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  1. #1
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    New question here. Bridgestone MB-1 - Best year made?

    I'm looking for a 90's MB-1 and would like to know if any year stood out over the others as far as frame or component quality? I missed what I thought was a deal last night on a MB-1 but held back because it had a manitou shock on it that I didn't think was stock. Anyway, any ideas?

  2. #2
    underachiever
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    I like the 1992 or 1993 MB-1, though I think it's more a personal preference. I also like the 1987 model with the drop bars, though.
    Last edited by misterdangerpants; 09-01-2010 at 09:28 AM.

  3. #3
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    87 is by far the coolest with its drop bars, but for me 89 was a favorite as it had the first year 7 speed hyperglide, Koski fork (which was a $200-250 fork) and good quality paint. From what I've seen, from 1990 on the quality of the paint suffered.

    Bridgestone was real cutting edge in the 80s and in the 90s they were retro grouches sticking with flimsy (unlike the Koski) rigid forks, thumb shifters, crappy paint and suspension stems... barf.

  4. #4
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    My favorites:

    #1) I agree with FB on the '89 because of the Koski fork and the 7sp.
    #2) Drop bar '87
    #3) '88 - Cool black XT components
    #4) '90 - Nice ride (paint was prone to scratching, but the flat gunmetal gray was easy to match for touch up.)

    These were the only years I rode / owned, so can not comment on other years.

  5. #5
    Klunker Kev`
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    I own a `90, but I`d really rather have an `85...

  6. #6
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    I found a pic of a '89 MB-1. Nice. I do like the grey/white paint. Didn't know about the fork. Did anything change reguarding the geometry in the later years?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bridgestone MB-1 - Best year made?-img_0272a.jpg  


  7. #7
    Humanoid Lobster
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    Quote Originally Posted by High Gear
    I found a pic of a '89 MB-1. Nice. I do like the grey/white paint.
    I've always loved this paint scheme. If you say to me "close your eyes and picture a Bridgestone MTB" this is what comes into my mind.

    A good friend of mine had one of these '89's, brings back lots of memories of great rides.
    Don't call it a gooseneck.

  8. #8
    slow
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    Quote Originally Posted by High Gear
    Did anything change regarding the geometry in the later years?
    Not sure, but the info should be in the catalogs. You can check the specs in the catalogs at Sheldon Brown's site:
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bridgest...tml#catalogues

  9. #9
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    Last edited by tductape; 09-01-2010 at 12:33 PM.
    Seek: Koski Trailmaster. Breezer Series 2 or 3. Cunningham Racer.

  10. #10
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    Oh man, I totally agree with FB. I have a 91 which I love but I would trade it for a 89 in a heartbeat.

  11. #11
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    I thought you had every year of every Bridgestone?



    Also agree on '89
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    87 is by far the coolest with its drop bars, but for me 89 was a favorite as it had the first year 7 speed hyperglide, Koski fork (which was a $200-250 fork) and good quality paint. From what I've seen, from 1990 on the quality of the paint suffered.

    Bridgestone was real cutting edge in the 80s and in the 90s they were retro grouches sticking with flimsy (unlike the Koski) rigid forks, thumb shifters, crappy paint and suspension stems... barf.

    Nah, come on.... you know you really want an '88.
    Wanted:

    Potts, Potts, Potts

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooderdude
    Nah, come on.... you know you really want an '88.

    haha. I do. I first had an 88, raced it and rode it tons, and then wanted hyperglide since it shifted so nice and than saw the Koski fork and the 7 speed on the 89s and quickly decided to sell the 88 and get the latest and greatest. The 88 with the black cranks like sgltrack noted were really cool. Lots of memories with that bike. Yours is so clean - let me know when you're ready to sell.
    Last edited by Fillet-brazed; 09-01-2010 at 04:10 PM.

