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  1. #101
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    Specialized and Mongoose

    I'm kinda partial to the early Stumpy and Goose bikes I have. Of course, if you don't own it, it aint $#1+.




    Too many bikes, and just enough time to ride them.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader
    My vote is any production Sandvik Ti frame
    I had one of those, it was a very well built frame for the price

  3. #103
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    I've noticed a lot of votes for the Giant ATX on this thread. I really liked this ATX 760 I rehabbed last year. Triple butted frame, DX/LX group, even the Timbuk II's were original. The Welch's grape color was set off by the black Araya CV-7s. I was worried the college student who bought it didn't appreciate it enough...but he did promise not to lock it outside. Cool bike!



  4. #104
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    Bridgestone MB-1

    At the moment I'll vote for the 94' Bridgestone MB-1.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Best Mass Production Vintage Mountain Bikes-photo-6.jpg  


  5. #105
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    A happy ending story for all you peep's that wish they still had their first love. Sold my 91 Stump comp to my friend in about 2000. We drifted apart, but hooked up on a job last year. Was curious, so I asked him if he still had the old Stumpy. He said ya, and it's in the rafters. Well you know where this went? he even kept the Direct drive fork in a box full of spares I threw in. It can happen to you.

    I vote old Stumpys, and Parkpre had some knar stuff also. I have one! It's too small, going to my Sister.

  6. #106
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    My Bridgestone MB-1. It was perfect . I swapped the seat for a Flite saddle but that was it. My 1990 Trek 950 Singletrack,1987 Specialized Stumpjumper Team and 1991 Scott CST are also my favorites. I owned a lot of Rockhoppers and those are good,tough bikes. The Specialized Rockcombo is a good bike.
    Last edited by vintagemtbr; 02-12-2012 at 11:05 AM.
    "Faster and faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death."

  7. #107
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    The Stumpjumper was the FIRST of the production mountain bikes. The 1983 and 1984 models being the best of the line from the 1980's. Those bikes were works of art, and they are legends now.

  8. #108
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    Thought I would bring this thread back in conjunction with the other best of thread
    Last edited by Fred Smedley; 12-13-2012 at 12:21 PM.

  9. #109
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    94--96 Specialized stumpjumpers

    Dialed in geometry, oversized prestige tubing, easily sourced for the working poor.

  10. #110
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    Clunker converted Schwinn

    The original mountain bike Schwinn Clunker drum bake bell bottom jeans and flannel!!!
    PAYASO 36er.....Live the Circus

    MR. 36er TROLL


  11. #111
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    When it comes to mountain bikes, vintage means 1980's. Bikes from the 90's are just old, not vintage.

    The answer is Specialized! The Stumpjumper first hit the bike scene in 1982, and that opened the world to a new sport.

  12. #112
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    Best at what?

    Best for riding around the park?
    Best for racing against the gang locally?
    Best for racing in NORBA events?

    For me and my gang, "Best" meant best for racing.

    No one with whom I rode had a Stumpjumper and very few against whom we raced did either.

    In the mid to late 80s, the race courses in the North East saw many more Cannondales, Diamondbacks, Raleighs, Treks and Mongooses (if we are just speaking of mass-produced bikes) than any Specialized bike. I am leaving out the other marques that wouldn't meet the "mass-produced" criteria but these were in abundance as well on the race courses.

    In 1984, for me the "best" ATB (I don't think the MTB distinction had stuck quite yet and people used ATB and MTB interchangably) was my Cannondale. The only others I had ridden were a Fat Chance, Fisher, Stumpjumper and a Mountain Goat. The only two of these I could afford were the Stumpy and 'Dale. I went with the Cannondale even though the Stumpjumper was a little less expensive. Just felt better to me - lighter, more agile.

    In the latter half of the 80s (again if we are sticking only to mass-produced bikes) I had and liked Raleigh Peak and Instinct and yet other Cannondales - again we are talking racing on NORBA courses. At the end of the 80s and early 90s I finally got my first "boutique" type bike and raced that.
    Wanted: more of the same ... but different

  13. #113
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    [QUOTE=83stumpjumper;9976679]When it comes to mountain bikes, vintage means 1980's. Bikes from the 90's are just old, not vintage.

    Yawn.....

    FIFY
    Last edited by jeff; 12-16-2012 at 06:05 PM.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

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  14. #114
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    In case you didn't read it correctly, the Stumpjumper was the best of the mass produced vintage bikes!
    Arms folded, nods confidently.

