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  1. #1
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    Intro and a tasty vintage MTB informational treat

    Hi All,

    I would like to introduce myself as I think- hope, I will be spending a bit more time around these parts. I'm an ever evolving collector of vintage bicycles. I began collecting about 5 or so year ago when my old BMX (1983 SE Quadangle) was discovered my families attic. Quickly noticing how insane the collecting bug could become so, I decided to focus primarily on my previously owned bikes as well as the Fuji brand (Pre 1985 or so). I always admired Fuji's back in the day, especially the Feather Professional BMX bikes. Then, I narrowed it down even further to only bikes that are my size as the collection started to get out of control... I have a fairly extensive Fuji collection, ranging from BMX, touring, racing, track and even an 83 cruiser. Now, my reason for finally venturing to your neck of the woods.

    I had been looking, for 2 maybe 3 years, for a first year Mt. Fuji that was at least 21" and finally found one in the Seattle area a week ago. It's on its way down to me in California. Thus begins my foray into vintage mountain bikes. My very first MTB was a Trek 8?? in the late 80's after trading in a Nishiki road bike.

    At this point I'm more into preservation, original finish and catalog correct parts. I have re-chromed, re-anodized, re-painted etc in the past, but lost interest in that a few years ago. I discovered it felt better and more challenging to find good condition bikes and preserve them. It's easy and less satisfactory to refinish for me.

    So that's my intro.

    Now for the treat. I have a fairly extensive collection of Bicycling magazines and scanned this article last week after finally acquiring the Mt. Fuji. It's from the May, 1983 edition of Bicycling magazine. This is a "Workshop" article talking everything "Fat Tire bikes". It's 31 pages of vintage MTB awesomeness.

    It features the following reviews and much, much more. Any vintage MTB collector who hasn't read it should enjoy it immensely.

    Diamondback Ridge Runner (yes, Diamondback!)
    Mt. Fuji
    Ritchey MountainBikes Annapurna (wow!)
    MountainBikes Montari
    Specialized StumpJumper Sport
    Trek 850

    You can link directly to the PDF from the link below, or from my website in my sig.
    http://www.thefujiclass.com/vintage-...Mag-May-83.pdf


    Cheers!
    Brian
    http://www.VintageCrank.com
    WANTED
    Early 80's 22"+
    Ritchey
    Diamondback Ridge Runner
    Trek 850
    MountainBikes Montari(e)

  2. #2
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    That was a great read. They covered just about everything.
    Thanks for sharing.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  3. #3
    the new Gilbert Grape
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    Thanks for posting!!!!
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bloud View Post
    At this point I'm more into preservation, original finish and catalog correct parts. I have re-chromed, re-anodized, re-painted etc in the past, but lost interest in that a few years ago. I discovered it felt better and more challenging to find good condition bikes and preserve them. It's easy and less satisfactory to refinish for me.
    You'll fit in quite well here.

    Thanks for the intro and the scan. Great read!
    -eric-

    http://www.rumpfy.com

    Wanted: Syncros 27.2 x 425 seatpost, 26.8 x 400 IRD seatpost

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the cool scan!! That Annapurna deserves more photos I'd say.

  6. #6
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    Awesome - "If you haven't yet ridden a lightweight ballooner, you won't believe how good it feels". I can't believe I read that whole thing.

    What fork is that on the bike on the cover page? It doesn't look like any they reviewed.

  7. #7
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    Do you by chance have the June '82 issue with the Koski Trailmaster review?

  8. #8
    マスターの自転車整備士
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    This was the 2nd of two articles John Schubert wrote for Bicycling Mag, the 1st a year earlier, in June 1982. In that article, Schubert made a prophetic statement:

    "... All this leads me to a startling conclusion: I predict that klunkers will overtake dropped handlebar ten-speeds as America's favorite bicycles just as soon as enough manufacturers make them available in appropriate quantities and price levels."

    Which led to the 2nd article, and its first paragraph. When that issue came out and I read that, I was hooked. I spent the next four months test riding every MTB that was available in my price range until I decided on the '83 Schwinn High Sierra; the rest is history.

