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  1. #1
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    My first real..... you guessed it.

    Ritchey!

    It's becoming a bit of a cliche aroung here lately, but I certainly don't care. My long and patient wait for this package is finally over... and now I'm too busy to even have time to unpack it. On the other hand, I DO have time to show off and post a couple of teaser photos.

    A very nice gentleman sold me his '87 Timber Comp. Being one of my dream bikes, this will effectively end a couple of my other wannabe, "proxy" projects, and I think this one deserves a proper restoration . When I have time, I'm going to need to solict some advice from some of you guys on this one - It has a small bit of chainstay damage. But for essentially $150, I didn't think I could go wrong.

    Long live the UPS! More to follow soon...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails My first real..... you guessed it.-hs.jpg  

    My first real..... you guessed it.-bb.jpg  

    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

  2. #2
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Woo hoo! Congrats. You should check out the restoration thread as my Potts had some chainstay damage that Square Root of 2 managed to save the paint from and it looks fantastic.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    Woo hoo! Congrats. You should check out the restoration thread as my Potts had some chainstay damage that Square Root of 2 managed to save the paint from and it looks fantastic.
    Thanks. I'll check out the thread. All the paint is pretty bad though. And.... my celebration may be short lived anyway. I think this is an '88, not an '87, now that I see it.... Which reminded me of this tread from Yo Natey:

    1988 Ritchey Timber Comp SN 1B412

    Could this be the same bike? Calling Nate: Do you still have yours?! If not, the damage might be worse than I thought.

    EDIT: Duh' of course its the same bike. Serial number is in the thread title. CURSE YOU YO-NATEY! You scooped my pheonix, and I got your ritchey dreggs!

    So is it restorable??? Anybody???!!!
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

  4. #4
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    Ah, the circle of life. I sold that bike about two years ago when I cleaned house before moving back to California. Did you get the bar and stem too?

    I actually really liked the 'bad' paint. Why not take it to a framebuilder and see if it can be aligned? For $150, there are worse projects.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  5. #5
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Yeah, that was cheap, Keith. Where are you located? There's some great guys that could maybe fix the alignment. MuddyBuddy had a great guy in San Diego that helped him with something not that long ago.

  6. #6
    velocipede technician
    Reputation: hollister's Avatar
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    That really isn't that hard to fix
    looking for 20-21" P team

  7. #7
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Hollister will fix it!

  8. #8
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    Yeah, the "circle" is pretty funny. On one hand, it goes to show that the group of people interested in such things is probably smaller than we all think. On the other hand, it indicates that there might actually be less of those coveted bikes around, too - so they still seem more "special." (Instead of two '88, 21" timber comps with their own threads represented here, there's really only just the one bike.)

    For the price I paid, I can't complain. I'll give it a good shot.

    The fillet brazed stem, unfortunately, was not included. On the other hand, I've got almost enough correct parts saved up that I can build it without spending a lot.... other than potential frame repairs....

    Unfortunately, it seems to have lived a hard life since you owned it, Nate, and it's not really the "old-ness" of the paint that makes me think a re-paint might be inevitable. The non-drive chain stay (the only damage I was aware of when I bought it) is squished and banged up pretty bad. I'll take a snapshot as soon as I can.

    So THIS is the part I might want help and recommendations with. I live in rural Wyoming, with no easy access to framebuilders or anyone qualified for repairs, so I'd have to send it somewhere. If it was any other bike, , joined by anything other than fillet brazing, by any other builder, and didn't have U-brake bosses right next to the dent, it would be a little easier. Crossing my fingers that I can fix everything with brass filler and an alignment table.

    Will look forward to ideas/input when I get a photo up. Thanks for the encouragement and interest......
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

  9. #9
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    How far are you from Bozeman and Carl Strong?
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by yo-Nate-y View Post
    How far are you from Bozeman and Carl Strong?
    I'm about a 4 hour drive from Bozeman. I used to got there once every couple of months or so, but not lately. For the cost of gas though, I'd probably just end up shipping this anyway - so proximity might not really matter. I'd forgotten about Strong, so thanks for the reminder. I'm not super familiar with his work, but he's been on my radar from time to time. If he was good enough for Ibis, he's definitely good enough for me!

