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  1. #1
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    '84 Miyata Ridge Runner

    '84 Miyata Ridge Runner-imageuploadedbytapatalk1344093444.100787.jpg

    Got the frame from my bro-in-law, stripped, primed and painted it myself. The parts i got restored was the frame, fork, bullmoose bar and the Tange Levin headset. To complete the build i went with newer components.


    By the way, here is a pic of the original build i got from the Miyata '84 catalogue..

    '84 Miyata Ridge Runner-imageuploadedbytapatalk1344094484.078123.jpg


    Thanks for looking

  2. #2
    Master of the Face Plant
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    Was everybody taller in the 80's or did the Japanese just think all Americans were giants? All I ever see of older bikes are the huge ones. Kudos for keeping a good bike out of the landfill.
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
    ^^^Best Bike Shop of MTBR 2008^^^

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandmangts View Post
    Was everybody taller in the 80's or did the Japanese just think all Americans were giants? All I ever see of older bikes are the huge ones. Kudos for keeping a good bike out of the landfill.
    I have a theory on that. I think a lot of the really clean examples we see now ("survivors") are small and x-large sizes. There are just fewer people that fit those sizes and they tend to acquire less miles. I work at a shop that runs a small rental/demo fleet. At the end of the season, the very small and very large bikes are still in pretty good shape, while all the mediums and larges are beat to death.

  4. #4
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    Haha you might think i'm a tall guy, actually i'm just 5'5 and this frame is way to big for me, but so far the only issue i have with this frame is the standover height, as for the reach the bullmoose's bar back sweep compensates for a comfortable and stable handling..

  5. #5
    Master of the Face Plant
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhickey79 View Post
    I have a theory on that. I think a lot of the really clean examples we see now ("survivors") are small and x-large sizes. There are just fewer people that fit those sizes and they tend to acquire less miles. I work at a shop that runs a small rental/demo fleet. At the end of the season, the very small and very large bikes are still in pretty good shape, while all the mediums and larges are beat to death.
    Makes sense, Not only that the ones that fit people don't stay for sale long. Thats why I have been looking for a fillet brazed Ritchey in my size and price range for 5 years.
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
    ^^^Best Bike Shop of MTBR 2008^^^

  6. #6
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    '84 Miyata Ridge Runner

    '84 Miyata Ridge Runner-imageuploadedbytapatalk1361798784.084894.jpg

    Here she is now.. in one of my favorite local trails..

  7. #7
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    '84 Miyata Ridge Runner

    '84 Miyata Ridge Runner-imageuploadedbytapatalk1361799432.488118.jpg

    Here's another view of the trail..

  8. #8
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    '85 Ridge Runner

    Here's one of my 1985 Ridge Runner. I am the original owner having purchased the bike new from the Trail Shop in halifax. The frame is a large as it was the only one they had in stock and I was too impatient to wait for the proper size. The bike is pretty well stock except for the rear "d",(broke the Sun Tour), seat, and the "Mega Range" cassette. I still ride this bike and love it:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails '84 Miyata Ridge Runner-imgp0061.jpg  


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