  14. #14
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    All of them where nice. My favorites:

    1987 - drop bar
    1989 - Koski fork
    1993-1994 - super cool fork crown styled after the early Ritchey crown
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne


    Also agree on '89
    I've been paring down production bikes. :P

  16. #16
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    93 For Me

    Quote Originally Posted by High Gear
    I'm looking for a 90's MB-1 and would like to know if any year stood out over the others as far as frame or component quality? I missed what I thought was a deal last night on a MB-1 but held back because it had a manitou shock on it that I didn't think was stock. Anyway, any ideas?
    I have had some good times on my 93, but it's the only MB-1 I've owned so can't really say which year was the best,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2 Wheels Good

  17. #17
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    I like 1993-4 for the bi-plane fork crown, more modern brake levers vs older years, and still had thumbies.
    Too many bikes, not enough time.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak
    Not sure, but the info should be in the catalogs. You can check the specs in the catalogs at Sheldon Brown's site:
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bridgest...tml#catalogues
    Thanks! I'll check them out.

  19. #19
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    Do you guys think there is any major disadvantage in picking an older bike like the MB-1 over anything thats out there these days? My big thing is that I feel a steel frame and thumb shifters perfected the MTB.

  20. #20
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    The obvious one is the trail.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by High Gear
    Do you guys think there is any major disadvantage in picking an older bike like the MB-1 over anything thats out there these days? My big thing is that I feel a steel frame and thumb shifters perfected the MTB.
    Tons of disadvantages. I have a 1992 MB-5 that I love to ride, but I wouldn't give up my full suspension bike as a primary mtn bike. I can ride more of the trail and do it faster on my "modern" disc equipped bike, which is now 10 years old. I do like thumbies a lot, and luckily there are plenty of options for 8, 9, and 10 speed thumbies. IRD and Paul make products for this. There are also a plethora of fine steel bikes made today that can fit modern suspension forks, disc brakes, larger tires, etc. These are all good things.
    Too many bikes, not enough time.

  22. #22
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Well, quite honestly, MB-5s are not that great. You're comparing apples to oranges.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by High Gear
    Do you guys think there is any major disadvantage in picking an older bike like the MB-1 over anything thats out there these days? My big thing is that I feel a steel frame and thumb shifters perfected the MTB.
    It depends on what you're comparing it to and where you ride. If you are looking at a modern rigid mountain bike to ride, the MB will compare very favorably. However if you're comparing it to a full-suspension bike, there's no comparison - a MB-1 is dated. What do you plan on riding? For commuting, gravel roads, and most non-technical trails, a rigid bike works great. And if you're a good rider, many technical trails are fun on a rigid bike. However if you're looking at bikes to ride on a down-hill mountain bike course, a rigid bike is likely not the best choice.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux
    It depends on what you're comparing it to and where you ride. If you are looking at a modern rigid mountain bike to ride, the MB will compare very favorably. However if you're comparing it to a full-suspension bike, there's no comparison - a MB-1 is dated. What do you plan on riding? For commuting, gravel roads, and most non-technical trails, a rigid bike works great. And if you're a good rider, many technical trails are fun on a rigid bike. However if you're looking at bikes to ride on a down-hill mountain bike course, a rigid bike is likely not the best choice.
    This is going to be for gravel bike trail, around the town scoots and maybe some single track here in Connecticut. Not to mention towing the Burley.

  25. #25
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    you'll be fine!

  26. #26
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike
    you'll be fine!

    Cool. I thought so. Plus I'll be riding retro. Maybe more bike than I need, but I like the fact that It will perform well off road too.

  27. #27
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    I used to have an MB-0 (zip) from that era. It was a very nice lightweight steel bike, but perhaps too light because I eventually cracked a chainstay and I weighed less than 140 lbs back then.

    Looked like this;
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bridgestone MB-1 - Best year made?-mb-0.jpg  


  28. #28
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    kinda partial to my 94'

    Panel paintjob is a little different. While I ride my 09' Santa Cruz LT2 for most technical and epic rides I spend more time in the saddle of my Stoner' to include single track.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bridgestone MB-1 - Best year made?-img_0334.jpg  


  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike
    Well, quite honestly, MB-5s are not that great. You're comparing apples to oranges.
    My MB-5 has the same frame geometry as the MB-1 of the same model year. The only difference is weight and component spec. Quite frankly, most of this boils down to weight, because there isn't much performance difference b/w the mid level and upper groupsets of this vintage. The riding experience b/w MB-1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 are all quite translatable. The geometry on all of them is a treat, and it's a testament to Bridgestone that they kept this geometry across the model line and produced such fine riding entry and mid level bikes.
    Too many bikes, not enough time.