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    When it comes to mountain bikes, vintage means 1980's. Bikes from the 90's are just old, not vintage.
    Let's talk in ten years when '90's bikes are vintage and '80's bikes are antique!


  16. #116
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    Anything other than the original 81/82 model is really just an old bike...




    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    In case you didn't read it correctly, the Stumpjumper was the best of the mass produced vintage bikes!
    Arms folded, nods confidently.
    Wanted: Ritchey built Frame/Fork 85 or earlier.

  17. #117
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    It's not the age of the bikes, it's the fact that they were the first mass produced MTB's. People want to hold a grudge against the big red S because they don't like their business practices. Lots of great, and not so great MTB's came out in the 80's, but they ALL came out AFTER the Stumpjumper. Sorry, but bikes from don't become classics based on year alone.

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    It's not the age of the bikes, it's the fact that they were the first mass produced MTB's. People want to hold a grudge against the big red S because they don't like their business practices. Lots of great, and not so great MTB's came out in the 80's, but they ALL came out AFTER the Stumpjumper. Sorry, but bikes from don't become classics based on year alone.
    They may or may not of been the first mass produced , but compared to to bike they tried to copy it sucked so the best part is a fail. 1989 MB1 best!

  19. #119
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    I'm sorry Fred, it sure sounds like you never had one of those early Stumpjumpers. Don't worry, they pop up on Ebay once in a while.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    I'm sorry Fred, it sure sounds like you never had one of those early Stumpjumpers. Don't worry, they pop up on Ebay once in a while.
    I did and ebay helped me get rid of it.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    I did and ebay helped me get rid of it.
    Wanted: more of the same ... but different

  22. #122
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    Best production bikes for me were late eighties and early nineties, Richmond BC made, Rocky Mountain Bikes.

    As a bike mechanic back then, only Rocky Mountains came with the cable housings perfectly trim to lenght and pre-stretched, wheels were perfectly true and solid, gears already adjusted, every threads and housing caps had a bit a grease on them to keep them from getting seized etc.. Every bikes from the Fusion to the Altitude production bikes came that way.

    They were the fastest bike to assemble by far, you could tell Rocky Mountain care about their bikes and reputation back then. I can't say the same about Kona's, Specialized, Marin's, Cannondales, Scotts and other brands I got to worked on back then. Sure some of those rode amazingly well (like an Early 90's Stumpjumper or Kona) but none felt as solid out of the box as a Rocky.


  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by sansarret View Post
    Best production bikes for me were late eighties and early nineties, Richmond BC made, Rocky Mountain Bikes.

    As a bike mechanic back then, only Rocky Mountains came with the cable housings perfectly trim to lenght and pre-stretched, wheels were perfectly true and solid, gears already adjusted, every threads and housing caps had a bit a grease on them to keep them from getting seized etc.. Every bikes from the Fusion to the Altitude production bikes came that way.

    They were the fastest bike to assemble by far, you could tell Rocky Mountain care about their bikes and reputation back then. I can't say the same about Kona's, Specialized, Marin's, Cannondales, Scotts and other brands I got to worked on back then. Sure some of those rode amazingly well (like an Early 90's Stumpjumper or Kona) but none felt as solid out of the box as a Rocky.

    Now that's a testimonial I can stand behind.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

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  24. #124
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    I'll add my vote to the Stumpjumper.

    I've got this 85 Stumpjumper (serial number M5F10037) from Ebay a few months ago after watching auctions for a while of vintage mountain bikes. I was looking for an all-rounder type bike with lugs and braze-ons for racks and fenders. I don't intend to go fast with it so I was not looking for short chainstays and long top tubes. I intend to ride it in a leisurely pace and in an upright position:



    It is very similar to my 81 Specialized Sequoia (serial number is M1K00027) and probably came out from the same factory.


  25. #125
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    How right you are, sir! My 85 SJ is a very comfortable around town bike.Put on some Specialized street tires and you're ready to go. You'll love it. Mind sharing what you paid for it?

  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    How right you are, sir! My 85 SJ is a very comfortable around town bike.Put on some Specialized street tires and you're ready to go. You'll love it. Mind sharing what you paid for it?
    I paid $405 for the bike and $75 for shipping and I am very happy with the purchase. I was prepared to pay a bit more for it

    I've come across and appreciate your stories and positive reviews of your very nice and clean 85 SJ and 84 SJ SC

  27. #127
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    If I remember correctly, I paid $500 for my 85 SJ that I found on Ebay 2 1/2 years ago. I was lucky that it was in mint condition, clearly never ridden on a trail. I know there's folks on here that think Specialized is the devil, not sure why. They make great bikes and gear. I'm just a loyal customer of theirs. Been in love with their bikes since 1983. Just bought a 2013 SJ Comp last week. But my heart belongs to the bikes they made in the early 80's. True MTB history!

