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  1. #1
    It's about showing up.
    Reputation: Berkeley Mike's Avatar
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    Moving on from a classic

    I posted something about this earlier but mods and principals felt it was too much like an ad. Sooo far from my intention...

    It wasn't an ad: it is more a comment about a vintage/classic bike falling off of the edge of utility as a practical and personal issue. I don't collect bikes or hang them on the wall; I ride them. I was looking for discussion from others on this topic.

    Vintage/classic bikes are all well and good; I love mine. Yet as I age it stops working for me; it is beating me up. As bikes progress, develop technically and become more sophisticated, what they make possible for riders changes the way riders approach the sport. Such developments effect safety in a strict technical sense but also in preserving energy, reducing fatigue and increasing comfort which preserves attention and focus in a highly dynamic sport in a highly changeable venue. Any number of such supporting different considerations and developments might serve to keep me riding for any number of reasons.

    This is a totally appropriate discussion for Vintage/Classic Bikes. I, along with a number of other participants, represent a long historical experience with mtb dating back to full rigid/canti/6-speed and have a great affection for that period. I was 30, with tons of energy and a sense of adventure. Sound familiar? Neither the bike nor I were vintage or classics when I started riding it but now so many years later....

    I have watched bikes change remarkably over the last 31 years of riding and leaving a classic bike begs a pretty good discussion of passion, judgment, regret, abandonment, faith with the cause, ennui...I think you see where I am going with this. Sometimes things are posted just to see how others feels, to get support, to tease out understanding by encouraging group input. Sometimes this is about metal parts and sometimes it is about our heads and hearts.

    I am dragging my feet on this issue but I have learned that sometimes with tough decisions if I publicize them it forces me foreword.

    Anyone else have this experience?
    I don't rattle.

  2. #2
    Stokeless Asshat
    Reputation: jeff's Avatar
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    I thought you passed the bike on to someone on the team awhile back. So what have you moved on to?
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  3. #3
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Hmm, if it beats you up, sounds like you've moved on to FS land, no?

    I find 26" wheels uncomfortable in comparison to 29, or the fatties I roll on so frequently nowadays.

    I guess if you don't hang on to stuff, yeah, it just needs to find a new home.

    Me? I hang onto them, and ride them every now and then, on rides that won't exacerbate the pounding problems.

    Letting go of an old friend is hard to do, but it sounds as though you've made the logical decision to move it on. Now it's simply a matter of how, and to whom.

    Might want to try a halfway house first, a buddy who will let you buy it back is a great first step
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  4. #4
    velocipede technician
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    I suggest you start drinking. Heavily, and immediately
    looking for 20-21" P team

  5. #5
    Stokeless Asshat
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    And then hit yourself in the junk with the empty bottle?
    Quote Originally Posted by hollister View Post
    I suggest you start drinking. Heavily, and immediately
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  6. #6
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    I had the same concerns with a Breezer I bought new @1996-7. I ended up letting my brother hold onto it for a while. He needed a neighborhood bike to chase his son and I needed the room. I still see it on family/group rides and it's still referred to as "my bike". Win win situation for us!

  7. #7
    artistic...
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    Quote Originally Posted by hollister View Post
    I suggest you start drinking. Heavily, and immediately
    12 yr old scotch. No head aches.
    want: Ibis ti handlebar. suntour 31.8 front derr. bottom pull

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post

    a vintage/classic bike falling off of the edge of utility as a practical and personal issue. I don't collect bikes or hang them on the wall; I ride them.
    You answer your question for yourself already.
    If you have no desire to collect bikes, and can afford something more modern and to your riding style, why would cluttering the garage with an old bike even be an option.

    Buy an add, sell the bike, get yourself a new seat post with the proceeds. Walla! No regrets.
    Seek: Koski Trailmaster. Breezer Series 2, or 3. Fillet brazed Ibis Custom. Cunningham Racer. Otis Guy (but not that softride model). That's all I need I don't need anything else... except... except for an old Mountain Goat bar stem combo. And that's all I need. I don't need anything else. Except.....

  9. #9
    GMF
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    I'm definitely in the minority here, but my take with these old mountain bikes is to marry the old with the new. Keep the aesthetic of the earlier days of mountain biking with the function of engineering manpower that has yielded amazing performance gains in the last 20-30 years. I'm not sure if that path is appealing to you at all, but it can certainly keep older bikes relevant to today's world. Having said that, i haven't spent a lot of time on super modern bikes and don't know what I'm missing.