  30. #30
    illuminaughty
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    "94 for me

    of course it's the only one I've ridden besides my MB2.....I think what a person has ridden is the deciding factor. Try one out, if you like it , get it...if not move on to the next one. You'll find one thats right.

    ( I think the fork on the '94 is from a '93)
    Attached Images Attached Images

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by da'HOOV
    of course it's the only one I've ridden besides my MB2.....I think what a person has ridden is the deciding factor. Try one out, if you like it , get it...if not move on to the next one. You'll find one thats right.
    awesome contribution!

  32. #32
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    Just another production mountain bike from Japan...Most of the rest were just as nice. Who did Grant actually source the frames from for the MB-Zips, 1's and 2's? National? Toyo?
    Needed: 26.8mm XTR seatpost, blue GT/Grundig Jersey.

  33. #33
    illuminaughty
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    awesome contribution!
    thanx FB, for another tired old comment....and BTW.....did you see that gorgeous stem on BP's bike?
    Last edited by da'HOOV; 09-01-2010 at 08:40 PM.

  34. #34
    Stokeless Asshat
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    Quote Originally Posted by gm1230126
    Just another production mountain bike from Japan...Most of the rest were just as nice. Who did Grant actually source the frames from for the MB-Zips, 1's and 2's? National? Toyo?
    I'd put my money on Toyo. He has always said he has a long history with them. Who has National built for?
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  35. #35
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    [QUOTE=jeffWho has National built for?[/QUOTE] Well, let's see...they are owned by Matsushita Appliance whose brand is Panasonic. They have also built for Schwinn, Raleigh, Centurion, Bridgestone, Nishiki to name a few.
    Needed: 26.8mm XTR seatpost, blue GT/Grundig Jersey.

  36. #36
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    I asked...
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  37. #37
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Lugged = Japan. Tig = Taiwan. But yeah, it's just another production bike that will do the job that the OP wanted it for.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike
    Lugged = Japan. Tig = Taiwan. But yeah, it's just another production bike that will do the job that the OP wanted it for.
    Not just another production bike really. Sure the frame was made overseas, but they (Grant) actually put his own thought into the geometry and went way above the norm in how he chose to spec the bikes. Read the 87 catalog and name another Japanese brand that had anything close to the character and uniqueness Grant's bikes had.
    Last edited by Fillet-brazed; 09-02-2010 at 09:27 AM.

  39. #39
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    ha! Well, I didn't mean to make them seem quite ordinary. Yeah, Grant did a fantastic job with Bridgestone. I think I'll always keep my MB-1...unless I have to start selling stuff for some reason.

    And...zips are nice. They are super light and really fun to ride. Bradbury Manitous also had lots of cracked frames. It happens. :P

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by da'HOOV
    thanx FB, for another tired old comment....and BTW.....did you see that gorgeous stem on BP's bike?

    well, unlike your post where you're just picking the one you happen to have out in the pile in the barn, most of us here are choosing our favorites based on something else. I've owned a 90 and a 94 MB-1 (parts bike purchases) and didn't like either as much as some of the other years for various reasons. I've never had an 87, but I think it's by far the coolest of them all... Just sayin.

    I'm not sure what stem you're talking about.
    Last edited by Fillet-brazed; 09-02-2010 at 09:16 AM.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike
    ha! Well, I didn't mean to make them seem quite ordinary. Yeah, Grant did a fantastic job with Bridgestone. I think I'll always keep my MB-1...unless I have to start selling stuff for some reason.

    And...zips are nice. They are super light and really fun to ride. Bradbury Manitous also had lots of cracked frames. It happens. :P


    Wasn't necessarily directed at you, someone said this earlier in the thread (GM9485345), yours was just closer when I hit respond.
    Last edited by Fillet-brazed; 09-02-2010 at 09:27 AM.

  42. #42
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    Toyo is a small shop and I'd doubt even back then it could handle a really large volume. National, on the other hand could crank them out easily.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  43. #43
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    I'm pretty sure that Bridgestone build their own bicycle frames. Bridgestone USA, which is what most of us are familiar with, was small and produced a relatively small number of frames. However, Bridgestone of Japan (Bridgestone USA's parent) is a huge company that builds many bikes for the Asian market which is by far larger than the US market.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux
    I'm pretty sure that Bridgestone build their own bicycle frames. Bridgestone USA, which is what most of us are familiar with, was small and produced a relatively small number of frames. However, Bridgestone of Japan (Bridgestone USA's parent) is a huge company that builds many bikes for the Asian market which is by far larger than the US market.

    yeah, probably so. They may have used National though, if not in house...

