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  1. #1
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    1997 Jamis dakota

    Greetings
    This is my first post on this forum and I have questions in regards to a 1997 Jamis dakota I recently purchased off of craigslist for $120.
    The overall condition of the bike is very good, minor skuffs on the frame but for being 16 years old, all original parts are present and in good working order.
    I have two issues with the bike I would like to fix.
    The first being, the seat post tube is stuck in the frame.
    The second, and I have done a little research on this already, the rock shox have lost their preload and need to be rebuilt.

    Is there an effective way of removing an aluminum seat post from a steel frame? I have already soaked it in WD40 and attached a slide hammer to the top of the post but it will not budge!

    Can I replace the failed eurathane cushions in my rock shox Judy sl with spring?
    Any help would be much appreciated.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    slow
    Reputation: sgltrak's Avatar
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    I recently had to resort to drastic measures to remove a stuck seat post from my 1987 Jamis Dakota. I cut off the top of the seat post and packed it with ice, and plugged it. Then I turned the frame over and clamped the seat post in my bench vice. I heated the frame with a torch and then stood on my work bench while pulling and twisting the frame. It took a few tries and some back and leg strength, but I got it out while no doubt providing much enjoyment and entertainment to passersby on the street.

  3. #3
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    I recently had to resort to drastic measures to remove a stuck seat post from my 1987 Jamis Dakota. I cut off the top of the seat post and packed it with ice, and plugged it. Then I turned the frame over and clamped the seat post in my bench vice. I heated the frame with a torch and then stood on my work bench while pulling and twisting the frame. It took a few tries and some back and leg strength, but I got it out while no doubt providing much enjoyment and entertainment to passersby on the street.
    Next time, please...make a video.

  4. #4
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    If you want to save the seatpost then the best method is soaking it something that works. You know, something other than WD40.

    I've heard good things about a 50/50 mix of automatic transmission fluid and acetone. 2 stroke fuel is a similar concept, as is diesel fuel. Pull the bottom bracket out so you can get it into the seat tube and let it do its thing for a few days.

    Freezing it with liquid nitrogen also helps, if you can get some.

    It might be counter intuitive to push the post in further, but hitting the head with a rubber mallet to force it down into the seat tube can be enough to break the seal, and easier than trying to pull it up and out.

    Even the above might not work and you need to resort to heavy artillery.

    If you aren't fussed on saving the post, then clamping the head in a bench vise and twisting the frame back and forth can break the seal.

    Finally, chemical warfare. Caustic soda (in the form of oven cleaner) eats aluminium and wan't hurt steel. Drain cleaner (Draino? Not sure what brands you have to hand, or their chemical composition) also works.

    Good luck, keep us posted with the progress.

    Grumps

  5. #5
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    If you want to save the seatpost then the best method is soaking it something that works. You know, something other than WD40.
    AKA, Kroil.

    If you didn't know, you'll thank me.....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  6. #6
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    From the late great Sheldon Brown 14 Ways to Unstick a Seatpost
    Will add that aluminum expands with heat much more and faster so heat won't work much unless you can keep the post cool. Cooling the whole area (both aluminum and steel) then heating back and forth a few times may help. Use a heat gun or hair dryer, then a rag soaked in ice water or pail that fits the whole area of the bike.
    Focus on spinning the post first to get it moving and not pulling it out. Try with the saddle on the post first but if no worky cut the post and stick something in it so the bench vise doesn't squish it. Leave the wheels on the bike so you have more leverage and it's less likely to bend the frame, flip and install the post onto bench vise. Think shock therapy instead of slow even pressure.
    I wouldn't recommend any science projects with harsh chemicals since I've never seen a good outcome that way, but a wash/rinse with ammonia will make quick work of any aluminum oxide, then a soak overnight with penetrating oil is a good plan. You can also let it soak by putting whatever into the water bottle cage bolts while the bike is upside down so it doesn't get to the bb.

    When all else fails cut the post down low to the frame and cut it long ways down into the seat tube 3 or more slices and remove.

    Good luck, let us know how you make out, and welcome to the site.
    Last edited by theMeat; 06-30-2013 at 09:03 AM.
    the strongest trees grow on the windiest plains... ~Tone's

  7. #7
    TrinityRiverKerplunk
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    Aero-Kroil may work. I wish you the best and I want to see this frame salvaged because I have a personal liking for the steel Jamis variations, from the original U-brake models up to these 90s versions.

    Sure wish I had thought of the caustic soda trick a few years back. Ruined a '90 Stumpy Comp when I couldn't get the post out. Ended up brazing a new seat tube after the carnage had been cleaned up.
    Good friction shifting is getting hard to find nowadays....

  8. #8
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    Caustic soda and paint don't play nice together, talk about a carnage and a science project.

    Kroil works great but can be a pain to find locally, PB Blaster should be easier to find and IMO works just as well. Let it soak.
    the strongest trees grow on the windiest plains... ~Tone's

  9. #9
    TrinityRiverKerplunk
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Caustic soda and paint don't play nice together, talk about a carnage and a science project.
    So true. In may case I went way to far and ended up trying to drill out the post with a 1" bit on the drill press, and if I had been a bit more careful it would have turned out OK. But the bit found a way to come though the seat tube, so paint was irrelevant at that point.

    Let my case be a lesson for others, follow all of the Sheldon Brown and assorted tips by the great members here FIRST before ever doing something so drastic like I did.
    Good friction shifting is getting hard to find nowadays....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chromoly View Post
    Greetings
    This is my first post on this forum and I have questions in regards to a 1997 Jamis dakota I recently purchased off of craigslist for $120.
    The overall condition of the bike is very good, minor skuffs on the frame but for being 16 years old, all original parts are present and in good working order.
    I have two issues with the bike I would like to fix.
    The first being, the seat post tube is stuck in the frame.
    The second, and I have done a little research on this already, the rock shox have lost their preload and need to be rebuilt.

    Is there an effective way of removing an aluminum seat post from a steel frame? I have already soaked it in WD40 and attached a slide hammer to the top of the post but it will not budge!

    Can I replace the failed eurathane cushions in my rock shox Judy sl with spring?
    Any help would be much appreciated.
    Thanks.
    Any updates on the seat post? Tried Liquid Wrench?

    Find any rebuild stuff for the shocks?

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