Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 101 to 165 of 165
  1. #101
    dirtbag
    Reputation: ranier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,440
    Browsing the pics to get ideas on my future project. Cool bikes in this thread!
    Amolan

  2. #102
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    10

    '91 Nishiki Cascade

    As shown in the pics, the Cascade was brought out of storage after almost 20 years (the ex-wife didn't want it back then!) and in excellent condition with no corrosion!! Cycle Pro Motivator 2.1 gumwall tires are original with no cracking on original Araya rims!! The neon paint is excellent with NO fading!! Original Shimano STX derailleurs, along with a Deore crank and low-profile cantis that I installed when it was first brought home from the dealer. The original white leg version SCOTT Unishock fork was also installed at the time, which now needs to be serviced and checked ... they are not compressing freely. The elastomer springs need to be replaced. Also installed at the time of purchase were the cool aluminum Onza bar ends.

    My restoration effort was basically cleaning, polishing, and lubing. She rides like a champ! I found an excellent condition RS Mag 21 for a measly $50 on Craig's List that replaced the SCOTT Unishock. And thanks to Ebay, the crank set and shifters/brakes have been all replaced with vintage STX.

    This Richard Cunningham designed e-stay frame was especially handsome in the small size. The dimensions and proportions highlighted its compactness . . . much nicer than my e-stay Haro Extreme Comp at the time (which mimicked the Yeti Ultimate).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-picture-7.jpg  


  3. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4
    I found this at a thrift store. The design is really similar to a Haro Extreme except for the top tube which doesn't have the bend before the seat post. There are no decals besides the brand and model and one on the headtube.
    All of the components seem to be original except for the saddle and what I replaced to fix it up (cables, seat tube QR, rear der.). Everything is Shimano Exage 300 LX.

    Has anybody heard of Aggressor before? I haven't been able to find anything online. I found it in Bellingham, WA, so I'm thinking it could have been a Canadian brand or something.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-aggressor.jpg  

    Last edited by Dog Case; 03-10-2012 at 09:38 PM.

  4. #104
    dirtbag
    Reputation: ranier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,440
    ^^^cool, looks like early 90's based on paint scheme and exage components. Sorry, can't add any more...
    Amolan

  5. #105
    dirtbag
    Reputation: ranier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,440
    Just realized I haven't posted my e-stay, so...

    Here's mine, a '94 Alpinestars D900 with NOS Noleen Crosslink fork. No original parts (sorry VRC purists), all modern parts hung on a old revived frame.
    Amolan

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation: felixdelrio's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    132
    This is my '93 Alpinestars E900 with matching pc parts. Welcome VRC purists!











    purveyor of leftfield brands

    Pablo Picasso: "Good taste is the enemy of creativity"

  7. #107
    mtbr member
    Reputation: geckocycles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    330
    If I may chime in here.
    RC was the first to use this design or at least make it popular. He later designed bikes for Nishiki which was probably the first major manufacturer to use it. Others licensed designs from him including the bolt on rear sections and most just stole his work.
    IMHO no one did as much engineering on special tube design as I did. For the most part every MFG that used this design including RC did not have the proper tubes engineered to make them stiff and reliable as they should have.
    I was working at RC's shop when the first ones were made and saw first hand what was needed. I was consulting with RC and his dad and Mark Grayson and had my drawings on the table when Zap walked in and copied them exactly and decided to build their Ultimate bike off those drawings. I was having an engineer at Raytheon do the analysis of the tubing needed and had Tange make the special tubes for me which took some time to have them deliver them. In the mean time Zap came out with their Ultimate which he took credit for and claimed I copied him. I was not going to produce a bike without the correct tubing as I had built ones and saw the failures in all the expected places well before the MBA bike.
    Later I had the first one with the new tubing at RC's shop and Zap showed up and took it while I was skiing and did their article on mine in the Most Innovative Products of the Year issue in 89.
    E Bikes have continually gotten a bad rap because all the MFG's used standard tubing in their designs and messed with known working geometry because the design would allow it. There was little reason to shorten the rear as short as most did unless you were making a stand up climbing bike. I have literally a 1" thick folder on the engineering of this bike giving me what every inch long piece of tubing needs to be for riders in 50 lb increments uo to 300 lbs to dead drop 6'. I had engineers put accelerometers on the first protos to aid in this analysis checking. I have yet to have a frame fail and still have one and ride one when I can. 2 yrs after the first one in 89 I decided to soften up the ride with more engineering of the rear end. This did make the bike have more side to side movement which took some getting used to. Cromo is really good at storing energy and giving it back when not applying forces to it. This new proto design was giving to the Wrecking Crew in 91 to test and once again it was in the Most Innovative Products issue.
    This was my first E-Bike that was sold to Pat Hannum and went to MBA.