  45. #45
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    Oh, duh!
    Indeed, Bridgestone Japan is huge and still makes plenty of high end bikes for the Japanese market under the Anchor brand.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  46. #46
    defender of bad taste
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    Bridgestone fans in Toronto are probably considering this very question just at the moment, mmmmmmm mustache bars!

    5 is the old new black; 6 is the new new black...

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    Not just another production bike really. Sure the frame was made overseas, but they (Grant) actually put his own thought into the geometry and went way above the norm in how he chose to spec the bikes. Read the 87 catalog and name another Japanese brand that had anything close to the character and uniqueness Grant's bikes had.
    In a world full of shops with vehicles with two wheels ...he, Grant, was trying to be different, unique and set himself apart from the masses. I can think of a number of high end 87 bikes that were just as unique and also production bikes. Regarding the catalogs...Marketing 101, he was just trying to educate his customers enough to make a decision. I really doubt that Grant threw himself into Bridgestone any harder than any of the other product brand managers in the industry at the time.
    Needed: 26.8mm XTR seatpost, blue GT/Grundig Jersey.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by gm1230126
    I can think of a number of high end 87 bikes that were just as unique and also production bikes.
    like......?


    Quote Originally Posted by gm1230126
    Regarding the catalogs...Marketing 101, he was just trying to educate his customers enough to make a decision. I really doubt that Grant threw himself into Bridgestone any harder than any of the other product brand managers in the industry at the time.
    Do you have any examples of brand managers that did things like Grant? I'm not talking about things like adding a third, many might say gratuitous, triangle to a frame either.

  49. #49
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    Marketing 101, that's why Bridgestone's catalogues were the same as all the others....
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  50. #50
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    This is actually the page I was thinking about when I said read the 87 catalog, but it's actually from 88. Left a lasting impression on me as a kid. Pretty cool:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bridgest...ne-1988-10.htm

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    87 is by far the coolest with its drop bars, but for me 89 was a favorite as it had the first year 7 speed hyperglide, Koski fork (which was a $200-250 fork) and good quality paint. From what I've seen, from 1990 on the quality of the paint suffered.

    Bridgestone was real cutting edge in the 80s and in the 90s they were retro grouches sticking with flimsy (unlike the Koski) rigid forks, thumb shifters, crappy paint and suspension stems... barf.
    I have two questions please;

    1. How does the Koski fork effect ride/ handling when compared to the Ritchey Logic fork?

    2.Does the rear stay style that attaches to the side of the seat tube change handling or ride/ stiffness when comparing to the later models with fastback stays.

  52. #52
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    I had an '88 MB-2, blue with black components. ran the crap out of that bike. got a '92 MB-1 that I still have in the shed. rode it a few yrs ago on the 5 boros ride in nyc. with the race wheels that I built it weighed in at 20.5 lbs.

  53. #53
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    Posted by Mr Kelly on RBUK:
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu
    I used to have an MB-0 (zip) from that era. It was a very nice lightweight steel bike, but perhaps too light because I eventually cracked a chainstay and I weighed less than 140 lbs back then.

    Looked like this;
    There is all sorts of everything just wrong about this bike....
    Just a regular guy.

  55. #55
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    There is all sorts of everything just wrong about this bike....
    LOL!

    Well the frame is stock anyways
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  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley
    I have two questions please;

    1. How does the Koski fork effect ride/ handling when compared to the Ritchey Logic fork?

    2.Does the rear stay style that attaches to the side of the seat tube change handling or ride/ stiffness when comparing to the later models with fastback stays.

    The standard '80s fork starts off at 1" OD (outside diameter) at the crown and tapers down to a spindly 1/2" OD. The offset comes at the bottom 4-5" or so of the fork blade. The Koski blade goes from 1" to 3/4" (50% larger) with a partially enclosed, plug-in dropout to further stiffen things up. The offset on the Koski also comes from a much larger radius that starts closer to the top of the fork near the crown. The Logic fork is stiffer than your standard fork with a 5/8" blade at the dropout and also has a larger radius bend almost like the Koski. I should also mention that the Koski also came in a straight bladed version.

