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  1. #1
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    Crosstrac Sonoma

    Wow ! did any of you see the Crosstrac that just sold for $240.00 on Ebay? Sonoma fork, XT components, Synergy wheels? A nice buy for somebody on a little known but well built bike.
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    Last edited by stan4bikes; 10-12-2007 at 12:29 AM.
    "I won't sell these for a penny less than $60.00. I'd rather put 'em back on the shelf and keep 'em! "

  2. #2
    mountaingoatcycles.com
    Reputation: First Flight's Avatar
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    If we didn't already have one, I probably would have bid on it. I think the mixed era parts probably hurt the value?

  3. #3
    HIYAH
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    Whats the story on these...

    Never seen one. Seat mast is interesting for sure. Anyone gonna share?
    TTHHHHHHHHHPPPPPPPPPTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT

  4. #4
    No good in rock gardens..
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    That one has a real shock thank goodness, not that rubber football bladder, LOL.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  5. #5
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    I used to deal them, the gas bag shock wasn't that bad but the use of presta valves for the shock and fork was annoying. The high forward pivot really would benefit from a modern Fifth Element or Fox Float Propedal shock though.
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  6. #6
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    I always wondered how those forks rode, and what was going on inside... How would they stack up against, for example, an almost-contemporary 1996 Z1?
    undefined Absolutely must have: Black Machine Tech Zeroflex brake levers (the ones with the rotating leverage adjuster)

  7. #7
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    They stacked up better. They were Air/Oil forks with 4 inches of travel and a single air-valve filled both fork legs (so you never had imbalanced pressure between each leg).
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  8. #8
    No known cure
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    The only one I ever saw on the trail had a solid, polished aluminum strut in place of the rear shock.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  9. #9
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    Hey Stan, don't you have one of those in your collection?

  10. #10
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    as a matter of fact...

    Quote Originally Posted by muddybuddy
    Hey Stan, don't you have one of those in your collection?
    yes I do, also not period correct but still lot's of fun and a real attention getter.
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    "I won't sell these for a penny less than $60.00. I'd rather put 'em back on the shelf and keep 'em! "

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by uphiller
    I always wondered how those forks rode, and what was going on inside... How would they stack up against, for example, an almost-contemporary 1996 Z1?

    I had one of those on my DH bikes in 1994 and it was the best thing going (IMO), but still needed help. It was in dire need of a negative spring. Typical air spring with the high initial load required to break into the travel. The fork in that ebay auction is on backward if I recall correctly. The brakes were meant to be run like a C-dale Force 40 and behind the fork. I remember one time I somehow deflated the fork in the middle of a ride and had to finish up the ride fully bottomed out. Thats one of the downfalls of having both legs run off of one valve.

    I would have much rather ridden a Z1, but those werent out yet. I do remember seeing one of those crazy Z1 Bombers for the first time at Mammoth and was blown away by the great action. Heavy though.

  12. #12
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    I thought something looked wrong...

    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    The fork in that ebay auction is on backward if I recall correctly. The brakes were meant to be run like a C-dale Force 40 and behind the fork. .
    The crown is right but the sliders (?) are backwards. It looks like it could run either way though, I don't see any offset in the dropouts.

    (picture from FirstFlights website)
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    "I won't sell these for a penny less than $60.00. I'd rather put 'em back on the shelf and keep 'em! "

  13. #13
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    Yep.

    Quote Originally Posted by stan4bikes
    The crown is right but the sliders (?) are backwards. It looks like it could run either way though, I don't see any offset in the dropouts.

    (picture from FirstFlights website)

    Yeah, it doesnt look like it matters as far as offset goes.

    And a 4" travel, air-sprung FS bike in 1994 was ahead of its time I would say. Compared to a Mag21, this fork was really different. Never had a chance to ride the frame, though.

  14. #14
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    Yeah, I saw it...

    Well, here it is after a rebuild and some mussing with the forks. I was surprised to have it all come together at 25.4lbs. A wheel swap would easily drop a pound, but it feels reasonable where it's at for the time being.
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  15. #15
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    Out of curiousity since you used V-brake levers why you didn't use a rear V-brake also ?!?
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  16. #16
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    It's a matter of aesthetics really: braze-ons that go left unused feel awkward to me somehow. Typically if a frame has a braze-on rear cantilever brake cable stop I'll fit a canti in the rear and do my best to find a matching V-brake for the front. The V up front tends to provide more than enough stopping power and I don't feel like I've extraneous appendages on the frame.