  28. #128
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    You got a better deal on your mint 85 SJ and considering they were AFAIK $800 in 1985 $ a good purchase moneywise IMO. Mine is not mint but still in a nice enough condition considering its age.


    This pic was taken upon receipt of the bike. The bike stand will be taken off because I don't like to have anything pinching the tubes.

    Specialized and Rivendell elicit strong positive and negative feelings among bike enthusiast from what I read in forums and one common thing between them is that they are owned by strong and quite visible personalities. I believe it goes with their being movers and shakers...

    I admire people like them and like their bikes but I also understand why there would be others who would feel the opposite about them.

  29. #129
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    The 84 SJ I got last month has slightly pinched tubes from where the original owner had a kickstand. Other than a few small scrathes, it's also in great condition. Why would anyone put a kickstand on a Stumpjumper? Shame on them!
    I think some people feel Specialized stole a bike design and mass produced it. All that did was create more business for the custom frame builders by increasing awareness of the new kind of bikes. I'm not trying to convert the haters, they're entitled to their opinions, even if they're wrong.

  30. #130
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    Some people did not care about the aesthetics of the bike. Some apparently preferred the convenience and utility, especially when their intended use were for daily commuting/transport.

    That is one reason I read about; but there are other reasons for the hate from what I read in forums.

  31. #131
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    Early 90's steel stumpjumper, right before the whole metal matrix aluminum..

  32. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto View Post
    Early 90's steel stumpjumper, right before the whole metal matrix aluminum..

    But then early 90's Kona Explosifs were awesome! Early 90s was a great time to buy an upper end production bike.. all dressed in deore xt or suntour xc pro. Geometries were good, steel was light and rock shox wasn't everywhere so you got upper end steel forks, double butted light precise forks.

  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by 83stumpjumper View Post
    The 84 SJ I got last month has slightly pinched tubes from where the original owner had a kickstand. Other than a few small scrathes, it's also in great condition. Why would anyone put a kickstand on a Stumpjumper? Shame on them!
    I think some people feel Specialized stole a bike design and mass produced it. All that did was create more business for the custom frame builders by increasing awareness of the new kind of bikes. I'm not trying to convert the haters, they're entitled to their opinions, even if they're wrong.
    Do you go door knocking?

  34. #134
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    Fat Chance Monster, Ibis Avion, Ritchey Ultra. Salsa ala carte.
    Those are production bikes.

  35. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1 View Post
    Fat Chance Monster, Ibis Avion, Ritchey Ultra. Salsa ala carte.
    Those are production bikes.
    And I've owned three of the four mentioned. The Fat was the best handling. The Salsa best over all and the Ritchey...well..I just don't like the fit and ride.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
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  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    And I've owned three of the four mentioned. The Fat was the best handling. The Salsa best over all and the Ritchey...well..I just don't like the fit and ride.
    I tried to love the fat , it had great balance for slow riding, but the 95 stumpy with the light 740 gram DD fork remains my favorite. I really am curies about Salsa's though.

  37. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    I tried to love the fat , it had great balance for slow riding, but the 95 stumpy with the light 740 gram DD fork remains my favorite. I really am curies about Salsa's though.
    Just a great all around bike. My 90 is very similar in feel to the 91 S-Works steel that I borrowed for a bit. I can imagine the stock Stumpies ran the same geometry.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  38. #138
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    Easy...Schwinn homegrown

  39. #139
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    Still shredding trails on my 98' hardtail bass boat red

  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1 View Post
    Fat Chance Monster, Ibis Avion, Ritchey Ultra. Salsa ala carte.
    Those are production bikes.
    I did not like the ride of the Monster at all ('92 model in black). Very disappointing considering the $$ I spent building it up. But I love my '89 Ultra.

  41. #141
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    Heck I was really surprised at how much I really like the ride on my old 92 Rockhopper with no susoension. I took it out the day to some trails that, on my Cannondale Beast of the East, scared me to death. The geometry on those bikes was crazy. I always felt as thorough I was gonna go over the handle bars.