    As for the ride of these, for casual, non-aggressive riding the standard forks might have a more supple feel. For aggressive stuff, the stiffer blades pay off with better "damping", less shutter, and vibration.

    Regarding the stay attachment, I don't think anyone could feasibly tell a difference between the two. Maybe on paper the earlier ones could be a little stiffer laterally since it's a wider attachment point.. Hard to say unless you tested it in a lab I'd guess.

  57. #57
    illuminaughty
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    see post #9....

    duplicate... but it still looks good..

    Quote Originally Posted by yo-Nate-y
    Posted by Mr Kelly on RBUK:

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    The standard '80s fork starts off at 1" OD (outside diameter) at the crown and tapers down to a spindly 1/2" OD. The offset comes at the bottom 4-5" or so of the fork blade. The Koski blade goes from 1" to 3/4" (50% larger) with a partially enclosed, plug-in dropout to further stiffen things up. The offset on the Koski also comes from a much larger radius that starts closer to the top of the fork near the crown. The Logic fork is stiffer than your standard fork with a 5/8" blade at the dropout and also has a larger radius bend almost like the Koski. I should also mention that the Koski also came in a straight bladed version.

    As for the ride of these, for casual, non-aggressive riding the standard forks might have a more supple feel. For aggressive stuff, the stiffer blades pay off with better "damping", less shutter, and vibration.

    Regarding the stay attachment, I don't think anyone could feasibly tell a difference between the two. Maybe on paper the earlier ones could be a little stiffer laterally since it's a wider attachment point.. Hard to say unless you tested it in a lab I'd guess.
    Most important, the Koski forks look better.
    Quote Originally Posted by banks
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by IF52
    Most important, the Koski forks look better.

    that too.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by rallyrcr
    I had an '88 MB-2, blue with black components. ran the crap out of that bike. got a '92 MB-1 that I still have in the shed. rode it a few yrs ago on the 5 boros ride in nyc. with the race wheels that I built it weighed in at 20.5 lbs.
    If it's a 55cm, sell it to me.

  61. #61
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    Bridgestone branded bikes are still made, and they are sick. Not sure if it's just an Asian market thing or what.

    All the US 'Stones broke if ridden much.

    -Schmitty-

  62. #62
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    http://www.anchor-bikes.com/bikes/bike_index.html

    At least a couple years ago they were still doing custom/made to order bikes under the Bridgestone brand name too. All the production stuff goes by "Anchor" these days though.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
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  63. #63
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    Bridgestone never went away. It was "Bridgestone USA" that went out of business. Grant Peterson is strongly associated with the US company which sold bikes form about 1986 until 1994. The bikes made during that time were specially designed and market within the US.

    Prior to that Bridgestone (not Bridgestone USA) had sold bikes in the US for several years. The model names seemed to be mostly named after stars (celestial, not Hollywood), and were the same bikes offered in other countries. In an effort to gain a larger market share in the US, "Bridgestone USA" was created and the RB and MB bikes series were made for sale in the US. The economic turmoil of the early-1990's put an end to Bridgestone USA, and to all Bridgestones sold in the US. However the parent company still exists and sells bikes outside of the US.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux
    The economic turmoil of the early-1990's put an end to Bridgestone USA, and to all Bridgestones sold in the US.
    Although some would argue the reason for their demise was more that mountain bikes moved on and Grant stayed with rigid forks, thumb shifters (which are now somewhat desirable again), and flex stems...

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    Although some would argue the reason for their demise was more that mountain bikes moved on and Grant stayed with rigid forks, thumb shifters (which are now somewhat desirable again), and flex stems...
    Yeah, that may have been another contributing factor toward declining sales. However, even if they'd produced a cutting-edge bike, the price would have needed to be higher than much of their competition's price due to the economic issues. SunTour ceased to exist at the same time due to the same crisis. But yes, Bridgestone, being much bigger than SunTour, may have been more interested in weathering the storm if the sales volumes had been higher.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux
    Yeah, that may have been another contributing factor toward declining sales. However, even if they'd produced a cutting-edge bike, the price would have needed to be higher than much of their competition's price due to the economic issues. SunTour ceased to exist at the same time due to the same crisis. But yes, Bridgestone, being much bigger than SunTour, may have been more interested in weathering the storm if the sales volumes had been higher.

