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  1. #1
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    Fat City Cycles mystique?

    Do any of you think the mystique of or interest in Fat City bikes will drop off? Today my wife said "don't you dare sell the purple one, but maybe sell the blue one". Regarding our Fats. I hesitate because she might think differently when there isn't snow falling on the ground or 3 mini kids in the house that include 11 month old twins. FWIW: Blue = Yo with suspension fork and purple = rigid 1 inch steerer Yo fork turned Burley puller. I don't think there's a sweeter hard tail, but she had a Shocka and just might want a modern squishy bike if she gets into it again.

    Thanks for any opinions.

  2. #2
    the new Gilbert Grape
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    Predicting the market on anything is impossible. Fats seem to have a decent value right now. But will they in 10 years? 20? 50?

    A lot of value right now probably comes from people who either have owned Fats for years, or from those who always wanted one. Will that still exist in 5-10 years? Probably so. In 50... probably not.

    Try making sense of the vintage road bike market and transfer what you learn to MTBs. Generally well-made bikes retain some value, but some bikes are worth more than their quality suggests they should be worth. Where Fats end up in the long term is hard to predict, but they will always be worth something.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  3. #3
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    Fat City mystique

    [QUOTE=bitflogger]Do any of you think the mystique of or interest in Fat City bikes will drop off?

    As a big Fat City fan, I think that the mystique probably had something to do with being in the game early on, making great products and having a cool attitude. That said, I could have been equally happy riding and collecting other brands that hit the same marks; Ibis, Salsa, Mountain Goat, etc. come to mind.
    As for value 50 years from now, I have no illusions that my garage full of Fats will fund my retirement, but my kids do debate about who gets which bike when I kick the bucket.
    Some of the truly innovative builders (Cunningham, Breezer Series 1, 2 & 3, Potts, etc.)will no doubt hold their value, but as in collecting anything it's really anyone's guess I suppose.
    So buy and ride what you like, if it appreciates in value, all the better, but the ride is the thing!

  4. #4
    Sneaker man
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    the thing is, back 10-15 years ago when these sorts of bikes were made, and made a name for themselves, people really wanted them... lusted after them (i know i did) and now much later you have people that (to stereo type)...a) really wanted them, but didn't have the money and now much later do have the money so why not buy them or b) the people that did have them, but moved on with the times/technology, but now think that gee these were cool i want one again.
    laffeaux, i right, in 10 years they still be worth something but after that maybe not, because, apart from people like us who dredge these old things up, who's even going to know what a fat chance was? they'll be wanting intenses and elsworths and stuff that is a bit exclusive today... most of the younger riders i know have never heard of fat or yeti or think manitou make forks not frames... sad days...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git
    the thing is, back 10-15 years ago when these sorts of bikes were made, and made a name for themselves, people really wanted them... lusted after them (i know i did) and now much later you have people that (to stereo type)...a) really wanted them, but didn't have the money and now much later do have the money so why not buy them or b) the people that did have them, but moved on with the times/technology, but now think that gee these were cool i want one again.
    laffeaux, i right, in 10 years they still be worth something but after that maybe not, because, apart from people like us who dredge these old things up, who's even going to know what a fat chance was? they'll be wanting intenses and elsworths and stuff that is a bit exclusive today... most of the younger riders i know have never heard of fat or yeti or think manitou make forks not frames... sad days...
    I fit in the A catagory, but money wasn't really the constraint. Lack of info, pre internet, no FAT import in NL, so no availability through LBS and at my age I simply weren't able to work this out. Now I am

    Whatever will happen with the FAT value, I will always end up with a rocksolid piece of art that provides me a enjoyable ride. For me this is the only denominator as I have the intention to never sell my FAT.
    CU @ OWMTBC 2010

  6. #6
    Illuminati
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    We the people ...

    interest in FAT may remain longer than you think. AS much as I'd never own an IF, their history is well documented. Owning an original will always appeal.

    who can 2nd guess the market tho? M900 XTR mechs sell for massive prices & they were mass produced! grafton/ cook bros items still command generally high prices.

    certainly it takes a very/ rare special bike for its worth to actually increase. In FATs case I'd guess these would be either wedding tandems or 10th anniversarys due to the limited numbers!

    If anyone knows of a 10th for sale please private mail me!

  7. #7
    the new Gilbert Grape
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    Quote Originally Posted by fat chance guy
    So buy and ride what you like, if it appreciates in value, all the better, but the ride is the thing!
    This is the best piece of advice.

    And as to what determines ultimate value... Masi road bikes have an extremely high value in the US. Are they better than a Colnago or DeRosa of the same age? Probably not. The reason they're worth more is that the kid in the movie "Breaking Away" rode one, and that got a lot of guys into cycling. Sometimes value is derived from things beyond your control.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

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