    Thanks for posting... to me, that article was a watershed event in the history of the MTB, and was responsible for much of the early surge in mid level mountain bike sales. Remember... at this time the showrooms of most bike shops were filled with ten speeds, and the mountain bikes were relegated to a corner of the showroom floor!


  9. #9
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    Thanks for the replies!

    Quote Originally Posted by blilrat View Post
    Awesome - "If you haven't yet ridden a lightweight ballooner, you won't believe how good it feels". I can't believe I read that whole thing.

    What fork is that on the bike on the cover page? It doesn't look like any they reviewed.
    I don't know but looks like an early Landing Gear used on SE bikes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed View Post
    Do you by chance have the June '82 issue with the Koski Trailmaster review?
    I'm sure I do. The collection is at the office and I can look tomorrow.
    Brian
    http://www.VintageCrank.com
    WANTED
    Early 80's 22"+
    Ritchey
    Diamondback Ridge Runner
    Trek 850
    MountainBikes Montari(e)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldskoolwrench View Post
    This was the 2nd of two articles John Schubert wrote for Bicycling Mag, the 1st a year earlier, in June 1982. In that article, Schubert made a prophetic statement:
    Thanks for that info. I know what I'll be scanning next!

    I remember very well the day I first saw a MTB in my local shop. I also remember shortly there after borrowing one from the mechanic and riding through corn fields and feeling more exhausted from a ride than ever...
    Brian
    http://www.VintageCrank.com
    WANTED
    Early 80's 22"+
    Ritchey
    Diamondback Ridge Runner
    Trek 850
    MountainBikes Montari(e)

  11. #11
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    cool scans, THANKS!....I too borrowed a bike and rode through a cornfield my first ride..it was muddy(springtime in ohio)..very difficult...and for some reason...it changed my life!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by syklystt View Post
    cool scans, THANKS!....I too borrowed a bike and rode through a cornfield my first ride..it was muddy(springtime in ohio)..very difficult...and for some reason...it changed my life!

    The talk of cornfield rides made me think of this video my kids were enjoying recently.


    The first MTB I saw was my friend's High Sierra. I was blown away 'cause we'd do these quasi-XC rides with friends on our BMX bikes through the local hills and then to see this big-wheeled machine with low gears, full leg extension, and powerful brakes, it was a must have! My world was changed forever and the trails I once thought were far soon became close.

    As for that gray fork on the first photo, it looks to be a Type II mounted on a Potts. More pics of that bike please!
    Last edited by Fillet-brazed; 05-28-2013 at 09:46 AM.

  13. #13
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    That was a great read. I also liked looking at the old ads. Man, the 80's were a different time...(:
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  14. #14
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    Klunkers of Marin Bicycling Magazine June 82 article

    Here is part one of John Schubert's article on Klunkers, Fat tire bikes, etc. This also has the test of Erik Koski's Trailmaster among others.

    http://www.thefujiclass.com/vintage-...cling-6-82.pdf
    Brian
    http://www.VintageCrank.com
    WANTED
    Early 80's 22"+
    Ritchey
    Diamondback Ridge Runner
    Trek 850
    MountainBikes Montari(e)

  15. #15
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    and thanks again......82'...WOW...thats the year I quit bicycles and went motorized....a few years later my mindset was that adults shoud ride motorcycles and I shunned the new mountain bikes...in 89 I finally bought my first mountain bike (coerced by friends)...I cannot believe that I missed the years inbetween them on a bicycle...I have not slowed down a bit since.....with hopes of a couple/few more decades to go...I still twist a trotlle, but bicycles come first.

  16. #16
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    Keep em coming, that's great stuff.

    CK (if you're reading this), nice job on the "off-road technique" article. Being among the first to ever cover this topic, it would have been real easy to spout out something that would be embarrassingly wrong 3 decades later, but your stuff holds up.

    The mention of the King Sting was kind of cool for me since I have an '81 and realize it was a rather weak attempt by Schwinn. And even though they were rightfully critical of it, the mention still gives it some VRC cred (at least in my mind).
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  17. #17
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    as I read the this old stuff (I also got a set of FTF mags from CK)....its very interesting to see how many of the pioneers of this sport were so spot on in many ways. Since we have the history to reflect on, it appears that there was some great thinking goin on....and much of it still holds true today.....very cool stuff.

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