    ...and Suntour was also doing terribly in the market place at that time...

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    ...and Suntour was also doing terribly in the market place at that time...
    What is the Suntour that is out there now? Is it just a revival of the name?

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    Quote Originally Posted by High Gear
    What is the Suntour that is out there now? Is it just a revival of the name?
    I really like this article: Sunset for Suntour

    That will answer your question, but if you don't want to read the article the quick answer is that the current Suntour is Suntour in name alone - a Chinese parts company now owns the rights to the name.
    5 is the old new black; 6 is the new new black...

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    ...and Suntour was also doing terribly in the market place at that time...
    Obviously, Shimano is (and was) a Japanese company and would have faced the same market and economic conditions, yet they thrived when Suntour failed. Did either company build a lot more parts outside Japan or otherwise minimize exposure to the yen, or did Shimano survive largely by being more in tune with the market? I know they're also in fishing and golf, but my impression is that they're not huge in those industries (?).

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by cegrover
    Obviously, Shimano is (and was) a Japanese company and would have faced the same market and economic conditions, yet they thrived when Suntour failed. Did either company build a lot more parts outside Japan or otherwise minimize exposure to the yen, or did Shimano survive largely by being more in tune with the market? I know they're also in fishing and golf, but my impression is that they're not huge in those industries (?).
    There's probably a lot more to it, but Shimano had moved production to Taiwan and SunTour was still in Japan. However, as FB pointed out, if your business is already in trouble, a financial crisis may only be the straw that broke the camel's back.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    The standard '80s fork starts off at 1" OD (outside diameter) at the crown and tapers down to a spindly 1/2" OD. The offset comes at the bottom 4-5" or so of the fork blade. The Koski blade goes from 1" to 3/4" (50% larger) with a partially enclosed, plug-in dropout to further stiffen things up. The offset on the Koski also comes from a much larger radius that starts closer to the top of the fork near the crown. The Logic fork is stiffer than your standard fork with a 5/8" blade at the dropout and also has a larger radius bend almost like the Koski. I should also mention that the Koski also came in a straight bladed version.

    As for the ride of these, for casual, non-aggressive riding the standard forks might have a more supple feel. For aggressive stuff, the stiffer blades pay off with better "damping", less shutter, and vibration.

    Regarding the stay attachment, I don't think anyone could feasibly tell a difference between the two. Maybe on paper the earlier ones could be a little stiffer laterally since it's a wider attachment point.. Hard to say unless you tested it in a lab I'd guess.
    Great information, thanks, I found a little interesting background information on the Koski fork . 1988 Koski interview scans

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley
    Great information, thanks, I found a little interesting background information on the Koski fork . 1988 Koski interview scans

    yeah, neat article. I happen to have one of those mentioned that Steve Potts made. It's got a Type II crown with the Koski blades. Never have seen another.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux
    There's probably a lot more to it, but Shimano had moved production to Taiwan and SunTour was still in Japan. However, as FB pointed out, if your business is already in trouble, a financial crisis may only be the straw that broke the camel's back.
    Good point - always a combination of factors and similar to the auto industry (among others) in recent years. I wonder if anyone proposed having the Japanese government take a majority stake in the company and split it into the "good Suntour" and the "bad Suntour" at the expense of taxpayers and bond holders?

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by cegrover
    Obviously, Shimano is (and was) a Japanese company and would have faced the same market and economic conditions, yet they thrived when Suntour failed. Did either company build a lot more parts outside Japan or otherwise minimize exposure to the yen, or did Shimano survive largely by being more in tune with the market? I know they're also in fishing and golf, but my impression is that they're not huge in those industries (?).
    Shimano is pretty big in the fishing industry. They make some of the nicest reels on the market. I know a few guys who are tournament billfishermen who won't use anything else.
    Quote Originally Posted by banks
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  75. #75
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    And Japan is a big market for fishing stuff as well. Even if the yen was screwing them over for exports to the US, Shimano had a lot more to fall back on domestically than Suntour did.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  76. #76
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    Shimano has also been cold forging parts for the automotive industry since the early ninties.
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  77. #77
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    For real?
    Quote Originally Posted by banks
    That is one big f'n dude!
    Yes I am!

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by High Gear
    If it's a 55cm, sell it to me.
    49cm... sorry

  79. #79
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    Great thread.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  80. #80
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    Finding a 55cm is like looking for hens teeth.