  42. #142
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    OK, I know this is a dead thread but after reading some comments I feel obligated to say my opinion with regards to 90s mtbs being "vintage" or not.
    I understand that the 80s was the birth of the sport and perhaps owns the vintage tag however, 90s are at least classic! I mean it was in the 90s that competition really was creating some of the best riding steel frames , arguably, until now! Geometry was dialed with sloping top tubes etc. To me, early 90s was like the late 60s for muscle cars with competition driving performance to entirely new levels.
    Just look at all the different steel tubing makers and the rapid improvement in tubing by Tange, Ishiwata, Columbus, Reynolds and True Temper. Todays tube set variety in steel is nothing compared to then. Heck, a 4lb frame of steel was almost common whereas today you'de be lucky to find one.
    Manufacturer spec was also cool. just take a gander at Kona catalouges from the day. The Kona Project 2 fork is like a sample of the bike industry at that time with starting out as innovative straight bladed forks progressing to a triple butted profile of 1.3mm/.9mm/.5mm with a rifled portion inside the steerer!
    The best steel bikes were made in the early 90s.

  43. #143
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    MTB's from the '90s are great project bikes

    Inexpensive commuter rig powder coated and built up for under 3 beans. Note the Kona project two fork that matches the paint job- my buddy had to give it to me because it fit so well.- Yeah old bikes can be had on Craigslist for a hundred bucks or so that are still just as functional as the day they rolled off the floor. Vee brakes and rim brake wheels are easy to find cheap, as are square taper BB's. I ride this thing more than any other bike- low maintenance, grab and go!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Best Mass Production Vintage Mountain Bikes-img_0907-1024x768-copy.jpg  


  44. #144
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    Cannondale Delta V 600

    Best Mass Production Vintage Mountain Bikes-image.jpg
    I bought this bike new in 1994 and the wheels a couple of years later. I have upgraded all of the components over the years and I still love the way this bike handles on the trails. The bike gets allot of looks and it's fun talking to newbies that can't believe this bike is 20 years old. I'll be on a 13 mile ride with it today. Happy riding!

  45. #145
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    I had Schwinn High Sierra, Bridgestone MB3, and Specialized Rockhopper. Overall, I preferred the specialized bike, it just rode better.

    Got back into biking a few years ago and started my way back through the Specialized lineup. Hardrock, Rockhopper, biplane Stumpy, Stumpy Sport.... Finally found a Ritchey and it ruled all others. Kept the Ritchey and sold the rest.

    But I like the chase, so I kept shopping and now have 3 Stumpy Teams, and an 85 Stumpy.

    Ritchey still rules. I think It's an 88? the top tube pings a nice high note. But the Stumpy team frame pings just as high and with 1.6 tires it's a nice complementing ride.

    I really think it took specialized a few years to get it right. I think it's pretty well documented that they bought some Ritchey frames to copy and, that Ritchey knew what was up, so he gave them some frames with issues.

    The early 83-84 bi-plane bikes are super cool. and fun to ride, but you can really feel the difference with the 85-86 model geometry, they still have lugged steel, and upgraded components. IMHO It's a much better bike overall.

  46. #146
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    Not enough Jamis or Bianchi love in this thread. I've kept my Diablo for upwards of 1/4 century 'cuz I love riding it, would do the same with a Grizzly if I found a nice one on Craigslist or something. The Jamis isn't really fillet-brazed, but it's still lugged/brazed/TIG-welded all-in-one, which is still unusual for a vintage production bike? Grizzly was my 2nd-most-fun production bike, behind the Diablo but ahead of my Rockhopper -- a competent bike, just lacking the fun-factor of the Jamis and Bianchi options of the day.
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  47. #147
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    Yeti ARC
    Ibis Mojo
    Stumpjumper
    Bridgestone
    Merlin

    I test rode a Trek OCLV hardtail and really enjoyed it.

  48. #148
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    Five years and no mention of Voodoo? I'd probably spend my cash on a GT before a Voodoo, but I certainly wouldn't kick a Bizango out of bed in the morning.

    Also, if we're counting not quite so vintage/mass produced, how about an Albert Eisentraut built Marin Team Marin in Columbus UltraFoco? If you get it wet you can practically see through the tubes, but you'd be hard pressed to put together a lighter retro build in steel.

  49. #149
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    I had a 16" DB Apex set up for trials (I'm 6'3" and all legs). Nice frame, I'd ride another in my size as a daily BCC.
    'Tis better to bail and not to hurt, than not to bail and eat much dirt!
    -unknown

  50. #150
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    Late 80's Diamond Back Arrival?

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