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  1. #1
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    Bridgestone MB-1 fork replacement help

    Hi folks, this is my first post here. I've been lurking and learning for sometime, and I figured I'd sign up so I can join some of these great conversations. I mostly ride in San Francisco, although I spend time in Santa Cruz and Los Angeles as well (work travel). I've spent the last 6 years or so on a Miyata 610, though I have a Santa Cruz Blur that I use specifically in SC (mostly at Pogonip up by UCSC). Anyway, my beloved 610 was stolen from me in SF and I'm trying to find a good commuter that can replicate the slack geo and just simple enjoyment I experienced with such a classic. I've been looking at the Bridgestone MB-1 and there is one for sale near me in almost stock condition, except for the fork which has been swapped out for suspension. I've done some research on this, but I have come to no definite conclusion as to wether or not I can find a replacement fork. It doesn't seem like Ritchey makes steel forks anymore, so....am I out of luck? Thanks for your help!

    -John

  2. #2
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    You can get a used one for pretty cheap. Keep an eye out on ebay for them or go to a swap. I had a couple of mb-1s and they are so much fun to ride. Great choice!

    Welcome to the forum.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    You can get a used one for pretty cheap. Keep an eye out on ebay for them or go to a swap. I had a couple of mb-1s and they are so much fun to ride. Great choice!

    Welcome to the forum.
    Thank you! Sounds like I can find one if I just keep an eye out. I was hoping that someone could make one exactly like it (maybe??) but I will start looking at eBay, etc. Is the MB-1 good for commuting? I was planning on putting some slicks on it and cruising around town. Basically, I've just never been a fan of tiny tires. At my age (41) I want to be able to lean back when I ride, blast over bumps and rocks in the street like they aren't even there, etc. I see these kids flying around town on super tight geo bikes with 23's and I can only imagine what would happen if they hit a pothole or something.

  4. #4
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    I did end up using mine as a city errand bike but ran out of space. It was a great bike on and off the road and it's definitely fun to ride.

    Also, if you're in a hurry to get it up and running, there are lots of other 1" rigid forks you could use. I've seen used 1" unicrowns in parts bins all over town. Forgot what the AC measurement was. Maybe Fred or somebody can remember off the top of their heads?

    Maybe lock it up a little better than your Trek though.

  5. #5
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    What year MB-1 are you looking at? I wouldn't call some of them "slack." I have a '93 (second to last year they were made), and its actually quite twitchey. Relatively steep angles & short wheelbase by most standards. Might not necessarily be a "bad" commuter, but it doesn't sound like what you're describing that you want. If you know what year it is, some others here might have more specific impressions. Also, I'd suggest getting a bigger size than you would have ridden back when they were new, for use as a true mountain bike. Maybe 1 1/2" standover clearance? Especially for a commuter, it'll allow higher handlebars which will make it are much more comfortable.
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

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    Check with the Sheldon Brown Bridgestone catalogue spec pages, but I think for several years (1991 for sure) the MB1, MB2, and MB3 used the same fork.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamkeith View Post
    What year MB-1 are you looking at? I wouldn't call some of them "slack." I have a '93 (second to last year they were made), and its actually quite twitchey. Relatively steep angles & short wheelbase by most standards. Might not necessarily be a "bad" commuter, but it doesn't sound like what you're describing that you want. If you know what year it is, some others here might have more specific impressions. Also, I'd suggest getting a bigger size than you would have ridden back when they were new, for use as a true mountain bike. Maybe 1 1/2" standover clearance? Especially for a commuter, it'll allow higher handlebars which will make it are much more comfortable.
    It looks to be an '89. My plan was to set it up with a shorter stem and some nitto or velo orange sweep back bars. Is this not a good plan for this bike?

  8. #8
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    Attachment 800281
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. John View Post
    It looks to be an '89. My plan was to set it up with a shorter stem and some nitto or velo orange sweep back bars. Is this not a good plan for this bike?
    If it helps: In '89, the MB-1 and MB-2 both used the same Koski fork. The link is from the '89 catalogue spec page.

    Bridgestone Bicycle Catalogue 1989-23

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    Oh wow. I just assumed it was a Ritchey Logic. Never heard of Koski before. Do they still make forks?

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    The stock Logic forks for the MB-1s were/are phenomenal. And you should be able to track one down. It was years ago, but I picked up some frame & forks from Pedal Revolution since you are in SF, so you may find a Logic fork somewhere near. These were/are butted wonders. I picked one up the other day from a recyclery, not sure it is one that is a Prestige. Get an original, not to replicate.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by grandsalmon View Post
    The stock Logic forks for the MB-1s were/are phenomenal. And you should be able to track one down. It was years ago, but I picked up some frame & forks from Pedal Revolution since you are in SF, so you may find a Logic fork somewhere near. These were/are butted wonders. I picked one up the other day from a recyclery, not sure it is one that is a Prestige. Get an original, not to replicate.
    Roger that. Thanks for the great info on this thread everyone. Looking forward to learning and (hopefully) contributing around here.