  81. #81
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    I'm pretty happy committing blasphemy (linear brakes?! Threadless headset!? single speed?!) on my 1992- The pearl tusk paint is holding up nicely. I haven't weighed it but I'd guess it's around 22 or 23 pounds. Easily the funnest bike I own.

    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  82. #82
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    doublepostate
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  83. #83
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    <img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v285/tinc500/DSC01672-1.jpg">

  84. #84
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    Schweet!

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    <img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v285/tinc500/DSC01672-1.jpg">
    That is a picture of beauty.

  86. #86
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    Do these old Bridgestones hold a fat tire in the back? The old Bianchi I use as a singlespeed barely fits a 1.95, so I'm interested in finding a replacement that would do at least a 2.1 with room for some mud. I've seen a lot of MB-?s come up for sale, but I don't want to spend money on one if it won't help my situation.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  87. #87
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    87 Drop Bar on CL

    Who scored the 87 Bridgestone drop bar that was listed on CL [ SF Bay Area] a few weeks back, somebody here I hope?

  88. #88
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    '88
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Wanted:

    Potts, Potts, Potts

  89. #89
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    vw bob, I run modern tires on my 92 and has a 2.1 on the rear and front.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooderdude
    '88

    so clean and so stock. let me know when you're ready.

  91. #91
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    Couple of old scans of 2 of my MB-1s when they were new. One of the 1988 the day I built it in spring of 1988, and one in spring of 1989 with both my 1989 and my 1989 on the pick up.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooderdude
    '88
    That bike is what I'm dreaming of.

  93. #93
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    MB-1 love

    Love the old MB-1's. Don't get to ride my '87 very often... it's semi-retired up in Alaska:

    Original owner must have ditched the drop bars. I don't miss them.

    Picked up an '89 recently for a decent price:

    Needs some paint work & a rebuild on the RS-1, otherwise it's solid.

    And before that I picked up an injured '90:


    It's a decent frame aside from that chainstay... think it's worth fixing? Who wants it?

  94. #94
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    I'd say it's worth fixing. If you don't want it but want to see it get used, I'd offer it to Anthony Maietta of Maietta cycles; I saw that he recently fixed up his father's MB frame to keep it going and he obviously appreciates that these bikes are special. (I would take it and fix it, but it's way too small for me).
    Too many bikes, not enough time.

  95. #95
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    Cool, maybe I'll float him an email. I don't really care what I get for it, but it'd be nice to see it back on the road!

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    yeah, probably so. They may have used National though, if not in house...
    I worked in the factory that made the MB-1s. They were made by Bridgestone in Japan, as were all the Bridgestone bikes. Grant went to Toyo after BS pulled out of the US market to continue his niche marketing with Rivendell. Now BS carbon frames are sourced out to Taiwanese makers. Steel / Alloy Racing bikes and steel Keirin frames are still made in house. I had a 94 like Da'hoov's but with matching color fork. Got it for free from the factory to test ride. We also were racing the XO bike with moustache bars in 93. Never liked the STI shifer set up on those things but one of the national team road riders, Ex Olympian, put in some really fast laps on one. This thread brings back the memories.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon
    I worked in the factory that made the MB-1s. They were made by Bridgestone in Japan
    Your reply is all encompassing and they were made in more that one factory over the years.
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  98. #98
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    Let me say that I have owned several Bridgestones and I currently own a 1991 mb2. I have owned a 1987 MB1 and if I could have one back that would be the one. It is a very unique bike. I also love the 1992-4 MB1. That would be my pick for a rider (or maybe a 1993 MB2)

    That aside, I just picked up a 1991 Fuji Professional (their highest end steel bike) and it is a very sweet bike as well and the geometry is extremely similar to the Bridgestones. Prestige tubing and it has a lot of design touches that make it maybe nicer than the Bridgestone. If it were my size, I would keep it but I bought it for the parts. I think these guys simply didn't market as well.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by gm1230126
    Your reply is all encompassing and they were made in more that one factory over the years.
    Yes you're right, I should have limited my generality to lugged frames and with the caveat "as far as I know". The tig'ed frames were I think welded up in Taiwan.

  100. #100
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    I'm still looking. Anyone see a 55cm, PM me.

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