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  1. #101
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    Specialized and Mongoose

    I'm kinda partial to the early Stumpy and Goose bikes I have. Of course, if you don't own it, it aint $#1+.

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    Too many bikes, and just enough time to ride them.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader
    My vote is any production Sandvik Ti frame
    I had one of those, it was a very well built frame for the price

  3. #103
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    I've noticed a lot of votes for the Giant ATX on this thread. I really liked this ATX 760 I rehabbed last year. Triple butted frame, DX/LX group, even the Timbuk II's were original. The Welch's grape color was set off by the black Araya CV-7s. I was worried the college student who bought it didn't appreciate it enough...but he did promise not to lock it outside. Cool bike!



  4. #104
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    Bridgestone MB-1

    At the moment I'll vote for the 94' Bridgestone MB-1.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Best Mass Production Vintage Mountain Bikes-photo-6.jpg  


  5. #105
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    A happy ending story for all you peep's that wish they still had their first love. Sold my 91 Stump comp to my friend in about 2000. We drifted apart, but hooked up on a job last year. Was curious, so I asked him if he still had the old Stumpy. He said ya, and it's in the rafters. Well you know where this went? he even kept the Direct drive fork in a box full of spares I threw in. It can happen to you.

    I vote old Stumpys, and Parkpre had some knar stuff also. I have one! It's too small, going to my Sister.

  6. #106
    Built4Speed
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    My Bridgestone MB-1. It was perfect . I swapped the seat for a Flite saddle but that was it. My 1990 Trek 950 Singletrack,1987 Specialized Stumpjumper Team and 1991 Scott CST are also my favorites. I owned a lot of Rockhoppers and those are good,tough bikes. The Specialized Rockcombo is a good bike.
    Last edited by vintagemtbr; 02-12-2012 at 11:05 AM.
    "Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death."

  7. #107
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    The Stumpjumper was the FIRST of the production mountain bikes. The 1983 and 1984 models being the best of the line from the 1980's. Those bikes were works of art, and they are legends now.

  8. #108
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    Thought I would bring this thread back in conjunction with the other best of thread
    Last edited by Fred Smedley; 12-13-2012 at 12:21 PM.

  9. #109
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    94--96 Specialized stumpjumpers

    Dialed in geometry, oversized prestige tubing, easily sourced for the working poor.

  10. #110
    WIGGLER
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    Clunker converted Schwinn

    The original mountain bike Schwinn Clunker drum bake bell bottom jeans and flannel!!!
    PAYASO 36er.....Live the Circus

  11. #111
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    When it comes to mountain bikes, vintage means 1980's. Bikes from the 90's are just old, not vintage.

    The answer is Specialized! The Stumpjumper first hit the bike scene in 1982, and that opened the world to a new sport.

  12. #112
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    Best at what?

    Best for riding around the park?
    Best for racing against the gang locally?
    Best for racing in NORBA events?

    For me and my gang, "Best" meant best for racing.

    No one with whom I rode had a Stumpjumper and very few against whom we raced did either.

    In the mid to late 80s, the race courses in the North East saw many more Cannondales, Diamondbacks, Raleighs, Treks and Mongooses (if we are just speaking of mass-produced bikes) than any Specialized bike. I am leaving out the other marques that wouldn't meet the "mass-produced" criteria but these were in abundance as well on the race courses.

    In 1984, for me the "best" ATB (I don't think the MTB distinction had stuck quite yet and people used ATB and MTB interchangably) was my Cannondale. The only others I had ridden were a Fat Chance, Fisher, Stumpjumper and a Mountain Goat. The only two of these I could afford were the Stumpy and 'Dale. I went with the Cannondale even though the Stumpjumper was a little less expensive. Just felt better to me - lighter, more agile.

    In the latter half of the 80s (again if we are sticking only to mass-produced bikes) I had and liked Raleigh Peak and Instinct and yet other Cannondales - again we are talking racing on NORBA courses. At the end of the 80s and early 90s I finally got my first "boutique" type bike and raced that.
    Wanted: more of the same ... but different

  13. #113
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    [QUOTE=83stumpjumper;9976679]When it comes to mountain bikes, vintage means 1980's. Bikes from the 90's are just old, not vintage.

    Yawn.....