    This is the one that I ride today and was built when I was 160 lbs and survived my stint to 300 lb and to todays weight of 230. It has a proto Rock Shock long travel Ti Mag 21 on it that was made for Steve Boehmke.

    I worked with Rock Shock on another fork project trying to design a kids fork for my son's 10" wheel Slickrock Jr. RS ES Bike when they were here in Boulder. The idea was scraped as there is just not enough weight on the front end to make the fork work well enough for the weight penalty of having said it is a FS kids bike.

    Slickrock Jr
    Last edited by geckocycles; 03-11-2012 at 08:14 AM.
    [SIGPIC]http://www.geckocycles.com[/SIGPIC]

    There is but one rule in life. "First one to the finish line wins!"
    VVA

  8. #108
    mtbr member
    Reputation: geckocycles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    330
    I must be getting old. I previously posted most of this info. LOL
    [SIGPIC]http://www.geckocycles.com[/SIGPIC]

    There is but one rule in life. "First one to the finish line wins!"
    VVA

  9. #109
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,425
    Quote Originally Posted by geckocycles View Post
    I must be getting old. I previously posted most of this info. LOL
    Thanks for posting it again. I wonder how this model stacks up in tubing specification. The decal says Tange MTB double butted tubing. It appears to be pretty stout judging by weight.


    <img src="http://i726.photobucket.com/albums/ww261/tomslawns/100_1605-1.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

  10. #110
    mtbr member
    Reputation: geckocycles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    330
    To my knowledge the tubing I had Tange make for me was proprietary to me. I did not sell any to other MFG's not to say that they didn't share the info but I didn't tell Tange was these tubes were for but with a little research I'm sure they could of figured it out or sold other based on specs alone.
    The most special tube was the ST. It had a thick wall bottom and that section was very long compared to others. The others were just longer and shorter versions of what they already offered. I used O too thin aircraft for the stays and it took some doing to get them bent which RC did for me on his DiAcro bender.
    [SIGPIC]http://www.geckocycles.com[/SIGPIC]

    There is but one rule in life. "First one to the finish line wins!"
    VVA

  11. #111
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,425
    Quote Originally Posted by geckocycles View Post
    To my knowledge the tubing I had Tange make for me was proprietary to me. I did not sell any to other MFG's not to say that they didn't share the info but I didn't tell Tange was these tubes were for but with a little research I'm sure they could of figured it out or sold other based on specs alone.
    The most special tube was the ST. It had a thick wall bottom and that section was very long compared to others. The others were just longer and shorter versions of what they already offered. I used O too thin aircraft for the stays and it took some doing to get them bent which RC did for me on his DiAcro bender.
    This set is 32mm st squashed at the bottom and 35mm DT-TT. I do not know what the diameters or butting lengths. My spring project is to make it rideable again for curiosity's sake.

  12. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation: stan lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    485
    A lot of early safety bikes used an elevated stay design...I wonder if this is where RC and some of the other guys got there ideas?





    These ones ^ may have small rods or cables going from the bb to the dropout but I know some did not.

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation: datawhacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    211
    no real new bike ideas since around 1900. Clipless pedals were around then too.

    Seems like e-stays came and went fast, like maybe 89-93?

    Was the Kestrel the first e-stay design? Mrazeks are definitely the last.

  14. #114
    poser Administrator
    Reputation: rockcrusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    9,047
    Quote Originally Posted by geckocycles View Post
    RC developed the E-Stay Mantis first.
    I had a drawing of the Genesis on his table when the editor of Mountain Bike Action (Zap) came in and saw my drawing and proto and took the liberty of approaching Yeti to build their project bike based on my proto. If you recall then the mag was referred to by many as Yeti Action.
    I had been working with RC on design improvements for some time and my prototype was in the shop and was taken by Zap and they did held onto it for over 3 months and did the article "Most Innovative Products of the Year" in 89 and that bike was in that issue.
    I had Tange make a special seat tube for the Genesis. I have yet to have had a failure to my knowledge. Most if not all the followers of RC's first designs had failures for they tried to mass produce them without the testing that I did before production and realized their week points. I proto tested the design for over 2 years before final production of the Genesis in 91 begun. About 300 Gecko bikes were produced.
    This was the first bike that was produced in 90 and was a proto as well and MBA did their test on. Again this bike made it in "The Most Innovative Products of the Year" issue in 91.