    It seems like the hard part of this would be calling up an active builder and saying "Hey. I'm not in the market for one of YOUR bikes, but I've got this 25 year old beater that I'm willing to pour stupid money into. Interested in helping?" Am I wrong, or would the fact that its a Ritchey make it a little bit more acceptable? I guess I'm hoping that there's someone out there who's either passionate enough about the bike (Like Rody/Groovy with Fat Chance), or who focuses on repair work.

    In the end, it looks like it might be a moot point though - I'll post some pics up in a moment that will explain why.
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

  11. #11
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    pics

    I finally had time to look at this thing and take some pictures. I'm thankful for any ideas or insight. Needless to say, these snapshots are way more revealing than the ones I was shown by the seller before I bought it.

    Here's the whole frame. As Nate said, there's a pretty neat quaility (beausage/patina) to the old paint. Damage appears to be isolated entirely to the non-drive side of the rear triangle, but its pretty severe. There are three distinct issues.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-overall.jpg

    First issue, which Nate had shown previously, is the curved non-drive seat stay. The other side is shown for reference. One curiosity or clue: The dropouts are spaced at 135mm. Wouldn't this have been 130mm when new? It's almost like someone tried to add 5mm to one side only. A wheel does not fit anywhere near center, right now.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-l-seat-stay.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-r-seat-stay.jpg

    Second issue, which i wasn't told about but was also clearly present even when Nate owned it, is the dent in the bottom of the seat stay. It's hard to show in photographs, but the stay appears to change directions below the bend, and to angle slightly forward toward until it reaches the dropout.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-ss-dent-1.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-ss-dent-2.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-ss-dent-3.jpg

    Finally but worst of all is this crimped chanistay. This was the only damage I was made aware of, but it's way worse than I was led to believe. Looks like someone intentionally took pliers to it in an attempt to re-center the wheel, which was offset as a result of the previous issues.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-cs-dent-1.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-cs-dent-2.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-cs-dent-3.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-cs-dent-4.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-cs-dent-5.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-cs-dent-6.jpg

    Hard to show in a photo, but this is either hopeful or discouraging: This particular chainstay is actually slightly ovalized, from the dent, past the bridge, all the way to the bottom bracket. There's no visible sign of stress in the paint or fillets, so it almost looks intentional. (Either that, or this is a huge testament to the resilience of brass and old-school wet paint.) The non-damaged, drive-side stay is perfectly round though and it seems like, if it was intentional, it would be the other way around.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-ovalized.jpg

    So what do you think? Is it worth fixing? Can anything be done without having to install a new stay? Or do I have the makings of a really expensive but cool wind chime?
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

  12. #12
    Trying to grow a mustache
    Reputation: Z-Man's Avatar
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    I would see about getting everything aligned, then chalk the battle scars up to patina. If anything starts to crack, then look at frame repair...
    Vintage-Retro-Pragmatist

  13. #13
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    If you really want to restore it, why don't you send it to Ritchey and have him fix it?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by FairfaxPat View Post
    If you really want to restore it, why don't you send it to Ritchey and have him fix it?

    Has TR been known to do such work? I've never heard of him repairing one of his early bikes (or any of his bikes for that matter). I'm afraid to ask what that would cost.
    -eric-

    http://www.rumpfy.com

    Wanted: Syncros 27.2 x 425 seatpost

  15. #15
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    +1 on the Windchime. You could always cut the front triangle off and make a nice shop seat out of it.
    Or you could ride it the way it is and go rear brake-less.

  16. #16
    the new Gilbert Grape
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    I'd image the frame could be completely repaired. However, the cost of doing so is likely greater than what it would cost you to buy one of these frames in nice condition. If you can get it aligned and rideable for cheap, I'd go that route - it might not look great, but that's okay.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  17. #17
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    I agree with Laffeaux. Ride it into the ground. Hopefully you can get it aligned for cheap-ish. Lots of well worn Ritcheys out there, enjoy it.

