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  1. #76
    Torque me. Make me spin!
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    Soak the shifters in gasoline for 24 hours

    Quote Originally Posted by cegrover
    I picked this one up from Ebay and the photos below are just "before" shots from the auction. I wasn't sure what I wanted to do with it, as these are full-XT bikes and the Mag 21 is a bonus item.

    I spent part of a rainy day last Saturday getting it fixed and cleaned up and it turns out it was in really good shape under the dirt - few marks on the paint and no dings. The fork aired up nicely and works well. I just need to keep WD40ing the left shifter to see if I can get it to ratchet again. It has the typical push-push Rapidfire problem of wanting to stay in the small ring and not 'catch' on the middle or big.

    "After" shots will come soon...

    Soak the shifters in gasoline for 24 hours.


    New Solution to Old Shifter Problems

    OK, the solution may not be new, but it’s new to me.

    The Old Shifter Problem
    I’ve worked on three olds bikes lately, all more than 10 years old and likely underutilized. They all had the same index-shifter problem. They would shift from the smallest rear cog to the first few larger cogs, but then the shifter failed to catch and pull the shift cable any further. Thus, the lowest 3 to 5 gears were not engaging. Front index-shifting had similar problems, not all three rings were available.

    Background
    Index shifters are similar to old Swiss watches. To function properly, they utilize a series of springs, levers, gears, ratchets, pulleys, and other mechanisms.

    The Investigation
    Upon inspection of the shifters, I notice substantial old dry stiff decaying grease within the shifting mechanisms- springs, levers, gears, ratchets, pulleys, etc. The dry stiff grease prevented the spring from pulling the ratchet back into the gear teeth of the shifter mechanism. Thus the shift lever had nothing to pull.

    The New Solution
    1. Take the covers off of the shifter. This step maybe optional but I always take the covers off.
    2. Remove the shifters from the handle bar. I just leave the shift cables on.
    3. Soak both the front and rear shifters in your favorite solvent. I use gasoline in a coffee can, its cheap, available, and an excellent solvent. I like to let it sit overnight but 2-4 hours seems to work.
    4. Use a toothbrush to dislodge any stubborn grease. Then rinse the shifters in clean solvent.
    5. Let the solvent dry.
    6. Lube the shifting mechanism with a very light weight lube. I use ProLink chain lube.
    7. Test the shifters to ensure that the ratchet catches all available gears. If not, work the ratchet back and forth so that it moves freely. If it’s still not working, try more cleaning and lubing.
    8. Installing new cables is likely optional.
    9. Reassemble the shifters and go ride.

    Caveat
    This procedure is NOT for the faint of heart. Index shifters are extremely delicate. Permanent unrepairable shifter damage may occur during the procedure.

  2. #77
    John Galt
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    Sounds like a good procedure if a quick shot of WD40 (or other) doesn't work. Luckily, mine was unstuck with just a few shots through the cable 'hatch', working the shifter some and letting it sit overnight.

  3. #78
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    Axis Pro

    I bought a old axis pro secondhand years ago,not sure of the year (ideas?)its black with purple splatt with silver graphics,lx groupset,campagalno aerox? rims ,threaded fork(original) ,v brakes,zoom stem etc.Still works well,i am not sure whether to completely restore it,the paint is good condition and i think its 95% original,just one odd crankarm and zoom stem cap missing.The rim walls are worn can they be machined flat? or do i fit new wheels ,better brakes and possibly suspension forks(any ideas what?)and put old bits to one side.Weighed the bike the another day at 25 lb ish.Pics to follow.Cheers Andy

  4. #79
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    My friend has 92 DB Axis looking for a good home!

  5. #80
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    Hi,

    I have this 1997 DBR axis R:







    Actually, my bike don't have this carbon bottlecage, this stem, these cables/casings, this front derailleur and this rear derailleur. Coming soon, more pics.

    Bye

  6. #81
    mtbr member
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    Here's mine!

    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  7. #82
    John Galt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laughman
    Hi,

    I have this 1997 DBR axis R:

    Actually, my bike don't have this carbon bottlecage, this stem, these cables/casings, this front derailleur and this rear derailleur. Coming soon, more pics.

    Bye
    That looks like a nice one - I don't think we got that model in the US, as I'm guessing it's a 1997 or 1998 model, based on the DBR logo. The last TT Lite US model I know of was the '97 Apex SE.

  8. #83
    JAZ
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    My de-stickered 1991 or 1992 Ascent Limited Edition >










    Has quite a few non original parts, as it was a bit of a trickle down bike that I'd put parts on that I had no other use for when I upgraded other bikes.
    I gave it to my father years ago, I still enjoy riding it now & again as he's not up to riding any more.

    I serviced an earlier version of this bike at work today, it was red & had a U brake under the chainstays as well as crazy Bio Pace rings. Apart from everything being a bit rusty the paint was almost as new & after cleaning all the parts & replacing the cables it ran really nice.

  9. #84
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    Re-done

    To any Ascent enthusiast.

    Here's my 94 frame. Purchased in Seattle,1995.

    16 years of companionship, upgrades, fixes and jury rigging it now has Black oxide gun-bluing woth clear powder coat over. Did'nt turn out as nice as I might have liked but good enough for another 16 years.

    Putting together now. Yeah, I know, not original, but....