    Also, variety is a fun thing. Riding my 'cross bike on stupidly technical trails is a fun thing to do... occasionally. So keeping that option open is not a bad idea, but if you are truly setting that bike off to the side and have no interest in riding it - get rid of it. Pass it on to someone deserving of your memories/experiences with it.

    Best of luck!

  10. #10
    human dehumidifier
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    Mike, it would take me 3 days to type out that long of a post due to OCD-level editing on my part. Do you compose those off-line and then paste them in, or is that stream-of-consciousness writing?

    I thought of selling my Phoenix recently because I don't ride it much and the paint started peeling on it. But that old bike is like an old friend to me and I couldn't let it go. I don't have to sell it, and I've got other bikes so my need for something else is already fulfilled. I enjoy working on them as much as riding them, so I decided to re-purpose it as a fun-anywhere singlespeed.

    I've sold other bikes (and cars) when I didn't really need to, and lived to regret it. I'm glad I didn't do that again this time.
    But if you close your eyes it becomes so easy to see

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    I think this is common to anything old and mechanical... My 67 912 - that I loved - was so terrible at doing what a car actually should (start, go, brake, repeat...) I had to get an appliance to actually drive.

    When it comes to bikes, I'm happy to slow down and grey-out these days. Happier to be in the woods than to be cleaning technical sections and improving my out-and-back times. I walk. I look for birds. I don't ask a lot of my mountain bike and could Fonzie mine without issues. There's comfort for me in that.
    Last edited by mainlyfats; 09-19-2013 at 02:04 PM.

  12. #12
    It's about showing up.
    Reputation: Berkeley Mike's Avatar
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    That's what I'm talking about!
    I don't rattle.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    I thought you passed the bike on to someone on the team awhile back. So what have you moved on to?
    Funny you recall that. Actually, I gad a couple of my young racers use it for racing. I was proud both of what they understood about the bike and how well it held up.
    I don't rattle.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    And then hit yourself in the junk with the empty bottle?
    twice.

  15. #15
    CS2
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    Quote Originally Posted by GMF View Post
    I'm definitely in the minority here, but my take with these old mountain bikes is to marry the old with the new. Keep the aesthetic of the earlier days of mountain biking with the function of engineering manpower that has yielded amazing performance gains in the last 20-30 years.
    You mean like a retro/mod bike?
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  16. #16
    GMF
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    Yeah, pretty much. Eg ceramic bearings is older hubs, grafting Sid internals into a Judy chassis, new tires that work well, 10sp thumbshifters etc. things like that. My project bike is at the edge of that performance plateaux, being from '94, but it is still a very relevant hardtail. If I was working with something from the 80s, it might be a different story.

  17. #17
    It's about showing up.
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    I totally refurbish this frame in 2010. I went with full XTR, carbon bars & cranks, Chris King Headset and hubs, DT Swiss ceramic rims, Ergon grips, new powdercoat. It was setup to race at about 24 lbs. Now, with 2.35/2.1 tires, drop-nose WTB seat it weighs a lot more but technically spot-on for my riding. The fork is a Bomber and needs updating. 1" headtube can be got from White Bros but that is another $800 more I don't want to put into the bike.

    This is serious steel hard tail. People will stop to look at it. I was pointed out in a July 4th Parade and product/bike reps stop to comment on it in the stand. Hence my mixed feelings.
    I don't rattle.

  18. #18
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    So again, the question. Have you moved on to another bike? 29", 27.5", 26"? If so just bring back to it's former glory and ride it on occasion. That's what many of us do here. I've been on the 29" band wagon since 2000 and will not get off. SS, hard tails, squishy ect. The vintage bikes get out rarely and I'm not ashamed.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  19. #19
    It's about showing up.
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    When I think of the best riding I have done on the Bonti it was hard-charging, rocket out of the corners, and bucking broncho over rough terrain type riding. I don't ride like that so much anymore except on certain stretches and that is a great feeling. Or, tough techy climbs are cool too. The relatively dated quality of the Bomber and arthritis in my hands make a poor combination despite soft settings, ergon grips, and carbon bars.

    I never liked the floppiness/sluggishness of 29 which, I am sure, is a reaction to the crisp quickness of the Bonti. I've been looking at 650b, and 29 again, to reunderstand things. Funny, I think I am done with 26.

    I have no investment in hanging onto something to ride once in a while. We have 12 bikes in our household and moving them around to get to them is a pain. So i'll keep the commuter, lose the Roubaix and the Stumpy Pro; nice, but I have never loved it.