    3/4"x .028" chainstays, custom seat tube and 1.25" strut to down tube were the only mods to this bike done in final production.

    All Genesis bikes had this unique housing actuated cable pull derailleur designed by me.


    The Genesis also had a unique horizontal/vertical dropout design that in a pinch you could move the wheel out of the vertical position and move it forward in case you broke a chain or deraillure and needed a bit of adjustment for a single speed. The brakes still lined up with the rim so no adjustment was needed there. Here are the 2 different designs of those drops.
    Wow that blew some dust out of my brain! I totally remember that bike or at least the one in the MBA. I particularly thought the sloped TT was a great idea so you could shoulder the bike, which of course was hard to do on the E-stay bikes. I had/have a mantis XCR-EC and really never thought it was that poor performing or any of the things so many elevated chainstay detractors say. But of course it was hard to measure flex of the frame against grafton cranks, bullseye hubs and noodly handlebars. I mean what was flexing the most? Probably the cranks and the hubs with a little free play.

    Thanks for posting those pictures!
    Try this: HTFU

  15. #115
    mtbr member
    Reputation: datawhacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    211
    thanks for the history lesson and all the interesting details

  16. #116
    VRC Illuminati
    Reputation: Rumpfy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    17,616
    Quote Originally Posted by geckocycles View Post
    IMHO no one did as much engineering on special tube design as I did.
    Sorry, I'm missing the humble part of that statement.



    Very interesting telling of events though! I'm not takin sides, but it'd be interesting to hear Zap give his account of how it all went down too.
    -eric-

    http://www.rumpfy.com
    Wanted: NDS Suntour XC Pro Microdrive 175mm Crank Arm.

  17. #117
    VRC Hound
    Reputation: bushpig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,270
    Screw Zap.

  18. #118
    VRC Illuminati
    Reputation: Rumpfy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    17,616
    Quote Originally Posted by bushpig View Post
    Screw Zap.
    I'd consider it to get that C-26 out of his possession.
    -eric-

    http://www.rumpfy.com
    Wanted: NDS Suntour XC Pro Microdrive 175mm Crank Arm.

  19. #119
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    197
    I have a '93 Nishiki Alien in purple. Love it, and still commute on it.

    A lot like this one but mine has Rock Shox MAG-21s up front:


  20. #120
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    212
    I think Richard Cunningham was possibly the first with the bikes he designed for Nishiki who I worked for at the time. Unfortunately the quality control on those bikes was not always up to Richard's design standards. Nishiki's motto for the Cunningham design bikes was "Engineering That Really Works". My inside joke was "Engineering That Rarely Works". Needless to say I did not work for them forever!

    These designs later trickled down to the Haro line of bikes which were also being built by West Coast Cycle (later Raleigh) that owned Nishiki & Haro at the time.

  21. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Weinerts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    307

    I loved mine!

    Quote Originally Posted by flyingcloud View Post
    I think Richard Cunningham was possibly the first with the bikes he designed for Nishiki who I worked for at the time. Unfortunately the quality control on those bikes was not always up to Richard's design standards. Nishiki's motto for the Cunningham design bikes was "Engineering That Really Works". My inside joke was "Engineering That Rarely Works". Needless to say I did not work for them forever!

    These designs later trickled down to the Haro line of bikes which were also being built by West Coast Cycle (later Raleigh) that owned Nishiki & Haro at the time.
    I loved the purple beast! I went through a red one (original) green one and a blue one before all the tubes were aligned. at last it worked great!

    Here it is in is glory days on a summer trip to England.

    An yokota showed up again on craigslist in San Diego today.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-scanned-document.jpg  

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-3g83fc3m35lb5e55m4d4b1c2d28e5ea6f1b41.jpg  

    My bike is heavier than yours - it does not have Carbon or Titanium parts - I love it!

  22. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,683
    I made this in 1988, maybe 1989
    Last edited by patineto; 04-11-2013 at 04:10 PM.

