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  1. #1
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    No matter what else I buy, 1986 Rockhopper....

    remains my favorite I got it when I was 11 and it was too big. Now 37, I'm stretching it to make it fit with some 5" riser bars and a longer seatpost.
    I now have a couple of 29ers which are better suited for the rough trails but nothing rides like the Rockhopper around town. The frame is buttery smooth and just feels so solid.
    These oldschool mtb's are such gems that I don't see the advantage to these fancy new commuters and townies. Just throw on some slicks and racks and it doesn't get much better.
    I don't know the point here. Guess I'm still buzzing from riding this thing tonight and wanted to share.

  2. #2
    artistic...
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    Pictures!
    want: Ibis ti handlebar. suntour 31.8 front derr. bottom pull

  3. #3
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    I can say the same about my Dad's '83 Stumpjumper. I rode it a lot while in college and and I haven't found a rigid bike that rides quite like it. I have a Surly Ogre that rides good but it's just not the same.

  4. #4
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    Its now a 1x5 with a 44t up front. Testing to see if pics attatch.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails No matter what else I buy, 1986 Rockhopper....-rockhopper-006.jpg  


  5. #5
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    OMG it worked! (first time posting pics) Here's more Don't touch the tires they're still hot from tonight's ride
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails No matter what else I buy, 1986 Rockhopper....-rockhopper-002.jpg  

    No matter what else I buy, 1986 Rockhopper....-rockhopper-004.jpg  

    No matter what else I buy, 1986 Rockhopper....-rockhopper-005.jpg  


  6. #6
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    Love that yellow!

  7. #7
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    Thanks Seiorserioso, I bent the original fork but I think I like it better with the black one.

  8. #8
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    great old rh. love that you've kept the canti's on it, I couldn't agree more about how old mtb's make great commuters, I ride one to campus every day
    All vintage all the time. Nothing like a nice chromo frame with some properly adjusted cantilevers.

  9. #9
    CS2
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    I'll second that. My 86 Rockhopper.

    1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1992 Stumpjumpers. 1995 Waterford 1200, 1999 Waterford RSE, plus a garage full of steel frames.

  10. #10
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    Does anyone know if the Rockhopper and Hardrock are the same frame? We're talking about an early 90's era. I just picked up a Hardrock that is purple with yellow decals. Sorry, no pics yet. I want to make a townie out of it, so I'm hoping the ride will be as good as a Rockhopper for that purpose.

    Thanks!

  11. #11
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    Nice one CS2! Looks all original.

  12. #12
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    She's a keeper!

  13. #13
    CS2
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    Quote Originally Posted by WVJon75 View Post
    Nice one CS2! Looks all original.
    Right down to the reflectors and plastic dork disc, which are coming off. The original owner said it was hanging in his garage for over 15 years. It looked like it.
    1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1992 Stumpjumpers. 1995 Waterford 1200, 1999 Waterford RSE, plus a garage full of steel frames.

  14. #14
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    Back in 87, when I was visiting as a boy with a San Francisco family, I was borrowed one of these. That was when I got really infected with mountain-biking. Sadly, the yellow thing didn't stand my brute force Something different broke every new day

  15. #15
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    I ride my 1986 Rockhopper all the time (daily at times). I "modernized" it a bit with a 1X9 set-up (modern drivetrain), a 30" wide handlebar and upgraded brakes. Although, the plastic rocks Tektro passes off as brake pads need to go. I bought this as a frame and fork for $30 - so nothing on it is original.

    I've broken quite a few personal records with this bike, and I'm really surprised when I break personal downhill records with it.

    These old, steel frames ride like a dream - but that is completely dependent on the trail. Depending on where I'm riding or what trail I'm going to hit, I will decide whether the old-school is a viable option. Otherwise, I'm riding something more modern with WAY better brakes, front suspension, better geometry, etc.

    These bikes are good for fire road'y rides and smoother trails. When it gets gnarly, they suck. As much as I love my old bike, I have to be realistic about things.




  16. #16
    CS2
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    Very nice. What did you do to go 9 speed?
    1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1992 Stumpjumpers. 1995 Waterford 1200, 1999 Waterford RSE, plus a garage full of steel frames.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    Very nice. What did you do to go 9 speed?
    Easy! I just want to clarify - NOTHING on this bike is original since I built it from the frame set. Like I said, a guy was selling it for $30, and I couldn't pass it up

    I simply have a standard 9sp. cassette on there, a Truvativ Stylo crankset with just the 32T middle ring (you have to buy SS chainring bolts) and a Paul Components chain keeper (I had one laying around) - that's just to help the front of the chain dropping. There are a number of ways to retain the chain from dropping - you can go as simple as using a bash guard and jump-stop thing. Or, some guys go real low budget and just use their front derailleur (minus the shifter). You're just trying to keep the chain from dropping.

    Do your standard chain length math, and depending on your rear derailleur, subtract the appropriate links. I took out 4 links (I think). You want enough chain so the rear derailleur doesn't bind when in the large cog.

    That's it! Yank the granny and the big chainring, shorten your chain appropriately, and find a way to retain the front chain from dropping - easy peasy.

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