    The idea of a 29er got boost last weekend when on a swoopy gradual down of about 1.5 miles. It was a Spot HT, at a HT venue, and the geometry worked for me but re-accelerating was more of a challenge. Also rode a 2014 Carbon Stumpy Expert 29er with carbon wheels. It felt comfortable right away. The test was a bit short but some dirt and turns told me it had possibilities. I have only ridden one 650B, a Liteville AM thing, so totally wrong for me but a beautiful bike. Laid back, like driving an old Buick around switchbacks but a laser on fast downs or wide turns. I'd like to see something like that in a less AM geometry.

    You guys are making me think.
    I don't rattle.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
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    I feel like I could sell you a new Ibis or Santa Cruz without breaking a sweat (especially if I took trade-ins).

  21. #21
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    Have you ever thought of just moving up to a more modern version of an older bike? Like an Ellsworth or Ventana or Turner? The horst link bikes seem to be the closest thing to a modern version of an older bike as far as similar geometry.

    I'm like you in the respect that I have too many bikes and only look at some of them instead of actually riding them but I find myself liking the newer (00-08) FS bikes because of their sheer level of comfort.
    No more sore wrists, ankles, shoulders from taking a beating on an old rigid Klein that's cool to show off to your friends.

  22. #22
    TrinityRiverKerplunk
    Reputation: unicrown junkie's Avatar
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    Great thread, I'm glad this came up. I agree it is totally appropriate for whatever that's worth.

    Having spent three days in Whistler two weeks ago with Internal14 and his wonderful family plus a few of his friends while they rode the bikepark, I admit I can't stand the DH crowd for the most part and the rigs they ride on. For me, this started around 1990 in Northern California, I didn't approve then and I don't now. It has been bad for the sport, we now have a multitude of fat-ass chain smokers and morons who complain about their wives while getting either on the lift or just completing another run down the bottom. Not every rider is this way, there are some great men and women on the trail, but many of these people belong at the spa or golf course, the only reason they are on the hill is because technology and ski lifts made it possible.

    This is what technology and ski lifts brought to the sport. We have dumbed down to such an incredible level; meanwhile technology has shot further forward. Not sure how it has benefited the sport as a whole.

    My favorite bike there at Whistler was a 1990 RM Fusion. Berkeley Mike, I still ride rigid and love it. I also respect your opinion but I just don't agree with it.

    Riding since '85 off-road, I made the switch back to rigid in 1999 permanently.

    Best decision I made cycling so far in my book. So, the bike bets me up a bit more now since I'm a middle-aged fart, oh well.

    No issues with shocks, no issues with stupid trigger shifters (still use XT thumbs), and so simple overall that when I see these silly DH bikes and even the trail bikes I want to throw the damn things into the aluminum recycle bin.

    Hell, bring back the original Lemurian and make everyone do it on a rigid bike. 29 miles with the Chute was great, we didn't need shocks then!

    So, dump the new bike and appreciate the old one.
    Good friction shifting is getting hard to find nowadays....

  23. #23
    It's about showing up.
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    I hear you loud and clear. Nothing goes where you point it like rigid. And weight? I totally get it. But with arthritis it kills my hands and I end up not riding due to pain up into my forearms. There is nothing heroic about that for me. It was very different when I was only 50.
    I don't rattle.

  24. #24
    It's about showing up.
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    This thread has been really good for me. I have been dragging my feet. Today I was in the shed swapping wheels (White hubs) off of the road bike and on to the Commuter. What a difference. I'll move onto the other bikes now.

    Thank you, all.
    I don't rattle.

  25. #25
    TrinityRiverKerplunk
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    Yeah, the arthritis thing in the wrists of my best friend is the very reason he uses shocks too.

    When it comes to that, well then we know what the answer is even though I may not like it.

    Don't get me wrong when I spout my large mouth off, it's solely my opinion and I always believe that in the end we all have the inherent right to choose what we should be able to ride, or not ride i terms of mtn bikes.

    If it makes you feel any better, sure wasn't fun breaking my leg for the second time on my '88 Ibis Trials Comp ten years ago now! Yeesh, here I was doing a paltry 4mph and then I did the unthinkable and broke the dang thing again!

    Took me a full four years to get back on the bike on a regular basis.

    Wish you the best in every case, have a good autumn and some great rides!

    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    I hear you loud and clear. Nothing goes where you point it like rigid. And weight? I totally get it. But with arthritis it kills my hands and I end up not riding due to pain up into my forearms. There is nothing heroic about that for me. It was very different when I was only 50.
    Good friction shifting is getting hard to find nowadays....

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