  23. #123
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    15
    I know someone already mentioned this, but elevated chainstays are still used in some full-suspension designs. This is probably because rear suspension requires more robust tubing, and since the weight penalty has already been imposed, it's also possible to use the e-stay design without the extreme level of optimization Gecko Cycles was trying to achieve. I have a Pro-Flex 756 and a Pro-Flex 857 that used an e-stay design in 1996-97 (respectively), and the Santa Cruz Superlight uses an e-stay design to this day. I figure when my 756 frame finally dies, I'll probably replace it with a Superlight...or maybe a Blur, I dunno.

    Gratuitous pic follows:




  24. #124
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    420
    nice proflex...I rode an 856 for years, best climbing bike i've ever had...Im going to geta k2 4000 frame tonight I hope.
    Proflex was a pioneer in FS bikes and patented the true "sweet spot" for pivots on a mountainb ike...IMO.

  25. #125
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    14
    I have a 1989 Titan 1/2Trac with e-stays. It's a terrific bike and built like a tank. It's from the pre-suspension days, but it is a good all-day off road rig.

  26. #126
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eric Malcolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,036
    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_0214.jpgElevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_0218.jpgName:  IMG_0268.JPG
Views: 1723
Size:  41.8 KBElevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_0204.jpg

    Hi.

    I have an interpretation of the E-stay that I built 2 yrs ago. I live in a part of the world where these bikes really did not make an appearance and came across a picture of one while looking for bike components. The bike was a Mzarek with a Brooks Professional saddle. That image stuck in my mind for a long time and I eventually studied these bikes on the Inter-net. I learned all the failings, the joys and the adventures that the early bikes gave. I drew up my bike as a concept, sketched it as a 3-D drawing, imagined where the forces acted on the frame and looked at tubing specifications that seemed to me to fit the unique requirements from off the shelf manufacturer/suppliers. The BB and seat tube are the key area's I concluded. KB's original design data confirm my thoughts, though I knew nothing of this info when I put my frame together.

    I have an interest in older designs and consider how they might look if updated into a modern context, making them look both contemporary and futuristic. I spoke with my riding buddies of my project and was asked if I had ever ridden one, to which I said 'No, I will find out once this Bike is done'. Well, I can say that I never regreted doing this ride. I kept faithful to the original look and wheel size. My ride needs were for a Sunday morning road ride, a weekly commute to work with a long way home ride on single track/gravel. The frame is as stiff as anything out there. Climbs very well, handles as though on rails and is remarkably soft on the saddle in ride terms. I love the fact that when it comes time to clean it down, just how easy it is to get your fingers around everything (no oily chainstays). The wheels swap over real easy and having one bike for everything means I am intimate with all its handling characteristics. The overall bike weighs in at 22lbs, light for single track, heavy for road. My only change to the bike has been to the forks, a lighter more nimble fork has been fitted.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  27. #127
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fillet-brazed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,696
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Malcolm View Post

    Hi.

    I have an interpretation of the E-stay that I built 2 yrs ago. I live in a part of the world where these bikes really did not make an appearance and came across a picture of one while looking for bike components. The bike was a Mzarek with a Brooks Professional saddle. That image stuck in my mind for a long time and I eventually studied these bikes on the Inter-net. I learned all the failings, the joys and the adventures that the early bikes gave. I drew up my bike as a concept, sketched it as a 3-D drawing, imagined where the forces acted on the frame and looked at tubing specifications that seemed to me to fit the unique requirements from off the shelf manufacturer/suppliers. The BB and seat tube are the key area's I concluded. KB's original design data confirm my thoughts, though I knew nothing of this info when I put my frame together.

    I have an interest in older designs and consider how they might look if updated into a modern context, making them look both contemporary and futuristic. I spoke with my riding buddies of my project and was asked if I had ever ridden one, to which I said 'No, I will find out once this Bike is done'. Well, I can say that I never regreted doing this ride. I kept faithful to the original look and wheel size. My ride needs were for a Sunday morning road ride, a weekly commute to work with a long way home ride on single track/gravel. The frame is as stiff as anything out there. Climbs very well, handles as though on rails and is remarkably soft on the saddle in ride terms. I love the fact that when it comes time to clean it down, just how easy it is to get your fingers around everything (no oily chainstays). The wheels swap over real easy and having one bike for everything means I am intimate with all its handling characteristics. The overall bike weighs in at 22lbs, light for single track, heavy for road. My only change to the bike has been to the forks, a lighter more nimble fork has been fitted.

    Eric
    Good looking bike. What is that on the back of the seat tube?