    FIFY
    Last edited by jeff; 12-16-2012 at 06:05 PM.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  14. #114
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    In case you didn't read it correctly, the Stumpjumper was the best of the mass produced vintage bikes!
    Arms folded, nods confidently.

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    When it comes to mountain bikes, vintage means 1980's. Bikes from the 90's are just old, not vintage.
    Let's talk in ten years when '90's bikes are vintage and '80's bikes are antique!


  16. #116
    Klunker Kev`
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    Anything other than the original 81/82 model is really just an old bike...




    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    In case you didn't read it correctly, the Stumpjumper was the best of the mass produced vintage bikes!
    Arms folded, nods confidently.
    Wanted: Ritchey built Frame/Fork 85 or earlier.

  17. #117
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    It's not the age of the bikes, it's the fact that they were the first mass produced MTB's. People want to hold a grudge against the big red S because they don't like their business practices. Lots of great, and not so great MTB's came out in the 80's, but they ALL came out AFTER the Stumpjumper. Sorry, but bikes from don't become classics based on year alone.

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    It's not the age of the bikes, it's the fact that they were the first mass produced MTB's. People want to hold a grudge against the big red S because they don't like their business practices. Lots of great, and not so great MTB's came out in the 80's, but they ALL came out AFTER the Stumpjumper. Sorry, but bikes from don't become classics based on year alone.
    They may or may not of been the first mass produced , but compared to to bike they tried to copy it sucked so the best part is a fail. 1989 MB1 best!

  19. #119
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    I'm sorry Fred, it sure sounds like you never had one of those early Stumpjumpers. Don't worry, they pop up on Ebay once in a while.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    I'm sorry Fred, it sure sounds like you never had one of those early Stumpjumpers. Don't worry, they pop up on Ebay once in a while.
    I did and ebay helped me get rid of it.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    I did and ebay helped me get rid of it.
    Wanted: more of the same ... but different

  22. #122
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    Best production bikes for me were late eighties and early nineties, Richmond BC made, Rocky Mountain Bikes.

    As a bike mechanic back then, only Rocky Mountains came with the cable housings perfectly trim to lenght and pre-stretched, wheels were perfectly true and solid, gears already adjusted, every threads and housing caps had a bit a grease on them to keep them from getting seized etc.. Every bikes from the Fusion to the Altitude production bikes came that way.

    They were the fastest bike to assemble by far, you could tell Rocky Mountain care about their bikes and reputation back then. I can't say the same about Kona's, Specialized, Marin's, Cannondales, Scotts and other brands I got to worked on back then. Sure some of those rode amazingly well (like an Early 90's Stumpjumper or Kona) but none felt as solid out of the box as a Rocky.


  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by sansarret View Post
    Best production bikes for me were late eighties and early nineties, Richmond BC made, Rocky Mountain Bikes.

    As a bike mechanic back then, only Rocky Mountains came with the cable housings perfectly trim to lenght and pre-stretched, wheels were perfectly true and solid, gears already adjusted, every threads and housing caps had a bit a grease on them to keep them from getting seized etc.. Every bikes from the Fusion to the Altitude production bikes came that way.

    They were the fastest bike to assemble by far, you could tell Rocky Mountain care about their bikes and reputation back then. I can't say the same about Kona's, Specialized, Marin's, Cannondales, Scotts and other brands I got to worked on back then. Sure some of those rode amazingly well (like an Early 90's Stumpjumper or Kona) but none felt as solid out of the box as a Rocky.

    Now that's a testimonial I can stand behind.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  24. #124
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    I'll add my vote to the Stumpjumper.

    I've got this 85 Stumpjumper (serial number M5F10037) from Ebay a few months ago after watching auctions for a while of vintage mountain bikes. I was looking for an all-rounder type bike with lugs and braze-ons for racks and fenders. I don't intend to go fast with it so I was not looking for short chainstays and long top tubes. I intend to ride it in a leisurely pace and in an upright position:



    It is very similar to my 81 Specialized Sequoia (serial number is M1K00027) and probably came out from the same factory.


  25. #125
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    How right you are, sir! My 85 SJ is a very comfortable around town bike.Put on some Specialized street tires and you're ready to go. You'll love it. Mind sharing what you paid for it?

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