  10. #85
    mtbr member
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    It must be invisible!
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  11. #86
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    Diamondback Ascent

    Sorry, My pics are too big (or something) I'm trying again

    I'm trying to get on this.

    I just had my early ninety's Diamondback ascent gun-blued and powdered coated. It's in the assembly process with new shocks and other gear.

    I've had it for too long and had too many good times on it to say good bye.

    I want to find out what year it actually is. It's a 1 1/8 in steer tube, I still have the original zoom sport threaded headset. It was originally blue with a way pattern.

    Raleigh no longer has records.

    serial # I3A4671. Appreciate any info and keep in touch.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Diamond Back thread?-ascent1jpg.jpg  


  12. #87
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    Wavy Pattern, Sticky Keyed computer!

  13. #88
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    Replay

    New to this site and my pics were too large.

    Too bad some things get taken for granted when putting in the web buttons. It's up now, thanks for getting back.

  14. #89
    Relax. I'm a pro.
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    My first "real" mountainbike was a bright orange 1991 Diamondback Ascent. I rode the sh!t out of that bike for five years. I headset is now either loose or ovalized. Not sure.

  15. #90
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    I just came across this thread and am glad to see it! I've had a whole bunch
    of bikes over the years, but never more than three at a time. Mostly it was one brand new bike per year. Santa Cruzes, Treks, Fishers, GT, Giant, Cove, hardtail, full suspension, etc.

    After all that, I bought a 1995 Diamond Back Apex frame two years ago while working at the bike shop. Some girl brought it in for an overhaul, and another bike tech told her it would cost over $100, so the girl cringed and decided it would be wiser to buy a new Fisher from us instead, and she gave him the bike for free!!! It was exactly my size,(not his), and so I begged him to sell just the frame to me for $50. He did, and I repainted it and built it up with a bunch of nice, newer parts. It is truely a really sweat bike right now!

    Anyway, the point I'm trying to bring out here is that after all those other bikes, I wind up with this '95 Diamond Back and honestly could'nt be happier, unless maybe if it were a custom Soulcraft or Sycup or something. It's the first DB I've owned and now all of a sudden I'm a DB lover! I don't really like their newer stuff though, but that goes for most other companies as well. This one's a keeper and I'm not parting with it.

    Long live those old Diamond Backs!!!
    PoisonDogFart

  16. #91
    Relax. I'm a pro.
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    I hate to be a party pooper, but I don't think my old Diamond Back had a nice ride. Sure, it was better than the department store crap that I played around on prior, but it was a low-end bike that handled accordingly. I sure had some good times on that thing, though. Maybe someday I'll rebuild it.

  17. #92
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    I got my DB by accident too.

    I was working in downtown Seattle. And parking spaces there,like beautiful women were always taken. I usd to park on capitol hill and ride into work. One day, I I accidentally left my 'Torpedo' (A massed produced mountain bike I purchased in Munich Germany while living there, to replace my stolen huffy) out on Roy street and needed a way to pedal in and stopped into Play it Again sports" and picked up a used Diamond Back Ascent. It was 100% superior to the German Artificially flavored bike and I started to test my limits on the "San Francisco-esque" hills of Seattle/Tacoma, getting myself into pretty good shape.

    By the time I returned to Southern California (For work) I couldn't find nearby streets that would even make me sweat, so it was time to go mountain. I fell in Love the Fireroads and trails of OC and jury rigged that DB all the way. What can I say? I went through the 'Gucci" trip where I had to have the best, the lightest and the newest and finally settled into a comfortable medium. Anything I've done to that loyal, chromoly frame has been absolutely no waste and she has been an absolute pleasure!

  18. #93
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    Thread Boote'

    Ran across this which was in an old ad back in the day.
    Name:  Image.jpg
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Size:  39.0 KB
    The future is not google-able. William Gibson

  19. #94
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    Curb Your Enthusiam

    Diamond back mtn bike spotted in Seinfeld's apartment. No longer a Klein collecting dust.
    Check out the last 2 episodes if interested.
    Not sure on the model.

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by MABman
    Ran across this which was in an old ad back in the day.
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    This lady is a "10"! I'm in love!
    PoisonDogFart

  21. #96
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    Visible,

    Though blurry. Its done and it works great!
    94-95 Diamondback chromoly frame. Gun blued and powdercoated, and retro fitted.

    Looking forward to another decade plus!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Diamond Back thread?-diamond-back-ascent1.jpg  


  22. #97
    Sneaker man
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    whey hey, happy christmas to me... my 1st mtb has returned...



    little bit worse for wear, been sitting in a shed for who knows how long... great bike... now if i could only find the T-bone stem and get ride of the flex stem...

  23. #98
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    Upgrading are fine.

    Going Vintage is alright too, But I really ride mine. And as an school hardtailer, the Frame is the thing. Double butted chromoly back when frames were the major component and DB's were still a great bike. I wish somebody would take them away from Raleigh and retro fit some pride in the production again.

  24. #99
    Sneaker man
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    yeah, back in the day... well for me 1992-1995, they were a bit of a good thing, not exactly drool material, but very good... these days they seem like junk... but that seems to happen a lot these days...

  25. #100
    Sneaker man
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    i know its not even close to retro, but:
    30th aniversary team

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