  28. #128
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eric Malcolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,036
    The seat tube feature that I think you refer to is my seat stem clamp. I use a carbon seat stem and wanted to have a 'soft' clamping effect on it rather than squeeze it to death. Split twin bolt arrangement that is symmetrical. I use 2 x 5mm bolts at low torque and it has never moved. I got frustrated with seat stem slippage, and unwittingly having leg cramps that this resulted in as the stem slipped incrementally down over a period of time....
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  29. #129
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fillet-brazed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,696
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Malcolm View Post
    The seat tube feature that I think you refer to is my seat stem clamp. I use a carbon seat stem and wanted to have a 'soft' clamping effect on it rather than squeeze it to death. Split twin bolt arrangement that is symmetrical. I use 2 x 5mm bolts at low torque and it has never moved. I got frustrated with seat stem slippage, and unwittingly having leg cramps that this resulted in as the stem slipped incrementally down over a period of time....
    Ya, would love to see a pic or two.

  30. #130
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eric Malcolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,036
    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_0205.jpgElevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_0206.jpg[

    Try this.

    The clamps are folded plate steel, 1.8mm, they are double thickness where the bolts go through.
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  31. #131
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    1

    Mrazek- not Cinelli

    Quote Originally Posted by da'HOOV View Post
    That "Cinelli" looks exactly like the Mrazek...who built what? Does anyone know the story?"

    Bo Mrazek builds frames in the Vrbno, Czech Republic. The photo noted is of a Mrazek, not a Cinelli. Having never seen the Cinlelli, I would be hard presssed to say if Mrazek built it for Cinelli. I do know that my Mrazek and all the rest were built Boh Mrazek Sr.

    Here are some details.
    mrazek

  32. #132
    bipolar-roller
    Reputation: singletrackmack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    A few early FS e-stay bikes

    1990 Offroad Pro-flex FS with e-stays.
    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-1990-offroad-proflex.jpg

    1995 Dual Suspension Bike of the Year from Mountain Biking Mag. I have an 856 (same bike, but a 1996) under my house somewhere, but no pic handy.
    Name:  proflex e-stay bike of year.JPG
Views: 1559
Size:  88.5 KB

    My 555. This bike climbs like a billy goat and is a blast on tight twisty forest trails.
    Name:  555 w Girvin AL side.JPG
Views: 1648
Size:  45.8 KB
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

    "I only had like two winekills captain buzzcooler"

  33. #133
    ARCHQUEST
    Reputation: fjyang's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    152
    I'll share my elevated bike, Its made by Top Image that I got off ebay a while back and I like it cause its use of oversize aluminum tubing that reminds me of my Cannondal's from the 80's which makes it look apart from other skinny tube elevated frames. Put it together with spare parts I have around, Noleen CrossLink forks, Magura Hydraulic rim brake and Cane Creek seat buster. Not vintage or correct for the die hards but I like it.








  34. #134
    ...
    Reputation: ameybrook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,505
    At least you're consistent


    Why would you own 100 Yugos when you could own 1 Porsche? - Rumpfy



  35. #135
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    248
    Mrazek never built for Cinelli simply because Cinelli used to have their own welders. Their ec bike was the "next machine": Fisher design, Columbus Max, Campy gruppo, circa 1991... see the google search page

    https://www.google.com/search?q=cine...w=1280&bih=923

  36. #136
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    30
    I'm digging this thread out to mention Caloi in Brazil has a whole line of "cruiser" or "city" bikes based on the same 26"-wheel elevated chainstay frame. Here's a sample.

    People convert these to XC bikes sometimes and beat them up until the stays break spectacularly - they all eventually do.

    BTW I found this thread while looking for info on Mrazek frames and whether they have that same weakness - is that an "el" problem?
    Last edited by Babe Ruthless; 02-24-2015 at 06:30 PM.

  37. #137
    rismtb
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    512
    In 1989 for some reason the image of the Mantis XCR in the pages of MountianBike Action sticks in my brain like crazy glue. I remember not wanting to leave the throne enthralled with the glowing review of the "revolutionary" chain stay design. I wasn't loaded but had just enough to spend a whopping amount to order a 19 inch blue and chrome fork XCR. It came in the mail a month later and built it up with the latest greatest Syncros stuff and headed out to local trails. The second ride I bent the straight blade Tange fork. After another 2 rides and putting another fork on the rear bolt on stays came apart at the seat tube and stripped the hole. What a #$%^@ nightmare! I never believe bike reviews anymore. I did enjoy not having to break my chain to take it off. That was the only feature

  38. #138
    Phobia of petting zoos.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    854
    Quote Originally Posted by rismtb View Post
    What a #$%^@ nightmare! I never believe bike reviews anymore. I did enjoy not having to break my chain to take it off. That was the only feature
    That's some tough luck right there. Masde worse by the fact that you saved to build your dream bike which fell apart after a few months.