  12. #12
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    Koski forks like the original on that '89 will be tough to find, but a Ritchey like what came on the '90 would work and may be easier to find. Aside from the Tomac signature Mongoose of the same era, the MB-1 had some of the steepest geometry of the day. As mentioned above, these bikes are pretty twitchy or "nimble.". You may be better off looking for something a bit older to find the slack geometry you seek.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    Koski forks like the original on that '89 will be tough to find, but a Ritchey like what came on the '90 would work and may be easier to find. Aside from the Tomac signature Mongoose of the same era, the MB-1 had some of the steepest geometry of the day. As mentioned above, these bikes are pretty twitchy or "nimble.". You may be better off looking for something a bit older to find the slack geometry you seek.
    Interesting. Can you think of any examples? Maybe a Stumpjumper?

  14. #14
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    Most anything built before '88 will likely have a slacker geometry than those built in the following years.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by grandsalmon View Post
    The stock Logic forks for the MB-1s were/are phenomenal. And you should be able to track one down. It was years ago, but I picked up some frame & forks from Pedal Revolution since you are in SF, so you may find a Logic fork somewhere near. These were/are butted wonders. I picked one up the other day from a recyclery, not sure it is one that is a Prestige. Get an original, not to replicate.
    I didn't know there were any Logic forks made of Prestige tubing. Were they on the Zips? Thanks.
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    Edit: I should have done a google search before posting. I see the reference now.

    Bridgestone MB-1 fork replacement help-screen-shot-2013-05-19-9.02.18-am.jpg

  16. #16
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    Well, I finally rode the '89 today. It was pretty clean and stock, with the exception of the fork (minor details) which was swapped out for some Specialized suspension forks. It seemed to fit me perfectly, but I was surprised at how long the bike felt. The stock stem seemed enormous to me. Anyway, the MB-1 was really cool but it seemed pretty clunky and slow on the road (well, relative to my previous touring bike). My plan was to put a Nitto stem and some flat or upright bars on it for commuting purposes. I was also going to do some leisure riding through Golden Gate Park to the beach, etc. I didn't buy it yet as I am still fairly undecided. The fork situation is kind of bumming me out. But I do have a question: if I swapped the stock mb tires for slicks/Schwalbe's, etc., would it make the bike faster? I can get this thing for $250, but I just can't make up my mind. Thanks for your input!

  17. #17
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    1.5 slicks and a ridged fork will transform it into a quick, agile and durable city bike. You'll be amazed at the difference. The bars are a great idea for the intended purpose and 250 ain't a bad price.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    1.5 slicks and a ridged fork will transform it into a quick, agile and durable city bike. You'll be amazed at the difference. The bars are a great idea for the intended purpose and 250 ain't a bad price.
    That's a good endorsement. But, where do I get a rigid fork?

  19. #19
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    Ebay, Craigs list, bike shops, swap meets ect.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    1.5 slicks and a ridged fork will transform it into a quick, agile and durable city bike. You'll be amazed at the difference. The bars are a great idea for the intended purpose and 250 ain't a bad price.
    This was my set-up on my MB-1, in San Francisco of all places. I was not want for another kind/type of bike. 1.5s strike such a nice balance and I had gone in both size directions.
    $250 is a super price if it looks good, tubes are sound and frame straight. Determine the frame size; headtube height to help in sourcing a matching fork.

  21. #21
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    Ok. Great stuff everyone, thank you for the help. I'll keep you posted.

  22. #22
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    I've had good luck with newly made Tange brand non-suspension corrected 1" threaded forks on my older mountain bikes. It's been a couple of years since I bought one, so i don't know about availability, but your LBS should be able to order one if they are available.

  23. #23
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    I have a black Bianchi fork off a grizzly from around 89. Steer tube is 5-1/2" Welcome to it.

  24. #24
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    Don't pass up the MB-1!

    Hello-

    Sorry to hear about your other bike... replacing a beloved bike that was stolen lacks the usual joy of a bike search!

    I highly suggest that you snag the MB-1 and sort out a fork later, you will not be disappointed! I was in the same situation with my 1992 MB-1, the previous owner had installed a suspension fork and did not save the stock rigid fork. Thankfully I was able to find a Ritchey Logic fork for sale locally on Craigslist. Not long after I happened onto the Ritchey high rise stem and at that point I decided to rebuild the bike with a dirt drop set up using an On One Midge handlebar. I swapped all the components over to Suntour XC Pro and it has been my favorite bike ever since! I'm not really one for trophy bikes, I suppose I have a couple of unmolested VRC gems, but even those get taken to the trail a few times per year. The MB-1 you happened onto sounds like it will make an ideal rider and I promise that it will give you years of enjoyment... now go get it before someone else does!

    Keep us posted, thanks!

    -D-
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bridgestone MB-1 fork replacement help-mb-1dirtdrop1.jpg  

    Bridgestone MB-1 fork replacement help-mb-1dirtdrop2.jpg  

    Bridgestone MB-1 fork replacement help-mb-1dirtdrop3.jpg  

    Bridgestone MB-1 fork replacement help-mb-1dirtdrop4.jpg  

    Last edited by neo_pop_71; 06-03-2013 at 07:28 AM.

  25. #25
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    You don't mind the shifters being so far away from your hands?

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