and the sticker on the seattube also.

    Any info on this would be great. Someone said it was a Schwinn Homegrown Factory and not a Yeti. But if Yeti did not make it, who did. thanks yall


  96. #96
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    Its a 2000.


    Why would you own 100 Yugos when you could own 1 Porsche? - Rumpfy



  97. #97
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    Thanks, I just found the catalog on here and see that it is a 2000 Factory. Who actually made those? Any idea? thanks

  98. #98
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    Made overseas for certain


    Why would you own 100 Yugos when you could own 1 Porsche? - Rumpfy



  99. #99
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    "Made overseas for certain"?
    That doesnt go along with the Boulder, Colorado sticker on it. hmmmmm

  100. #100
    25-yr old Retrogrouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurricanebama
    "Made overseas for certain"?
    That doesnt go along with the Boulder, Colorado sticker on it. hmmmmm
    I could put a sticker saying "Lincoln, Nebraska" but that doesn't mean my bike was made in Lincoln...
    Keep the Rubber Side Down!

    Wanted: Judy FSX decals

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