    The magazine review thing though, they only test how the bike rides and never get to test whether the thing falls apart after their 2 week test period. Which is a shame, because we all like to keep our bikes for more than 3 months.

    I always thought about the chain breaking thing, by the time you got the derailleur apart to take the chain out, it would be just as easy to break the chain, wouldn't it? Or am I missing something (as usual)?

    Grumps

  39. #139
    rismtb
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    512
    With the elevated stays the chain doesn't run thru the frame. just undo 1 jockey wheel and the chain comes right off in one piece ya that part was sweet for cleaning the links

  40. #140
    Stokeless Asshat
    Reputation: jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,353
    You still have to fish it out of the front derailleur.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  41. #141
    Phobia of petting zoos.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    854
    Quote Originally Posted by rismtb View Post
    With the elevated stays the chain doesn't run thru the frame. just undo 1 jockey wheel and the chain comes right off in one piece ya that part was sweet for cleaning the links
    I realise the chain doesn't run through the frame (I have an AlpineStars as well as 2 Santa Cruz Superlights and a Bullit) but it was the bit about pulling the derailleur to bits. If it's simply one jockey wheel then swing the cage open, then all good, except...

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    You still have to fish it out of the front derailleur.
    5 seconds with a phillips head, but wrestling it past the chainrings could be a PITA.

    Meh, joiner links FTW.

    Grumps

  42. #142
    rismtb
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    512
    yes its coming back to me now, the front thread thing. Still better than breaking the chain. I didn't have the bike long so I only did it couple of times.

  43. #143
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,101
    I believe the first elevated chain stay bike was a project bike that MBA had Yeti build for them back in 1987/88. Richard Cunningham of Mantis soon followed with the XCR, then shortly after he designed the Nishiki Alien.

  44. #144
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,053
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post

    I always thought about the chain breaking thing, by the time you got the derailleur apart to take the chain out, it would be just as easy to break the chain, wouldn't it? Or am I missing something (as usual)?

    Grumps
    Back then if a Shimano chain didn't explode by itself you sure didn't want to mess with a good thing. That was about the only good thing about elevated bikes. Then again you had to take the chain off every 8-12 months anyways to warranty the broken frame.

  45. #145
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1

    Malvern Star Pro-tech 500M

    Anyone know more about the Malvern Star Pro-tech 500M elevated chainstay bike?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_20150529_221001.jpg  

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_20150529_234729.jpg  

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_20150529_234818.jpg  

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_20150529_234846.jpg  

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_20150529_235204.jpg  


  46. #146
    Phobia of petting zoos.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    854
    Quote Originally Posted by Taiv View Post
    Anyone know more about the Malvern Star Pro-tech 500M elevated chainstay bike?
    What did you want to know?

    They were made in the far east and distributed by Malvern Star in the early 90s. Low end parts on a not-particularly-great frame.

    That said, growing up in Australia in the 70s, 80s or 90s, you weren't a true Aussie without a Malvern Star or a Repco of some sort.

    Grumps

  47. #147
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    26

    My e-stay bikes

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_3063.jpgElevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_2237.jpg

    Cannondale se2000
    Nishiki Alienn

  48. #148
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chefmiguel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,513
    Like that Alien!
    Technology dragass

  49. #149
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    9
    1990 Overbury's Pioneer.




  50. #150
    gobsmacked Moderator
    Reputation: girlonbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    8,720
    Quote Originally Posted by eating_trifles View Post
    1990 Overbury's Pioneer.
    Great pictures!

  51. #151
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by JokerW View Post
    No pictures of a Brave with only a single elevated chainstay?
    I remember seeing those around once in awhile back in '89-'91.
    Ive got one... just building it up.

  52. #152
    CBI 2L
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    231
    This is sort of interesting... Apparently Doug B built this bike in May of 1987 (also reflected in his serial number log book)


  53. #153
    VRC Illuminati
    Reputation: Rumpfy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    17,616
    Post the 'now' pic of that bike.
    -eric-

    http://www.rumpfy.com
    Wanted: NDS Suntour XC Pro Microdrive 175mm Crank Arm.