  18. #18
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    Yeah, my gut is telling me that you guys are probably correct: Not worth what it would cost to fix properly. Adding together the original $150 +shipping, shipping two more times, a couple hundred minimum for repairs, and probably $350 for paint and decals if I went that route, it could add up pretty quick. And at what point does it become something less than it originally was - even if my goal isn't to make money on it or sell it ever. Sadly, unless I happen to find someone who can do it locally, I think a simple alignment would be even less worth the effort. I've got pleanty of other options for "beater bikes," that wouldn't be so heartbreaking to have to look at.

    I do wish these were easier to find in my perfect size, like this, though. And I really do dream of owning this specific bike. Like many of the bikes I acquire these days, it's the one I always wished I could have afforded when I was a poor college student, but had to settle for buying (and enjoying) the '88 stumpjumper rip-off/clone instead.
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

  19. #19
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    Wait! I can pickle that!

    Attachment 818774

    Well, I wasn't quite ready to let this dream die, or to put this old girl out to pasture. I mentioned earlier in the thread that I live in rural Wyoming, but that doesn't mean I don't have a repressed urban hipster dude lurking deep within my psyche somewhere. I know this isn't everybody's cup of tea, but the irony is that I've been using it more frequently than any of my other bikes, and probably way more than I would have done with a simple restoration as I'd planned. Here's what I came up with - a longtail cargo bike!:

    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-rr.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-r.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-f.jpg

    It's amazing what a "nothing to loose" attitude can do for you. Through some judicious use of vises and clamps, and by strategically placing the frame on blocks and then bouncing my full weight on it, I was able to remove most of the dent, and to align the rear end pretty darn well.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-vise.jpg

    Some creative taping all but concealed the worst of the damage! The best thing about this solution is that The long-tail attaches in such a way that the much of the rear loads are transferred to the chainstay bridge, just behind the bottom bracket - bypassing the damaged area almost completely.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-tounge-top.jpg

    Seatstays are much more symetrical now, too! I'ts now obvious that some of the problems were caused when someone tried to re-space the rear end to 135mm. Not something I would have ever done, but it bolts right in to the longtail. I had to use V-brakes and a travel agent, but they work pretty well. (It's a shame that Xtracycle forgot to include roller cam bosses. On the other hand, without canti bosses, this frame actually looks cleaner than most for this application.)

    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-seatstays.jpg

    The rest was compiled from parts borrowed from an old Fischer frame, of the same vintage, that my sister left hanging in my garage a little too long...

    My first real..... you guessed it.-hookoodonor.jpg

    (that'll teach her.)

    My first real..... you guessed it.-hookoohulk.jpg

    ... along with some modern handlebars, FAT tires, an NOS XT bottom bracket, some front brakes from my parts bins that would work on posts without tension holes, and a 135mm rear axle swap.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-cockpit.jpg
    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-drivetrain.jpg

    I got this optional seat cushion and a stoker handlebar, and my kids absolutely love riding on it. We've been using it all summer to go to outdoor concerts and parades, riding around campgrounds and the lake, going the grocery store, farmer's markets, and the county fair.

    My first real..... you guessed it.-timbercycle-cusion.jpg

    Now I just need to find some snide, holier-than-thou bumper sticker that says "my other pickup truck is a bike."
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

  20. #20
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    Awesome!!! I am really glad to see that it came together so nicely and usefully. Well done!

    I hadn't seen the postings below my last comment, but I can confirm that the plier crimp-looking business was *not* there when I sold it. The dents and gouges were there, and were very well documented in the eBay ad when I let it go though... Sorry that info dropped out along the way to you, but I am really stoked to see how it turned out!
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  21. #21
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Wow, that looks great as a long haul trucker and even better news is that you're riding it a lot. What a utilitarian bike it turned out to be and it looks great. A long convoluted way of getting there but I love it.

    Congrats and well done.

    and hilarious comment about your sister.

  22. #22
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    Thanks, all. I'm not ruling out the idea of fixing it properly some day (if I ever quit using it as is), but that's the beauty of a bolt-on solution. And Nate - you know I was joking when I cursed your name earlier, right?!
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

  23. #23
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    Great repurposing of the damaged frame. Definitely a smile maker.

  24. #24
    VRC Hound
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    Bike came together well! And you can never go wrong cursing Nate's name.

  25. #25
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    Amazing work, Hoss. Genius: It hits me in the face like sock full of quarters, sometimes--like right now. Damn nice bike.

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