  17. #17
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    So why not replace the missing powercam for the front brace and run a second cantilever then?
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  18. #18
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    I like it, it looks great and I think your brake explanation makes good sense. Work with watcha got That fork looks awesome, a nice clean and functional appearance.
    "I won't sell these for a penny less than $60.00. I'd rather put 'em back on the shelf and keep 'em! "

  19. #19
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    Any reason why most forks have the bridge in the front and not the rear?
    Looking for: Really nice set of black M730 cranks

  20. #20
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    You mean most as in other than Pace and Manitou? Yeah its cause you don't have to do any sort of careful engineering to prevent the brace whacking the downtube. As to why some manufacturers do use reverse arches its because it makes for a stiffer fork using the same mass of brace.
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  21. #21
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    Sonoma's never die...

    Awesome! Ressurecting this thread with my Sonoma. I bought it new in '94, and it is STILL my primary XC rig, having been rebuilt on several occasions. The latest rebuild saw the Crosstrac front fork replaced with a little more reliable Rock Shox Recon 351. I got sick of having to replace the presta valve on the equalizing tubes when it got pinched and snapped during big hits, flattening the front end to zero suspension and horrific geometry for an attempted recovery from a large hit. I also custom fabbed a rear disc brake mount and updated wheels to Mavic Crossrides. 1 1/4" No threadset (!) was reduced to 1 1/8" Chris King, and stem/handlebars were replaced. I still run the original Kooka crankset I built it with originally in 94', as well as the Fox rear shock, which has been rebuilt a few times over the past 16 years.


    These bikes are awesome to ride, though not the most efficient pedaling machines. They get looks from anyone who could consider themself a bike geek, and even more looks from anyone not familiar with them. You'd think you were riding a spaceship

    I still log hundreds of miles every season, and last year, rode the old beast from Fruita, CO to Moab, UT via The Kokopelli trail...I was the ONLY rig out of seven (less ONE flat tire) to not have a single mechanical issue.


  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by margo
    Awesome! Ressurecting this thread with my Sonoma. I bought it new in '94, and it is STILL my primary XC rig, having been rebuilt on several occasions. The latest rebuild saw the Crosstrac front fork replaced with a little more reliable Rock Shox Recon 351. I got sick of having to replace the presta valve on the equalizing tubes when it got pinched and snapped during big hits, flattening the front end to zero suspension and horrific geometry for an attempted recovery from a large hit. I also custom fabbed a rear disc brake mount and updated wheels to Mavic Crossrides. 1 1/4" No threadset (!) was reduced to 1 1/8" Chris King, and stem/handlebars were replaced. I still run the original Kooka crankset I built it with originally in 94', as well as the Fox rear shock, which has been rebuilt a few times over the past 16 years.


    These bikes are awesome to ride, though not the most efficient pedaling machines. They get looks from anyone who could consider themself a bike geek, and even more looks from anyone not familiar with them. You'd think you were riding a spaceship

    I still log hundreds of miles every season, and last year, rode the old beast from Fruita, CO to Moab, UT via The Kokopelli trail...I was the ONLY rig out of seven (less ONE flat tire) to not have a single mechanical issue.


    great post. wouldn't mind seeing more pics. cool that it's still running and being ridden after all those years. 1994 was not a time when FS bikes were very refined, but this one was ahead of its time I think.

  23. #23
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    16 years and counting from an FS bike is impressive. Does that rear pivot have any play in it?
    Seems like it would benefit from a stable platform shock if it is a bad pedaler.
    undefined Absolutely must have: Black Machine Tech Zeroflex brake levers (the ones with the rotating leverage adjuster)

  24. #24
    IVMTB & VMBEFG Illuminati
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    I have one and was surprised at how well it rode in relation to how horrible my early Mountain Cycle San Andreas rode. I quite enjoy riding my Crosstrac.


  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by uphiller
    16 years and counting from an FS bike is impressive. Does that rear pivot have any play in it?
    Seems like it would benefit from a stable platform shock if it is a bad pedaler.
    The pivot has no play at all. The only issue I ever had with linkage, was a stripped bolt on seat mast. Drilled out and threw a heli-coil in about 6 years ago and no problems since. Really is an impressively engineered and built bike. Seated climbing up technical stuff gets some pedal-suck, but when out of the saddle, it almost locks out to hardtail status. And the downhills are extremely fun.

    Here are the finished pics just after the latest build two years ago.



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