  54. #154
    CBI 2L
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    231
    As requested


  55. #155
    gobsmacked Moderator
    Reputation: girlonbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    8,720

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.

    Shitfire. Nice picture! Awesome bike! Does it do wheelies?!!

  56. #156
    CBI 2L
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    231
    Not sure about this bike's wheelie prowess... I can only say that the Merlin can be a handful!

  57. #157
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DoubleCentury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,946
    Quote Originally Posted by SMRTIN View Post
    I can only say that the Merlin can be a handful!
    It's the fault of the brakes.

  58. #158
    mtbr member
    Reputation: yo-Nate-y's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,732
    Did you polish through any of the tubes? I like the red Turbo/red toe-strap combo on the '87 pic.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  59. #159
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    3





  60. #160
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Funrover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,777
    Love the Estay! I still ride my Alpinestar Cro mega, love that bike, it climbs like a champ. I have owned (and now miss) Pro flex bikes in the past. Wish I could keep them all!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-dscn1386.jpg  


  61. #161
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    381
    Richard sent me a prototype Alien in 1988 after I broke my Mantis XCR non E stay. I really liked the alien and soon broke it while in NorCal. Lucky for me I used to work at Velo club bike shop in San Carlos and the owner fixed it for me. It broke in a few more spots but by then my XCR was fixed and my new e stay Valkyrie made it to me. I think people would be wise to listen to Ken on the so cal scene history. Zap had his own agenda to be sure. Thanks to Richard and Eddie for making Mantis bikes!

    Kinda cool the e stay is back with Salsa and truck making plus size bikes now. bike design always cycles around and around
    SalsaTiMukluk
    Salsa Fargo
    Salsa Cutthroat
    Salsa Blackborow DS
    Pivot Switchblade

  62. #162
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jet Black's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    45
    I seem to remember reading old issues of Mountain Bike Action and other mags from the '90s saying that elevated stays made for better climbing. Not sure if true, but my 1992 Cirrus was a beast on hills back in the day, but that could have been as much me being 20 years younger as the bike being better

    Still riding my first, although she's setup as a commuter right now. I have taken her on some trails and it's still a blast to ride (though the old Rock Shox can't hold a candle to modern forks).

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-2016-07-12-19.47.38-hdr.jpg
    2016 Rocky Mountain Blizzard
    2016 Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt
    1992 Rocky Mountain Cirrus

  63. #163
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Weinerts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    307

    New puppy

    I loved my aliens - broke 3
    Here is my new craigslist findElevated chainstay bike history questions.-img_0870.jpgName:  IMG_0842.JPG
Views: 306
Size:  40.0 KB
    My bike is heavier than yours - it does not have Carbon or Titanium parts - I love it!

  64. #164
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikefx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Weinerts View Post
    I loved my aliens - broke 3
    Here is my new craigslist findClick image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0870.jpg 
Views:	8 
Size:	195.2 KB 
ID:	1135472Name:  IMG_0842.JPG
Views: 306
Size:  40.0 KB
    AH! The 15.5" chainstay wonder!!!
    Possibly the shortest chainstays ever on an adult MTB.

  65. #165
    mtbr member
    Reputation: geckocycles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    330

    Saying goodbye to my last Genesis.

    This was a replacement frame for my X wife made in 95. Her bike met a sad end in a roof mounted bikes and garage meetup. Top of door hit seatpost. Bent IRD seatpost, top of TT at HT, Fork steerer and HT. So weird. I would of thought the fork would of ripped out of the fork mount before all this damage.
    Ripped the HT clean off my son's Slickrock Jr. His bike was replaced completely. Tig bikes break and brazed will bend. Can't tell you how many times I have seen this.
    Vics1.JPG

    Finally decided to get rid of it to a guy in Germany. Not sure why I gave it away for only $600. This was the last of 2 Genesis's and 1 Y Bike I made in a short run while at Lennard Zinn's shop.

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-gen1.jpg

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-20171108_104120.jpg

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-20171108_104144.jpg

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-20171108_104019_001.jpg

    Elevated chainstay bike history questions.-20171108_104046_001.jpg
    [SIGPIC]http://www.geckocycles.com[/SIGPIC]

    There is but one rule in life. "First one to the finish line wins!"
    VVA

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12