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  1. #1
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    New question here. American Breezer - What to do with this bike?

    This bike has been in my stable since the early 90's. My dad raced it as-is at Sea Otter Classic in '96 or '97 (his only mountain bike race ever). Since then it's been hanging in the rafters.

    I don't know much about the bike - it's history or it's value. I believe it was made in the late 80's, but don't know much beyond that.

    What can you tell me about it?

    Any suggestions on what to do with it?

    -Octane

    American Breezer - What to do with this bike?-breezer1.jpg

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    American Breezer - What to do with this bike?-breezer4.jpg

    American Breezer - What to do with this bike?-breezer5.jpg

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    American Breezer - What to do with this bike?-breezer8.jpg

    American Breezer - What to do with this bike?-breezer9.jpg

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    American Breezer - What to do with this bike?-breezer11.jpg

    American Breezer - What to do with this bike?-breezer12.jpg
    I get paid to ride shotgun.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    Ok.....Iíll take it off your hands

  3. #3
    bikes don't have motors
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    Bitchin time capsule, I wouldn't touch it except to clean it up.
    Quote Originally Posted by me View Post
    Of all the paths you take in life, make sure that most of them are dirt.
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Gravel bike hate is imagined.
    Sweet.

  4. #4
    twinflight
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    Tune it up, then clean and polish. Looks like a good weekend project.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Phobia of petting zoos.
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    Dont: Part it out, update components.

    Do: Clean it up, regrease and adjust bearings, replace cables and outers (the front brake cable is crusty and the outer is broken, for example) check rims for true, check tyres for perishing.

    Reassemble it with love and care, take it out now and then for a guilty pleasure ride, become part of the awesome Vintage MTB community.

    Or - ship it to me and I'll do all that for you. May not make it back to you though...

    That's a lovely bike and loaded with cool.

    Grumps

  6. #6
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    I can't speak for the Breezer, but I love Americans lovely, unique welds.

    Bought an M16 with full XT a few years back in nice ridable shape, for under $600.

    So, not crazy valuable (though perhaps the Breezers command more?) but a fine vintage MTB and one with family provenance.

    I'd follow Grumps advice, and enjoy....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    I can't speak for the Breezer, but I love Americans lovely, unique welds.
    I don't get it. Who is "Americans"? And how were they affiliated with Breezer?
    I get paid to ride shotgun.

  8. #8
    bikes don't have motors
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    Quote Originally Posted by Octane View Post
    I don't get it. Who is "Americans"? And how were they affiliated with Breezer?


    Right there on the downtube;



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    Quote Originally Posted by me View Post
    Of all the paths you take in life, make sure that most of them are dirt.
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Gravel bike hate is imagined.
    Sweet.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Octane View Post
    I don't get it. Who is "Americans"? And how were they affiliated with Breezer?
    The bike was a joint effort between two companies, "American Bicycles Manufacturing" and "Breezer." Breezer, was/is Joe Breeze, one of the guys that started the mountain bike craze in the SF Bay Area. I believe that we was responsible for designing the frame. American was a frame builder out of St Cloud, MN, named Fred Schilplin and was a early builder of aluminum frames. Fred's philosophy on aluminum frames was different than most other US builders: American frames used smaller diameter tubes with thicker walls, while everyone else (most notable Cannondale and Klein) went with large diameter thin-walled tubing. Anyway... these two guys came together to produce your bike. Designed in CA, and built in MN.

    Both companies build top-end bikes in the 1980s and early 90s. Both made great bikes. Compared to today's bikes, it might not seem all that special, but that bike was an awesome bike in it's day. Clean up it, ride it, enjoy it. It's a neat bike.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux View Post
    The bike was a joint effort between two companies, "American Bicycles Manufacturing" and "Breezer." Breezer, was/is Joe Breeze, one of the guys that started the mountain bike craze in the SF Bay Area. I believe that we was responsible for designing the frame. American was a frame builder out of St Cloud, MN, named Fred Schilplin and was a early builder of aluminum frames. Fred's philosophy on aluminum frames was different than most other US builders: American frames used smaller diameter tubes with thicker walls, while everyone else (most notable Cannondale and Klein) went with large diameter thin-walled tubing. Anyway... these two guys came together to produce your bike. Designed in CA, and built in MN.

    Both companies build top-end bikes in the 1980s and early 90s. Both made great bikes. Compared to today's bikes, it might not seem all that special, but that bike was an awesome bike in it's day. Clean up it, ride it, enjoy it. It's a neat bike.
    Thank you for the info, laffeaux! This is what I was trying to figure out!

    Sadly this bike will likely be culled from the heard this summer. I'm not even sure how to market this, or what to ask for it.
    I get paid to ride shotgun.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Octane View Post
    Thank you for the info, laffeaux! This is what I was trying to figure out!

    Sadly this bike will likely be culled from the heard this summer. I'm not even sure how to market this, or what to ask for it.
    If you put it on eBay you don't need worry about the price. It will just happen.

    If you sell on MTBR, the price will not be super high. Although American frames are really cool, their prices don't seem to reflect that. It probably would sell for $400-$600, even though it's as nice or nicer than a lot of bikes that sell for significantly more.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  12. #12
    Retro on Steroids
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    The only bike I ever had stolen was my American Breezer.

    But that isn't the one.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Repack Rider View Post
    The only bike I ever had stolen was my American Breezer.

    But that isn't the one.
    Was it serial number 130? I picked one up at a police auction back in 90 or so for a couple hundred bucks in Santa Cruz. Pretty sweet bike.

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